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15

During the Edo period, villages traditionally had 10 communal activities: 冠 - 成人式 - coming of age ceremony 婚 - marriage 建築 - helping with building/repairing 病気 - helping when sick 水害 - helping during flooding/water damage 旅行 - travel 出産 - giving birth 年忌 - death anniversaries 葬式 - funeral service 火事 - fire fighting However, when ...


13

I'm assuming that this is a question on the different shapes of the「⻍・⻌」component of「道」. For reference, the glyph origin of「⻍・⻌」is shown below via the character「過」.「⻍・⻌」is a merger between「彳」and「止」;「止」eventually became drastically simplified, but「彳」still retains most of its structure in the print form, while slightly simplified in the handwritten form. ...


11

I assume you're specifically talking about kanji/hanzi glyphs. (Hiragana are obviously more cursive.) Basically the overall appearances of typical Chinese hanzi and Japanese kanji fonts are not significantly different in terms of line width, roundness, etc., just as English "A", French "A" and German "A" are rendered the same. If you compare recent ...


10

As far as Japanese is concerned, loanwords (外来語) usually refer to words brought into Japan from countries other than China and written in katakana. But strictly speaking, it depends on how you define loanwords. Many on-yomi Sino-Japanese words had been around even before Japanese people learned how to write their own native words, so IMHO it doesn't make ...


7

To be fair, 本 = 「細長いもの」is a really popular explanation (note that is does not imply anything about being round, I think that it is an usual extrapolation due to the fact that physical objects that are long and thin are usually cylindrical). But many usages actually go against this explanation, or a least do not fall into that classification. Consider the ...


5

「[厚]{こう}」(thick, large, deep, strong) is comprised of semantic「厂」(cliff) and simultaneously semantic and phonetic「[𣆪]{こう}」(salt container shaped with a wide mouth and narrow neck > thick, strong flavour of salt). The character「厚」was originally used to describe the wideness and deepness of lofty hills and mountains. 「𣆪」was a character that fell into disuse ...


5

You'd normally see/hear... or, you'd normally be expected to use, in formal situations: (verb) 知らない -> 知りません (noun+copula / na-adjective) ではない -> ではありません/じゃありません (i-adjective) 大きくない -> 大きくありません You'd see/hear ~ないです in rather informal situations, like casual conversation: (verb) 知らない -> 知らないです (noun+copula / na-adjective) ではない/じゃない -> ではないです/...


5

I basically agree with @naruto's answer - the main reason is that if a Japanese designer chose a relatively unique Japanese font for design aesthetics, it is normally a challenge to get a matching Chinese font. If Simplified Chinese is used as the Chinese text, this then becomes extremely challenging. For the photo in the question, to match the "antique" ...


4

But it is also common in cosmogonies to say the gods created our land first and foremost, and the rest of the planet is just an afterthought to use up left-over materials, Honshū may then have been 元州. Interestingly, according to the traditional legends, Honshū was created last out of the eight islands. The earliest references to「本州」I could find dates back ...


4

Apples to apples, the on-yomi equivalent to 寺{てら} would be 寺院{じいん}. It would be just as unusual to see ご寺院 as ご神社. I think by adding ご, it almost sounds like the 寺院 or 神社 belongs to the person you are addressing, and since neither one is likely to belong to a single person, the construction sounds unnatural. On the other hand the kun-yomi equivalent of 神社 ...


3

English/Latin letters have similar differences between hand-written and printed forms. (Think about how most people would write the letter 'a' or the number '4') Historically, many of the differences between type forms and hand-written forms come from the technology used for printing. Obviously, hand-writing pre-dates printing, so the hand-written form ...


2

I think you're getting confused by the differences in the English translations. The function of nominalizing の in both of your examples is identical: it nominalizes the preceding verbal phrase. English requires various coordinating pieces to connect phrases, things like "that" and "the one who". The の works a bit like these coordinating pieces in English. ...


2

This is a what I found in 成り立ちで知る漢字のおもしろ世界: 道具・家・まち編 (by 伊東信夫). Translation is by me, so might not be perfect, but here it goes: 「厚」is formed of 「厂」(がんだれ、cliff radical)、「子」and 「日」, the last two being combined. Although 「厂」usually means ''cliff'' (in fact being the bare minimum version of 「崖」), it here has the same meaning as 「宀」(ベン), namely "the mausoleum ...


2

As you note, there are two modern patterns for spelling //oː// in kana: [CONSONANT or VOWEL KANA ending in //o//] + お, or + う. For the volitional ending in う This was originally the volitional auxiliary / suffix む, which attached to the irrealis or 未然形【みぜんけい】 ("hasn't happened yet") form. For 四段活用【よだんかつよう】 verbs, the irrealis ends in //a//, so the ...


2

The premise of your question – that in native Japanese words long "o" sounds are always spelled by adding お rather than by adding う – is simply incorrect. (Consider the verb [儲ける]{もうける} and the nouns [お父さん]{おとうさん} and [素人]{しろうと}, for example.) That said, the う that occurs in the volitional form ending does in fact derive from the auxiliary verb む, as ...


2

Probably due to Kuroshio's strong current, they improve transportation of heat and things. The lyricist wanted to encourage troops mentioning 黒潮. My interpretation is the following : 寄せる黒潮 何と見る The Kuroshio is forthcoming, how do you feel about that?(Why don't you get stoked!?) It sounds like a typical phrase of rock concert like Metallica. Possibly 陸軍{...


2

Note: This answer is more in response to you saying you want it to be easier to understand, as opposed to the interest in the history. This isn't backed up by any research, but the way I think about it is similar to the で used when stringing together adjectival nouns: きれいで賑{にぎ}やかなまちだね? - It's a pretty and lively town, right? Similar to て-forms, I see the ...


1

黒潮 is a familiar term to Japanese people (elementary school students learn it at school), and there was a warship called 黒潮 and a kisha club called 黒潮会. It obviously has an image of "(warm,) fast and strong", but beyond this, I don't think there is an episode or implication widely shared among Japanese people. 潮【うしお】 is a word sometimes used in poetry to ...


1

The history has been covered previously as mentioned in a comment by broccoli forest, so I'll answer your question about its usage. So: Yes, it can be used in kun-yomi, even if combinations like 掻っ攫う are ignored.「全く」,「全{まっと}うする」 and 「驀地{まっしぐら}」 are the only ones I could come up with off the top of my head, but I'm sure I've seen other similar words as well....


1

I think you are answering your own question in part. Most compound words use a reading that derives from Chinese but remember that Japanese was its own language already before it drew from the Chinese writing system, as far as I know. It might have adopted many loanwords but it also used onyomi reading for many existing Japanese words. That is, in part, why ...


1

Does THIS answer your question? Seems that there are a number of possible explanations though... Parts of the phone, or the phone itself were cylindrical Voice was transmitted via wires (long and thin) The idea of a "message" where a written letter would be rolled up into a cylinder (letter -> telegraph -> telephone)


1

In 1860, Fukuzawa Yukichi published English-Japanese Dictionary ("Zōtei Kaei Tsūgo"). It was his first publication. He bought English-Chinese Dictionary ("Kaei Tsūgo") in San Francisco in 1860. He translated it to Japanese and he added the Japanese translations to the original textbook. In his book, he invented the new Japanese characters VU (ヴ) to represent ...


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