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5

The double negation of i-adjectives not only exists, but it is quite commonly used among us native speakers when expressing opinions indirectly. Take 「おいしい」 ("tasty") for example, by far the most common double-negative form would be: 「おいしくなくはない」 which means: "(the food) is okay/passable if not great" That sounds fairly indirect, doesn't it? The ...


2

Yes, the conjugation rule is consistent with all the い-adjectives. There are a few notable exceptional cases where they can also syntactically be nouns: 近い→近く: adjectival: 近くのX - the nearby X noun: Xの近く - the vicinity of X 多い→多く: adjectival: 多くのX


9

there is perhaps some historical connection between the く sound and い sound, either phonologically or semantically. I think the answer from blutorange addresses this. Maybe these two classes of words [〜い adjectives and 〜く verbs] diverged from the same class of words somehow? I'll disagree with blutorange about this part, as his answer is (I believe) ...


2

Yes, for example consider the beginning of 枕草子【まくらのそうし】: 美【うつく】しきもの。瓜【うり】に描【か】きたる稚児【ちご】の顔【かお】。 If you rewrite the adjective and verb forms to their modern form: 美しいもの。瓜に描いてある稚児の顔。 Observe that an adjective such as 美しい was originally 美しき (before a noun, 美し at the end of a sentence), with a shift of き→い, see イ音便. 咲いて was originally 咲きて, where you can ...


5

I'm the one who wrote the majority of that article (some ~10 years ago!), so I apologize if that section was a bit confusing when comparing the Kagoshima forms to their standard Japanese counterparts. As @mamster pointed out, for some of the entries in that table, the root word used in Kagoshima is completely different from that used in standard Japanese. ...


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