17

Adding -さん is definitely not conventional as a formal Japanese name card. But English-only name cards are not conventional in the first place, and hardly sticking to the traditional style may not be always good for a startup. Getting to know how to call each other is one of the difficult tasks in foreign communications. If I received a name card with ムルさん on ...


6

It's ご趣味. As a general rule for nouns, ご beautifies a word which uses the on-yomi (e.g. ご質問 or ご主人), while お beautifies a word which uses the kun-yomi (e.g. お米 or お金).


6

In ancient Japanese, honorific verbs was used by very noble people to refer to their own actions (自尊敬語, "self-honorifics"). But you won't see this unless you learn archaic Japanese seriously. In modern Japanese, even Prime Minister and Emperor use humble verbs properly to refer to their own actions. You may see a high person use humble verbs to refer to ...


6

There are a number of exceptions regarding the usage of お/ご, and, ultimately, you have to learn them individually. According to a survey by Tanaka (1972) based on the word usage of newspapers, お attaches to a kango roughly 20% of the time, but ご very rarely attaches to a wago (they identified only ごもっとも and ごゆっくり). Even a long academic article dedicated for ...


5

First, according to Wikipedia, this 宮さん is not Emperor but Prince Arisugawa. The most formal and polite way to address him is 有栖川親王殿下{ありすがわしんのうでんか} ("His Imperial Highness Prince Arisugawa"), or 殿下{でんか} ("His Highness") for short. The formality of さん and 様 has not changed. Judging from the lyrics, the Prince was marching in some rural area, and the person ...


3

In Japanese, the social norm is to call a person's name with an honorific, unless they have expressly asked you not to, even when referencing something using their name. Not using an honorific implies a level of intimacy that might not be there, which could come across as rude. In addition, when speaking to someone, unless they have asked you to call them ...


3

I have just checked the matter in my Handbook of Japanese Phonetics and Phonology, Chapter 11 ‘The Phonology of Japanese Accent’ (as it describes, say, the prosody of [氏]{し} or [家]{け} suffixes, it would perhaps be and interesting read to you as well). It refers to the following two primary sources: The MIT dissertation by William J. Poser, 1984: The ...


2

An 一般人 usually use no name suffix whatsoever when they plainly talk about someone they know only via TV or the internet. That is, you can safely do 呼び捨て. If you used さん on a regular basis, you would sound as if you were a 芸能人 or 業界人 yourself. But there are exceptions. Needless to say, when you have a chance to speak to a celebrity or someone working with ...


2

One of the primary mechanics for showing politeness and respect in any language is the use of increasingly indirect expressions. Consider the following in English: Gimme that Give me that Please give me that It would be great if you gave me that It would be great if you could give me that It would be greatly appreciated if I could have that One would be ...


2

Yes, but in this case it is sarcastic by being too polite.


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