30

No, やれ{HL}やれ{HL} is not an onomatopoeia but an interjection. It doesn't symbolize any sound or state, and cannot used like other onomatopoeiae: × やれやれという音を立てて × やれやれした様子で But as you said, it's true that this word has no fixed translation in English. For example, Haruki Murakami is known to use this expression repeatedly as one of his signature style, ...


11

Both すみません and ごめんなさい mean sorry. However, there is a slight difference: ごめんなさい is an apologetic sorry. It's used when you've clearly done something WRONG, and is a very straightforward, "I'm sorry". すみません is a subtle sorry. You say this simply because you feel bad, guilty, or even embarrassed. It's more of a "sorry for the inconvenience" or "sorry for the ...


11

「どれ腹{はら}の傷{きず}をおみせ、薬草{やくそう}をぬってあげよう。」 You are "seeing" the wrong 「どれ」 here, which is the 「どれ」("which one") from こそあど. This 「どれ」 is an interjection meaning "now", "well", "let's see", etc. It is most often used when checking on or taking a look at something. We also say 「どら」、「どれどれ」, etc. for the same purpose. "Now, let me see the wound on your tummy. ...


10

やれ、やれ is an interjection often uttered when ① you are relieved from a burden or mental pressure, or ② when you have some burden or a little problem ahead, for example: ①やれやれ、[一仕事]{ひとしごと}終わった - Oh boy, I’ve finished this job. やれやれ、やっと[飯]{めし}が[炊]{た}けた - Here we go! Rice is done. やれやれ、借金も終わって[肩]{かた}の[荷]{に}が[下]{お}りた - Thank God. I settled the loans. I'm now ...


8

As @jovanni said: クソ literally means "shit" (feces), as well as being used as an interjection ("Shit!") in essentially the same way it's used in English. しまった is also an interjection but is not vulgar. It's also not as colloquial as クソ. It comes from the word しまう, which means "to finish ...; to do ... completely" (usually with a connotation of reluctance or ...


8

Judging from the context you provided, 「いんやぁ」 would have to be the informal pronunciation of 「いやあ」, which is an exclamation of surprise. 「ん」 quite often appears in a similar fashion for emphasis in colloquial speech. 「すんごい」 for 「すごい」, 「うんめえ」 for 「うめえ」, etc.


8

According to 明鏡国語辞典: なんと【何と】 🈔〘感〙強い驚きや感動の気持ちを表すときに発する語。「なんと、できたではないか。」 The なんと in your sentence is a 感動詞(interjection), not a 副詞(adverb). It is uttered to express one's surprise or amazement. This なんと cannot be rephrased as なんて, and can mean "Believe it or not", "To my surprise", "Surprisingly enough", etc. Examples from Kenkyusha's New Japanese-...


8

Yes, きゃー represents screams of higher tone, and is clearly feminine or childlike. 黄色い声 is usually きゃー. Gay characters often say きゃー in manga, too. ぎゃー, on the other hand, is not necessarily masculine. When female characters use ぎゃー, it's usually bolder, more urgent, or stronger than きゃー (for example, a dying scream). In general, voiced consonants tend to ...


7

I think the following come closest when you realize something you didn't anticipate (or at least you pretend not to have anticipated, e.g. when you are being polite): (あぁ) そっか Of course! I never noticed! when you had confirmed something you did anticipate: やっぱりね Of course! I knew it!


7

The 3 have very similar meaning that even Japanese sometimes can't distinguish. おや It just describe surprising. あら It's almost the same as おや but feminine. あれ It's slightly different, it means surprising when a difference is found with something, like your memory. e.g. あれ? an egg should have been in refrigerator! who ate it!


6

As an interjection, they have totally different meanings. As you say, "まあ!" corresponds to "Oh my!" and is decidedly female. But, "さあ" can be used only in this way (I think): A: "Shouldn't we start now? B: "oh, I don't know. . . ." A: "さあ! (C'mon!)" In other words, さあ indicates encouragement or invitation. You sometimes hear "さあさあ!", which is just a ...


5

Yes, saying those as the very first word after the stimulus is very common even in real life. 痛【いた】っ! 痛たたた… いててて… 寒【さむ】っ! 臭【くさ】っ! 熱【あつ】っ! 熱つつつ… あちちち… うるさっ! 汚【きたな】っ! 痒【かゆ】っ! 旨【うま】っ! We don't say 寒むむむむ or 臭ささささ for some reason... perhaps because they're difficult to pronounce? And as you can see in the last example, you can sometimes ...


5

Since you "often hear it", it's probably not the sentence-ending particle but filler さ, aka 間投助詞 (interjectional particle) in Japanese terminology. In that case, anyway, it's a verbal filler to keep conversation that doesn't have any meanings or nuances unlike なんか, まぁ or "like". This filler さ always follows some words, never precedes or stands alone, as you ...


4

おい is basically "Hey" or "Yo", but it's a very rude and rough way to stop a stranger. I would say you should never use it, unless you are very upset and/or want to pick a fight with someone. Probably she thought he was a high schooler, at least partly because he obviously didn't know how to speak politely. Or perhaps she felt he was in his "rebellious phase"...


