70

Thanks to @Chocolate, I was able to learn what this word means, which is roughly that something was funny. Here are a couple sources: http://wikiwiki.jp/himoteplus/?%C1%F0%C0%B8%A4%A8%A4%BF http://www.logsoku.com/r/livejupiter/1340676537/ Why does it mean something was funny? Well, as discussed in this question, strings of w (such as wwwwww) express ...


44

As you can see from these references: http://netyougo.com/twitter/1652.html http://www.paradisearmy.com/doujin/pasok_8888.htm Streams of the number eight such as 8888 represent applause. They're read パチパチ, the sound of hands clapping together one after another in applause, as in the phrase パチパチと拍手する. The second reference above also explains the derived ...


23

人 represents two hands pressed together. It appears in many kaomoji. In this context it represents praying hands (合掌), a traditional Buddhism/Shinto praying gesture. It can also mean more casual "please".


21

I read your question "Do Japanese people see [tsu] as a smiling face" and read over the question several times before I got it. And I'm not a native Japanese reader (or speaker). Just like your ت (which sort of looks like a smiling face to me) and the German ü (to Japanese eyes, say), the Japanese ツ doesn't look like a smiling face to any eye who has become ...


19

🈂 is for サービス, as in receiving something for free. However, I've seen several other sources say this means "service charge", which is the complete opposite of free. So I'm not positive if it's one or the other, or possibly either depending on the context. 🈁 is just for ここ (here). Here's a list of some other common ones.


18

リア充 is different from "playboy". リア充: an internet meme constructed from リアル (real) + 充実【じゅうじつ】 (fulfill). a person who is successful or fulfilled in real life (vs. an otaku who is living in the world of anime or video games). In most cases this refers to someone who has a lover, used with some sense of jealousy. Sometimes this is used to refer to any "non-...


15

It is a shortening of 棒読み and means speaking in monotone. I.e. if it is an apology or compliment then it is not sincere.


14

^^; It's a Japanese emoticon (顔文字) that developed into this emoji 😅 (U+1F605 SMILING FACE WITH OPEN MOUTH AND COLD SWEAT). In Japanese, such expression is called 苦笑い (Google images), which people make when they can't smile wholeheartedly because of some mixed feelings, or they actually has something to say, but let it go with the flow for the time being. ...


12

Great research! Well, literal (笑) someday changed into 'w' especially in 2ch and such, and some people don't like ones who uses too many of them, like, ちょっwwwwwwwwwww, (this must be like "hey, wait a minulollollollollol") and they started saying 草生えすぎ, or using the AA you put above, frowned (・ω・) mowing the lawn. So now they also use 草生えた just instead of ...


12

A コラ (or コラ画像) can roughly be devided into two categories: A コラ that looks as if it were genuine. For example, an image of an anime character, porn actress, etc., whose head is skillfully replaced with the head of someone else. Making a good コラ in this sense requires a great amount of time and skill. A コラ that is meant to be served as a pure joke, as in #...


12

次{つぎ}行{い}ってみよう is a famous phrase used by a Japanese comedian いかりや長{ちょう}介{すけ}. IIRC this phrase caught on in the late 1970's. He used this catchphrase frequently in his TV comedy show, at the end of many comedy bits. (picture taken from here) It literally means "Let's go to the next segment (scene, chapter, etc.)", which is not really funny by itself. ...


12

How about 「[視聴]{しちょう}[回数]{かいすう}」? I think [再生]{さいせい}回数 would also work.


11

This is usually not intended to be read aloud, but the most prevailing "reading" is not わらう but わら. For example, ww is わらわら. 笑うを意味する「www」をなんて読んでる? 「wは読まずに前の文を笑いながら」「わらわらわら」 You can mainly hear this pronunciation on live streaming sites such as ニコニコ生放送 where hosts often configure screen readers to read visitors' comments aloud. I have read somewhere that /...


11

That P (simply read ピー) stands for プロデューサー ("Producer"). Traditionally, P has been used like a name suffix for a super-high executive in the showbiz/broadcasting/anime industry (someone even higher than a "D", or 監督/director). However, after the success of the Idolm@aster franchise, where a "producer" has a role closer to that ...


