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Posted as an answer as requested (and yes the 'highly authoritative' was sacarstic). According to this highly authoritative page the last colour is 紫. It gives 赤・オレンジ・黄・緑・青・藍(あい)・紫(むらさき)


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忙しい or other states of being (not limited to i-adjectives) have some duration for which the state remains. On the other hand, に stands for a pinpoint time during the date within the day. I mean, a day in particular has 24 hours, that sounds like a range to me 14日 can be a time period that has width, but 14日に indicates a point in the 14th day. Moreover, ...


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For: それ は おそくない くるま です。 the basic sentence is それは くるま です That is a car. But おそくない modifies くるま to give "that is a car which is not slow". For: それ は おそい くるま じゃ ありません。 the basic sentence is それは くるま じゃありません That is not a car But おそい modifies くるま to give "that is not a car which is slow". So the main difference is that in the first ...


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The cut down sentence is: 大学はチェックする人を多くします。 The universities will make sure there are a lot of people to check (on the students) Literally "The universities will make the people doing the checking many". This usage of adverbs with する happens a lot, and you can't normally translate the adverb as an English adverb without it sounding really awkward;...


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Old and Classical Japanese adjectives Let's look just at the ones that end in ~い in modern Japanese, classed as 形容詞【けいようし】 in mainstream Japanese-language grammars. This includes the ~ましい adjectives you mention in your question, while excluding ~な adjectives (technically 形容【けいよう】動詞【どうし】) like 静【しず】か or 大胆【だいたん】. The Japanese Wikipedia has a brief ...


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You are correct. The "stem" of a word is the part that remains the same when you conjugate it or otherwise combine it with other words. So for verbs, the ます-stem is what's left when you remove the ます from the ます form (which for ichidan verbs is the same as removing the る from the plain form, but that doesn't extend to godan or irregular verbs). So, ...


3

i-adjectives like やすい turn into adverbs via the rule -i → -ku for example やすい → やすく 早い → 早く 新しい → 新しく The i-adjective やすい can attach as a suffix to the masu-stem of a verb like 分かる, but the result 分かりやすい is grammatically still an i-adjective and in the phrase 分かりやすくいえば 分かりやすく is an adverb for the verb いう (here in the form いえば). (Similarly, 早くいう "to ...


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Let me show my idea to explain this really difficult question. After the “(Absolute time)に” we basically expect something happening or something changed. Adjectives and adjectival nouns are just for describing status of something and that’s far from happening, that's probably why it doesn’t fit in the sentences like your example. In order to grasp this idea ...


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Coining new godan verbs (u-verbs) is far from exceptional in modern Japanese, and we have many related questions on this site. What are the principles behind turning foreign language words into verbs?(e.g. ググる and サボる) Characteristics of 'loan word root + る' verbs Can you form verbs from 擬態語 or 擬音語 by adding -る? Meaning and validity of 雪ってる What ...


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The two people already know what they are talking about, so they can safely omit the subject and say "大きいですか?" or "綺麗ですか?". But that's all you can do safely. "大きいか?" is a grammatical question, but it always sounds very blunt and unfriendly. This sounds almost like you are a stubborn dwarf blacksmith living alone in a cave. It's inappropriate not only in ...


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Problem I think the confusion comes from the fact that both kind of words are labelled as い-adjectives and な-adjectives, creating the illusion or expectation that both types of words function grammatically in the same way, and that where you would use い for one type, you can expect to use な for the other. This expectation is not true. Let's compare both ...


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I think you may occasionally hear some ギャル say これ美味しくなくない? when, for example, going to a highly reviewed restaurant, being somewhat disappointed by the food, then asking a friend for affirmation. In normal speech, however, you will quite commonly hear people say double negatives with a particle in between. 美味しくなくはない。 It doesn't taste bad. 忙しくなくはない。 I wouldn'...


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Yes, [potential form in te-form] + [i-adjective] is a common pattern. For example 逢えて嬉しい(です) I'm glad we met / I'm glad we were able to meet 消防車に乗れて楽しかった(です) Being able to get on a fire truck was fun From a grammatical point of view, you cannot combine a verb in its basic form (e.g. 見られる) with an i-adjective / adjectival verb (e.g. 嬉しい). You could ...


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It's a compound word from the stem of あざとい combined with かわいい, in other words, one word. Edit: It means to be cute in a manner that you boldly show yourself that way.


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First, as a basic rule, が and の are interchangeable in relative clauses (with a few restrictions). 動きの鈍った魔物 and 動きが鈍った魔物 are totally interchangeable, and 動きが鈍い魔物 and 動きの鈍い魔物 are totally interchangeable, too. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? Then what's the difference between 動きが鈍った魔物 and 動きが鈍い魔物? Simply, the former refers to monsters that are ...


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分かりやすく簡潔に書くのは難しいですよね Writing simply and concisely is difficult, isn't it? Both 分かりやすく and 簡潔に are acting adverbially to modify 書く. Let's start with why you wouldn't use を here. を marks the object of the verb, i.e. it marks the thing that actually gets written, for example, a letter, a poem etc. It doesn't make sense to 'write a brevity' so を is not the ...


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From a grammatical point of view you can make double or triple or whatever-iple negations, though it's not something you'd throw in a normal conversation. As an example from Ace Attorney: -そんなことないよ。 -そんなことなくないッ! -そんなことなくなくない! -そんなことなくなくなくなくなく... With exception of comic effect I hardly can imagine situation where you may need this.


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