7

In the real world, a housewife who wrote ニッポン死ね on the Internet thread was really really angry at the fact she, actually her child, had been rejected by day nurseries without reasons. But, in Japan it is very common for parents to fail to find a day nursery for their child(ren) because most of the day nurseries have many more applicants than the designated ...


6

This ニッポン死ね is a reference to this anonymous post titled 保育園落ちた日本死ね!!!, and this 山岡 is obviously a reference to 山尾志桜里, a former member of 民主党. Although this is an anonymous blog post full of dirty words, Yamao used it to attack the current 自民党 government, and mass media covered it for quite some time. She received the buzzword-of-the-year 2016 for this ...


5

You can't easily cut ties with your family the way you can with others. Notice that the topic (は) is 家族の縁, not an omitted 私 (or other). So then the 他人 is contrasted with 家族, not with "me". It would be clearer if it was stated as 他人の縁, but the の縁 would be redundant, so it is left out there. So a more literal translation would be Ties with your family ...


5

Context. See the example below. Context. Historical present happens on per-sentence basis (i.e., it's about the tense of the main verb usually at the end of each sentence). When you see mixed tense within one sentence, that's probably related to relative tense. Historical present happens in English novels, but it's probably more common in Japanese novels. If ...


5

私には is 私に followed by the topic/contrast marker は. So yes, it can mean "to me" or "personally", but 私にとっては is often used for this purpose, too. See: Help with には and にとって Use 彼女 ("she") instead of 女性 ("woman"). I suppose it's a mere typo :) In the first sentence, you probably have to use は instead of が, because this sentence describes a general fact rather ...


5

At least from the one source I could find, there are some supplementary lines that may clarify things. だから俺の前でないてるのがお前じゃなくても、俺はーー と、その先のロレンスの言葉は出なかった。 ホロが傷ついたような顔をして、ロレンスの方を見つめていたからだ。 「・・・・・・お前、ずるくないか」 「ん、雌の特権じゃろ」 いけしゃあしゃあと言うので、ロレンスはかるkホロの頭を小突いたのだった。 At this point they're basically flirting... She's trying to act like she would cry in front of everyone ...


4

無理矢理 means forcibly and can be safely used with inanimate objects. In that case you can just forget the translation "against one's will". See examples on ALC. And why did you think "無理矢理 applied to the room"? This 無理矢理に modifies 入る because it's a standalone adverb.


4

...に、なりました。 ...に、なりました。 ...に、なりました。 ...に、なりました。 This is a fresh discovery that I have not ever thought it to be questionable as a Japanese at all. You could not hear the same phrase on TV broadcast, right? 「になりました」 is used to convey every happening event to the listeners who are not watching it. The reporter could say "ただいま午後{ごご}3時{じ}24分{ぷん}10秒{...


4

お前が言うな is a slangy set phrase which is loved by otaku. This phrase is so common that there's even a shortened form, おまいう/おまゆう. お前が言うな/おまゆう お前が言うなって英語でなんて言うの? So what's "the world of お前が言うな"? As a tsukkomi character, the protagonist has encountered similar situations so often that he felt there were even お前が言うなの世界, just as there are the typical ミステリーの世界, ...


4

Read 捕獲任務なのに殺す as one action, "(for A) to kill them although this is a capture mission", which as a whole is what B thinks is 駄目. The subject of 殺す is A (because A just said 死刑). This だから is more like "I told you!", "Oh, come on!" or "You don't understand?" rather than "So" or "Therefore". This usage is colloquial and is not listed on jisho, but 明鏡国語辞典 ...


4

After pushing aside questions about why you would doubt your teacher’s explanation and whether you are asking for a bad grade, I have decided to simply provide some information from this site. Kanji has (specific) meaning. Recently, ‘sparkling’ names (intentionally unusual names) are all the rage, but in ages past ateji wasn’t used. For example, ‘しんゆう’ can ...


4

Although both sentences could be translated as, "What is X?", a fuller explication reveals the differences. 何【なに】    が   X です  か。 what [SUBJ] X [is] [QUESTION] Grammatically, the "what" is the subject of this sentence -- the 何【なに】 is the word marked with が, the subject particle. So we know that this question is about the 何【なに】, and the "X" ...


4

母のように娘のように大切にしていた相手 means "someone that B cared for just like (B would do) B's mother, or daughter", "someone B cared for as if they were B's mother, or daughter." 「相手を母のように、(または)娘のように大切にする」 = "care for someone as if they were your mother or daughter" The sentence literally means... 「もっと強くもっと早くこの手を伸ばせていれば」 If I had been able to reach out my hand more ...


4

身 refers to the author of the blog article. 先の先まで見据えた末での選択 and 単に保身に走っただけ refer to Light's choice of not buying the "eyes". Your understanding of 末 is fine. 原作を知っている身としては先の先まで見据えた末での選択か、それとも単に保身に走っただけなのかはっきりとは判別できません。 As someone who knows the original manga, I cannot tell if this (=Light's choice) is a serious far-sighted decision or a result of mere ...