11

Good point. It's actually unpossible. 「アッ」と発声した後息を溜める所作を表現したものと思われるが、「ッ」の後に「ー」が続くという発声の不可能性からネットミームとしてウケ、やがて同性愛関係で「ア」のつく発声を表記する際に多用されるようになった。 (source) While supposed to be transcription of a gasp after uttering アッ, its impossibility of vocalization, that a ー follows a ッ, has made it viral as an internet meme, eventually becoming a popular way to transcribe ...


10

According to the ja.wikipedia page on GKBR, it can be ゴキブリ as well as: ガクガクブルブル - 恐怖で震えるさまを表す擬態語。 So it'd be "GaKu BuRu," onomatopoeia that represents fearful trembling. It's some 2ch slang, of course. Here also is an entry on the nicovideo dictionary


10

落ちます is closer to "gotta go now." It usually means not returning for the day, unless otherwise modified by しばらく, ちょっと, 30分くらい, 飯食ってくるので, etc. A typical response for 落ちます would be おやすみなさい, また明日, お疲れ様, etc. 後で usually indicates the person who said this somehow knows the other person is coming back relatively soon. It's not a typical response for 落ちます modified ...


9

I never see it used this way in Japanese emoticons, and I just went ahead and checked every single entry for かおもじ in Google's Windows Japanese IME, and there wasn't a single example of one using it as a face.


9

It is internet slang that is used to indicate that the rest of the sentence has been omitted for one reason or another, usually to some comedic effect. The answer is explained in detail on this site: http://imimatome.com/netyogonoimi/ry.html If the site is forbidden, try viewing a cached version. 最後までハッキリと言わない時に使う、謙虚なネット用語です(違 ハッキリ言わない方が面白いことがあったり、...


9

It's not uncommon to see people use apparently derogatory words among themselves to increase the togetherness of community, and so does Japanese internet society, as a long tradition. You can find a number of such Japanese memes like これはひどい "that's terrible", マジキチ "absolutely crazy", 作者は病気 "the author's sick" etc. which actually praising their eccentricity ...


9

An interesting slang communication system that's been around since 2009 is Pseudo-Chinese ([偽中国語]{にせちゅうごくご}), which is basically Japanese sentences stripped of all kana (although critical kana content words may be replaced with archaic kanji spellings). The kanji is in Japanese grammatical order but the text superficially appears like Chinese. For example, ...


9

Is this a thing ever done in Japanese text If you specifically mean "replacing B/C (and only B and C) with the red/squared emoji 🅱️", then, no, that has never been a thing in Japan. I did not know such a phenomenon until today, and its cultural background (according to this) is not something Japanese people are familiar with. Of course people can read 🅱️🅰...


8

On the 3rd Google page I have found this blog post that has more information: 僕が言ってもそうなんだけど、最近いわゆる「おま言う」が多すぎて。 テレビ見てたり、文章読んでたり、はたまたツイッターの書き込みを覗いたり。 この世には「おま言う」、つまり「お前が言うな」が多すぎて、僕も出来るだけそう思われない生き方をしなくちゃならないなと思った。 So おま言う is the abbreviation of お前が言うな. Thanks to oldergod for pointing out that the meaning is: 'shut up, you are not in a position to say ...


8

It is now clear that 煜 was never intended to mean anything related to the kanji. In that sense it is a typo introduced by reading a 携帯 message on a computer. I did find an alternative to the banana hypothesis, though: 煜 maps to the smiley face (:D) on the SoftBank iPhone (see the middle character):


8

It's pretty much self explanatory: a shitty reply. I'm not aware of what shitpost means, but looking at the definitions online, I would say they are quite similar. The difference is that this only relates to replies. This term is mostly used in regards to replies on Twitter that are irritating, that are boring, that amount to nothing. Some people may or may ...


8

Looks like it's a kind of pun, or rather, 釣りタイトル. The slang word 電凸 usually means 電話で突撃 as the Wikipedia article says, but in this video, this title actually means something like 電車に突入. (凸 is a slangy kanji replacement of 突 used among some net users.) ガチの means "real", "serious". Everyone will understand what 電凸 actually means in this video only after ...


8

納豆を食べることができなさすぎる/食べられなさすぎる means "I can't eat natto at all" or "I am so terribly bad at natto", but it's a humorous slangy expression rather than a standard sentence. It's fine as the catchy title of a blog post or a light novel, but we should be using 全く/全然できない most of the time. In general, ~すぎる is occasionally used as a humorous intensifier these days. It ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible