12

「どれ腹{はら}の傷{きず}をおみせ、薬草{やくそう}をぬってあげよう。」 You are "seeing" the wrong 「どれ」 here, which is the 「どれ」("which one") from こそあど. This 「どれ」 is an interjection meaning "now", "well", "let's see", etc. It is most often used when checking on or taking a look at something. We also say 「どら」、「どれどれ」, etc. for the same purpose. "Now, let me see the wound on your tummy. ...


12

あまり詳しい説明ではないのですが、明鏡国語辞典によりますと・・・ なに【何】 🈩〘代〙 ❸《「ーを・・・か?」「ーを・・・のだ!」など、疑問・反語・詰問などを表す自動詞文で》不審の気持ちで、事態成立の基盤を問う。また、その不当性を非難する。どんな理由で。なぜに。なんで。 「何を泣いているのか?」「何をためらうことがあろうか」「何をぐずぐずしてるんだ!」 (語法)他動詞の場合は、~ヲに対する普通の疑問を表す。「何を読んでるの?」


11

This function of this か is not purely phonetic, but rather serves to make the sentence less of a outward statement and more of a self-directed or self-reflecting one. It makes the information value of sentence primarily be “I had considered ~ previously but wasn’t sure, but in the end it indeed it is 〜, huh...” It’s often is accompanied by やっぱり (or 予想通り ...


7

Since most of Japanese Question + も patterns ("any- (... not)") are, as you know, only allowed to be used with negative predicates, we usually make some workarounds to express the "every-" idea. Unfortunately, the ways we've taken are not consistent across words, so maybe you're confused by it. any- (+ NEG) no matter - (regular) every- (...


6

Be careful when translating to/from English because there is some overlap with certain words like these. 誰でも means "anyone" in the sense of "whoever". マラソンに参加する人は誰でもTシャツをもらう → Anyone who/Whoever participates in the marathon will receive a T-shirt MPAAレーティング・システムで「G」とは誰でも見られる作品です → In the MPAA rating system, a "G" (movie) is one that anyone can watch ...


5

Your explanation is right. The speaker is not quite sure if that's the right explanation (something like, "The blood has hardened, perhaps because a lot of time has passed"). The grammar you are looking for is defined in this page, which says: 疑いの気持ちで推定する意を表す


5

This か is the same as the particle we see all the time at the end of an interrogative sentence. It's also used in a noun clause like so: いつ車を売りますか? When do they sell the cars? いつ車を売るか (noun clause) when they sell the cars 今日は日曜日ですか? Is it Sunday today? 今日は日曜日か (noun clause) whether it is Sunday today Therefore, "車の会社がいつごろこのような自動運転の車を売り始めるか" ...


5

The user17907's answer gives great examples, so I briefly show you the meanings of each phrase: どれか: one/some of the choices (with no preference) ex: あなたは本をたくさん持っていますね。どれか貸してください。 You have a number of books. Would you lend me one of them? どれも: each of stuffs. everything. この店の果物はどれも新鮮だ。 All the fruits they sell are fresh. どれでも: all of the ...


4

No, you don't need it unless the sentence has どうして or なぜ. (Incidentally, わからない is better rather than 知らない here.)


4

かける here would literally mean something like "to cast", but 声をかける is an expression in Japanese to mean "to greet someone", "to say something (to someone)", or even "to invite someone (to something)" and "to cheer someone up (in sports)". It is actually rare to see it written in kanji. If you are to still write it, it would be 声を掛ける. So, 声をかけようかどうしようか迷っていた ...


4

どなた is very polite. 尊敬語. You should say どなたでしょうか? when talking to a person of higher status. 誰 is not polite. It can be used when talking to people of the same or lower status (friends, family etc. ). If someone uses 誰 when talking to someone with higher status, it is very impolite.


4

(Adding my own answer for those who may run into this problem in the future) @Shoko's answer confirmed my hypothesis. You can use 何を with intransitive verbs, and it actually means "why", "how dare you", "what makes you", etc. It usually has some dubious/accusatory tone. You can consider it a special construction. The following ...


4

Given the context: a man was borrowing an umbrella at a station, and was asking a station worker how and when he could return it. どうしますか is absolutely better than 何をしますか, because in this situation, they respectively mean: 明日何をしますか What am I going to do tomorrow? 明日どうしますか What am I going to do with it tomorrow? Incidentally, this is not the most ...


4

Although both sentences could be translated as, "What is X?", a fuller explication reveals the differences. 何【なに】    が   X です  か。 what [SUBJ] X [is] [QUESTION] Grammatically, the "what" is the subject of this sentence -- the 何【なに】 is the word marked with が, the subject particle. So we know that this question is about the 何【なに】, and the "X" ...


4

I think this is a strange mixture of the ~とも/とは限らない construction and the interrogative + とも + ない construction. Although perfectly understandable, I feel this sentence is not well-formed. It should have been either of: あなたの身にも、いつかこのような恐怖が降りかからないとも限りません。 あなたの身にも、いつこのような恐怖が降りかかるとも知れません。 Here are some examples of interrogative + とも + 知れない/分からない from BCCWJ: ...


4

~でも in だれでも should be equated to であっても "even to be", so だれでも = だれであっても = "no matter who (s/he) is". Translating it as "anyone" is indeed a clever way, as it puts stress on that no one is exception. Grammatically, the particle is under the same category with は and such (取り立て助詞 "focus particle"), so here you can take it ...


4

They indeed seem to contradict each other. However, the rules described in the preceding pages should not be taken too literally. The book itself offers the following caveat in p286. 本来「のだ」が必要とされる文で「のだ」が使われないことがあります。この場合、「のだ」を使っても問題はないので、学習者は「「のだ」が不要になることもある」ということを知っていれば十分です。 As for the examples you copied from p287, the authors probably needed a few ...


3

I think you are comparing the wrong things. As you pointed out, どんな危険 is indeed a question. But どんな危険も no longer has anything to do with a question. Explaining the usage of も is really difficult as it carries a lot of nuance. The basic explanation (that you will find in most textbooks) is of course that も is used to list different things and group them ...


3

どなた is much more polite and should mostly be used to ask a person directly who they are. だれ can be used when asking someone about someone else indirectly, but would be very rude to ask someone directly(to the point of being insulting or starting a fight).


3

元気 means "fine" and お before 元気 describes politeness (to the listener = "you"). です is "be" and か makes it a question. You may notice that there is no subject, but it can be inferred to be "you", because it is a question. Therefore お元気ですか literally means "Are you fine?" By removing か, it might become "You are fine." but resulting お元気です is not natural, as ...


3

I'm Japanese. I try to help you. (My English is not good,so i explain briefly.) 何 is used when choices aren't shown. どれ is used when choices are shown. But,何 can be used when choices are shown. (1)何 English A:I will go shopping. Do you need anything? B:Then,buy some apples for me. Japanese A:買い物に行ってくるね。何か要る? B:じゃあリンゴを買ってきて。 (2)どれ English A:I'm back. I ...


3

There are various "WH" words in Japanese -- the question words, like the English "who, what, where, when, why, how" -- that shift in meaning when used together with the inclusive particle も. も in Japanese is sometimes translated like "even, also". In combination, it's also a bit like "-ever": 何 "what" + も "-ever" → "whatever", 誰 "who" + も "-ever" → "...


3

These so called こそあど言{こと}葉{ば} (ko-so-a-do words) are demonstratives (or 指示語{しじご} in Japanese), and you can think of them as placeholders for things that are common knowledge between the speaker and the listener, or in your case, as placeholders for the answers to your questions. 1. What are demonstratives Take a look at the following example sentences: ここ ...


3

I think you are an advanced learner of Japanese. This will be the reason why your teacher corrected 「日本の文化はだれでも楽しむものじゃないか?」to 「日本の文化はだれもが楽しむものじゃないか?」. It seems to me that even if the former sentence sounds a little awkward, it cannot be said to be grammatically wrong. And the phrases of だれでも楽しめる and だれもが楽しめる are grammatical and both sound quite natural. It ...


2

どれか is similar to 何か (something) or 誰か (somebody). どれか means one among several options. Example: この中のどれか、頂戴できましょうか. Can you give me one of these? どれも is similar to いつも (always) or どこも (everywhere). どれも means all options. Example: どれも見事だ。They are all beautiful. どれでも is similar to 誰でも (anyone) or 何でも (anything) どれでも means any one among several options. ...


2

彼はこれは何だと言ったか is not a complete sentence but a clause that's embedded in a sentence like 彼は(自分が)これは何だと言ったか覚えていなかった:"He didn't remember what he said it was". "Did he say this is something, or didn´t he say it ?" is expressed as あの人、これ が(/を) 何(か)だとか言ってた? それとも言ってなかった?(or …言ってませんでしたか?) or so. Using 言っていた instead of 言った is another point. (This is difficult to ...


2

It's worth separating the two examples as examples of different constructions to ask the same type of question. It will make more sense if you comprehend the following: X が (adjective/verb) か。 (X as subject「が」) (adjective/verb question「か」) なにいろが すきですか。 (what color is the subject) (do you like is the question) What color do you like? As you ...


2

This の is not the nominalizing の, it's the explanatory の, as in 「ちょっと話{はな}したいことがあるのですが。」"There is something I would like to talk to you about (explanatory tone)." When used in a question, it takes the reverse nuance of seeking an explanation, as in 「どこにいたの?」"Where were you? (seeking explanation)." In your example sentences, the の is technically unnecessary, ...


2

ここ means "this place" and it needs a locative marker で to mean "here" when it's combined with the predicate やっている. You can't use the form of a non-noda form followed with よ for interrogative sentences apart from slang. …かよ doesn't stand for a simple question but a rhetoric question to actually deny it. 何をマジやっている has two objects of 何 and マジ. You need some ...


2

As you might have learned with respect to the は in the phrase, the Japanese language, and specifically its grammar, is driven by a system of particles. In this case, you have probably yet to learn that there is a particle that corresponds to questions. This is the か particle, and is placed at the end of a sentence or phrase that is meant to be a question. ...


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