4

Aside from this usage, X + が/も + X + だから/なので/etc is a way to remind X as a reason for something. It roughly means "(as you know,) because of the (unusual) X". Examples: 時間も時間なので、今日は帰りましょう。 値段が値段ですし、たくさんは売れないと思います。 私は性格が性格なもので、よく人と言い争いになることがあります。 Your second question is harder to explain, but it's basically a kind of joke called セルフツッコミ, a tsukkomi made ...


4

あきらめ、怒り、非難の気持ちを含みながら、投げやりに言い捨てる感じで、「〇〇だ、〇〇!」「もう〇〇だ〇〇!」という表現が使われるのを見かけることがあります。人によって違うのかもしれませんが、「中止だ中止」というのを見ると、あきらめを伴って「もう中止に決定(したようなもの)だ!」とか「もう中止してしまえ!」などと言っているような感じがします。 例: 「辞任だ辞任!」(非難して「辞任しろ」と言ったりするときに) 「延期だ、延期!」(何かを延期させてしまえ、と言うときに) 「廃止だ廃止!」 「もう、離婚だ、離婚!」(夫婦喧嘩などで)


4

With a cursory glance at that sentence, I think it means something closer to 'Isn't it just that you can't express what you're thinking to people?' 自分の思ってること is 'a thing one is thinking', not necessarily in regards to themselves. 人 here just means 'people generally'; it's not あの人. 伝える is more 'to convey' or 'to express', and 伝えられない is indeed negative ...


4

Nothing indicates it's specifically 7000 "years", so this should be taken as a myth-esque, archaic-sounding way of saying "very long time too long to measure precisely". In other words, it appears to me that it's a fancy way of saying "countless ages", not "7000 years". This odd-looking expression should be loosely ...


3

So, as @Chocolate pointed out, it's ちょっとズレている, not ちょうズレる. Hiragana ちょう is too informal/comical in a serious analytic statement like this, and it does not semantically fit the previous context, either. (EDIT: Okay, the original source indeed says ちょうズレる, and this ちょう should mean とても here. I'm not the only native speaker who felt this ちょう was unnatural, but ...


3

Both interpretations are technically possible, but only the former seems natural to me. This is a dark and relatively silent forest, isn't it? 闇を飾るように is a fairly vague and poetic expression and I have never tried to distinguish sounds according to such a criterion. If it were something like 森がざわめく音だけが前から聞こえてくる, the sentence might seem ambiguous and there ...


3

It's referring to the girl. The source of your confusion seems to be interpreting 儚くて優しい As "fleetingly kind", but it is "fleeting and kind". This is reinforced by the fact that the immediately following sentence talks about how nice she was. どこまでも母親を愛する女の子の事を、 In regard to くて and why I am translating it as "and", see here and here. Edit: it is ...


3

付けた奴 by itself can mean both "the person who installed the cameras" and "the cameras someone installed", but since this 奴 works as the subject of another 付けた that follows, we can say this 奴 refers to a person. noun + を覚悟で is a set phrase that roughly means "(do something) at the risk of ~" (This を is often omitted even in writings. For example, 失敗覚悟で, ...


3

~ておく has several meanings, and in this case it means "to leave (status)" or "to do (something) for now / for the time being". 窓を開けておく can mean both "to leave the window open" and "to open the window beforehand." So saying ておく here implies he is going to win eventually in the future. Dropping おく and saying 引き分けってことにしてやる will not largely change the meaning in ...


3

This もう is "already". もう出発する。 I'll depart soon. もう出発した。 I already departed. This ている is not progressive. 終わる is an instant state-change verb (aka punctual verb) described here. "This planet is already (completely) finished." Yes this と is quotative. This と probably connects to a verb before this sentence. Sometimes the word order can be changed ...


3

The other answers including the past answers quoted are grammatically and logically correct, but the examples and their explanations are, I think, not sufficient, so I am going to add some information to correctly tell the nuance of Japanese. Though "にとっては" or "としては" is not exactly correspond to "to somebody or to something", they are generally used ...


3

"It's so annoying...so annoying. To be threatened like a weakling" sounds adequate. "It's so annoying...so annoying. The one who should be getting threatened (or scared) like a weakling should be..." does not. If I were writing a manga and wanted to convey the latter, I would either write it out as a full sentence (弱者のように脅かされるのは[whatever the MC refers to the ...


3

腹立たしい 腹立たしい 弱者のように脅かされるのは I would read it as a rhetorical anastrophe/inversion (倒置). The normal word order would be: 弱者のように脅かされるのは 腹立たしい (腹立たしい)。 ... which would sound less emotional and emphatic, with less rhetorical effect. So it means: "It's so annoying...so annoying... to be threatened like a weakling."


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