4

The short answer is 'no'. You would sound very strange if you said 「いけません」 as an interjection. It would be just too funny. 「いけません」 is basically a phrase you say to another person, not to yourself. You say it when you think something is no good or when you want to stop someone from doing something that you do not think is good. When we say things like 「...


4

This type of いい (or いいか, いいですか, etc) is used before the important information is conveyed, to draw the listener's attention. This can be safely translated as "mind you", "listen" or "remember". "Pay attention" also seems to be a good translation to me. The question mark at the end of the sentence represents the rising tone of the speaker, and it's just ...


4

そう This is an abbreviation of そうか, そうですか or そうなんだ, whose meaning is "Is that so" or "I see". So そう is a common reply when you heard something new. Be careful that sometimes it sounds like the speaker is not interested in what he/she heard, because そう does not include any emotion or opinion of the speaker. ああ There are a few usages of ああ: To express ...


4

If I get your question right, さあ Can mean : Who knows / I don't know Ok now/ there we go And perhaps a few more, depending on the intonation. Example: Aさん:この人は誰?Bさん:さあね~。 Mr. A : Who is that? Mr. B : Who knows. まあ Can mean : Now now(mother reassuring kid) Sort of, kinda. oh, my!(Usually used by baasan) And perhaps ...


4

It definitely means 最低, pronounced さいてい. Writing it this way emphasis on the slang way of speaking of the character, especially with the っ. The author could have written it 最低, which is the proper way of writing it this word, but it would have less power. Remember as well that in Japanese the えい is exactly pronounced the same way as えー.


4

It sounds like an intentionally odd or silly rendering of あれれ?, which is itself a mildly exaggerated version of あれ(っ)?, a normal expression of surprise. Your guess about this is correct. The rest of your guess is actually a bit less so - 本当にないっすか is 'is it really not there?', and おかしいなー is closer to 'that's strange' (it's not an adverb).


4

You can say: うーん、素晴らしい! (neutral) んー、素晴らしい! (casual) うーむ、素晴らしい! (pompous) ふーむ、素晴らしい! (pompous) Note that the actual pronunciations of these う/ふ/む may be different from what you already know. These interjections are often pronounced just like English "mmm" or "hmmm". See: IPA for ふーん/んふふ (pronounced with your mouth closed) and Difference between うーん and ううん


4

I love this comic too. Mu mu mu expresses frustration in a calm way.


4

Saying さあ means you are expecting the listener to do or start something in response, like "hey" or "come on". So "さあ、おやすみなさい" would sound like you're urging someone, like "Hey, time to go to bed!" If you just want to add the nuance of "okay" or "now", それじゃ/じゃあ/それでは/では is the correct choice. それじゃ/じゃあ/それでは/では is used to indicate it's time to go (back) to an ...


3

ちがう, いえ, いや As you know, these three all have the meaning of "no," if used as interjections. First, ちがう has a stronger nuance of negation (close to "you're wrong"), compared to the others. I'm not sure if it is an interjection; ちがう can be interpreted as a complete sentence which consists of a single verb ちがう. いえ and いや are the same in the level of ...


3

Do 「チェ」 「ちぇ」 occur only in 外来語のみ ? ? ? No. There are very few and marginal occurrences in (Standard) Japanese, such as ちっちぇえ (vulgar form of ちっちゃい). Besides, the syllable is more widely used in some dialects, notably in some Kyushu dialects, しぇ [[ɕe]] and ちぇ [[tɕe]] systematically correspond to せ [[se]] and て [[te]] in Tokyo, respectively. How old is the ...


3

It's an interjection that mean kind like There you/he go again.... But as you said it's difficult to translate.


3

Yes, [之助]{の・すけ} is appended to [承知]{しょう・ち} in order to make the word sound humorous, regardless of whether it actually sounds funny or not. It's a kind of play on words. During the Edo period ([江戸]{え・ど}[時代]{じ・だい} 1603 - 1868), many words were modified for fun. Turning a plain word into a name-style word without changing the meaning (or with growing the ...


3

@Choko has the answer, it seems that the correct expression is: おきばりなさって Some more examples: ほな、あんじょうおきばりなさってサービスの練習しとくなはれ! (http://fresco.blog.tennis365.net/archives/day/20101222.html) みなさんも新年度っすてきにおきばりなさってくださいね (http://www.tv-asahi.co.jp/reading/sanpo_hagino/date/2012/04/01/)


3

The doctor is not surprised. すわ in this context is an old interjection used like いざ, さあ, そら, etc. (I didn't know it has the kanji 驚破. Looks like it's an ateji, and 泉鏡花 liked it.) See the second definition from 大辞林 第三版: すわ ( 感 ) ① 突然の出来事などに驚いて発する語。 「 -一大事」 ② 他人の注意を喚起する語。 「 -見給へとて、古狸をなげ出いだしたりけり/著聞 17」 This 望む means "to face (a situation)", and is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible