15

That’s likely not a kanji, but rather a hiragana そ (so) in its split/handwritten form (like on the right here):


13

「こんばんみ」 is a greeting presumably created and definitely made popular by comedian ビビる大木 a couple of decades ago. As always, some people like to mimic whatever schtick they hear on TV that they find "cool" or simply "new". 「こんばんみ」 was even more popular a decade or two ago than it is now. I was a bit surprised to hear you still hear/see it often enough. ...


10

This is related to the fact that 今日 and 明日 have two readings. According to the July 2008 issue of 放送研究と調査: 放送で,「今年」を「ことし」と表記する理由 「今年」と漢字で書いた場合,「ことし」と読んだらよいのか,「こんねん」と読んだらよいのか,わからなかったり,迷ったりするおそれがある。そのため,放送では「ことし」と,ひらがな書きにすることにしている。同じように「今日(きょう/こんにち)」「明日(あす/みょうにち)」「昨日(きのう/さくじつ)」なども,「きょう」「あす」「きのう」と,ひらがなで表記するようにしている。 EDIT: This is NHK's house rule, so a ...


9

まる is a name of this circle symbol, and ○○ is read out loud as まるまる, なになに, etc. It is used to make a placeholder or to mask a part of a sentence/word. English equivalent is **, __, "blank", "blah" or "bleep". In this case, I think the author used it just to make the title look more interesting. Related: How do you pronounce "☓☓" as a placeholder? ...


9

It is from the verb 「通{とお}す」. 「Verb in 連用形{れんようけい} (continuative form) + 通す」 means: "to continue [verb]-ing to the end" In 「しどおし」, the first 「し」 is the 連用形 of the verb 「する」. 「どおし」is the 連用形 of 「通す」. The と-to-ど change is rendaku. Thus, 「どおし」 has nothing to do with「同士」 -- none. 「通す」 is written 「とおす」 in kana, not 「とうす」. My TL of the line: "Even ...


8

Statistically speaking, the answer is definitely kanji, because the vast majority of Japanese nouns (including place names) are written in kanji. For example, on signboards, Tokyo is 東京 (kanji), Ginza is 銀座 (kanji), subway is 地下鉄 (kanji). However, there are over 1000 common kanji each with more than one reading, while there are only 40-some hiragana/katakana....


7

The road signs in most places in Japan have been standardised, such that any directional signs will typically have both Japanese (typically kanji with kana where appropriate) and English for place names. Most other signs will either have just a symbol or include a small amount of Japanese (e.g. 止まれ), possibly with English as well. As for shop signs, they ...


6

Whichever is fine, but katakana tends to be preferred in formal settings. For example, when you take a message over the phone from someone who only called himself Saiki, then you can say サイキ様からお電話がありました. Saiki can be 佐伯, 斉木, 西城 and so on in kanji. Writing さいき様 is not wrong, but it may look childish. Traditionally, katakana has been used as the default ...


6

The "proper" way to write this word is ラーメン because it's a relatively recent Chinese loanword. You can easily confirm this fact using any dictionary. But ラーメン has evolved in a unique way in Japan in the last 100 years or so to the point where it may be called a Japanese dish. And some old and "Japanized" loanwords are written in hiragana as if they were ...


5

Try improving your ほ, や, ら and り characters.


5

「いぢめる?」 「いじめないよォ」 Note, the word is いじめる and is normally never spelled いぢめる. It seems spelling it that way is a quirk of this character. (Normally じ and ぢ would be pronounced the same (ji), but in this case it’s possible the artist was going for something more ‘squirrel-like’ in pronunciation, like an emphasized/partially-voiced ち.)


4

This is why you shouldn't rely on romanization while learning Japanese phonology. Looking through the lens of romaji, っ and ん may certainly seem to do more or less the same thing: きっさ kissa, はっぱ happa, あんな anna, and ぐんま gumma (the last one may vary according to the practice). This is because romaji aims to make Japanese pronunciation friendly to those who ...


4

○ or × are often used as replacement characters for something that should be somewhat obvious to the reader but is not actually spelled out for some reason. One common example is using real life names of people or brands in fiction, e.g. マクドナルド→ マクド○ルド. The reasons could include trying to avoid notice of the person/company in question for possibly infringing ...


4

I think さっきまで means' just a while ago/Until just now/just until now. ' さっきまで家で寝ていました。 I was sleeping at home just until now. さっきまでは泣いてたけど、今は元気です。 Until just now, I had been crying but now I'm fine. さっきまでと同じ部屋 [It was/is the] same room just a while ago.


4

This depends on the pronoun. Some casual first-person pronouns are almost always written in hiragana because there are no ways to write them in kanji in the first place: うち, わい, あたし Some stilted first-person pronouns are always written in kanji: 小生, 朕 Many common first-person pronouns can be written both in kanji and in hiragana. Basically it's a matter of ...


4

Just as you have used various English suffixes to turn nouns into adjectives ("-ly", "-ish", "-ful", ...), there are a number of ways to do this in Japanese, too. Most important ones are: -な: 損 (disadvantage) / 損な (disadvantageous) 不思議 (mystery, wonder) / 不思議な (mysterious) -の 真 (truth) / 真の (true) 永遠 (eternity) / 永遠の (eternal) -っぽい 子供 (child) / 子供っぽい (...


3

Only real issue is that your ク looks a bit like カ, everything else is legible.


3

The question would be difficult to reach an answer because there is no other similar case, to my knowledge, commonly using two distinct set of letters that have equivalent phonetic values outside those bicameral writing systems and Japanese. In both cases, relationship between sets are conventionally and discretely defined, not such that a general ground has ...


3

(1) First of all, Japanese uses 5 separate scripts, not 3. They are: Hiragana Katakana Kanji Romaji Arabic Numerals All of these scripts are used frequently in Japanese, so it is not correct to say it only uses 3 scripts. (2) Secondly, you ask why romaji are not considered to be two separate scripts since they have upper case and ...


3

I would say there is very little conscious thought of whether something is a kun reading or an on reading of a character when speaking normally. That said, if you were to ask someone if a given reading is on or kun, they’d likely be able to answer quickly (if educated). It’s more secondary/subconscious knowledge, but can sometimes come in explicit use if you’...


3

In general, if you want to be sure of the correct kana spelling for a Japanese name, your best bet is to find out what kanji it's typically spelled with, and then find the matching readings for those kanji. In this case, looking up "Shinya" (as a surname), it appears to be most commonly spelled either 新谷 or 新屋. For both of those, the kana spelling would be ...


3

To actually answer the question, the characters are な (na) and ぢ (pronounced ji, but di in certain romanisations). To address the meaning of what's being said, I understand that there is a slight difference in the meaning of いじめる and いぢめる, both meaning to bully/tease. いぢめる has some sense of cuteness/playfulness about it: perhaps you're teasing someone, ...


3

There are many instances where this happens in Japanese. For whatever reason, sometimes the Kanji is not used with a word. Here's a few examples: ありがとう (normal) 有り難う (kanji form) よろしくおねがいします (normal) 宜しくお願いします (kanji form) こんにちは (normal) 今日は (kanji form) Off the top of my head there are four reasons why this happens (possibly more). Kanji is ...


2

Regarding the nametag, it does clearly say れいな -- it's probably just the joins between the elements that are making it 'look off' to you? Perhaps seen from afar it would be clearer, as those small joins would appear less prominent? As for pronunciation, Forvo is a good place to check for native pronunciation recordings. This individual says "Reina Miura" (...


2

Without context, "shinya" would be represented as しにゃ. However, AFAIK there is no name with such spelling so with 99% probability it is しんや. To avoid ambiguity, it is recommended to put an apostrophe between n representing ん and following vowels (i.e. "Shin'ya").


2

Yes, but "ya" and "ri" are badly written.


2

Adding on to scarlet witch's answer. The まで is the regular adverbial particle, which I think you may have recognized. I'm guessing here, but it seems that your confusion stems from misparsing さっき. さっき is a kind of emphasized form of さき, i.e. 先. The "regular" form さき expresses a broad array of meanings, one of which is "earlier". The geminate form さっき ...


1

This is essentially a duplicate of Is this character a そ? I don't like answering in comments, so I'll post it here. The character is a two-stroke そ with a dakuten: ぞ. Related: In what situations can you use ぞ as a sentence ender


1

"Sono pen wa desu" breaks down for 2 reasons, one grammatical, one logical: 'desu' needs a predicate (see mamster's example): for mere existence you need 'arimasu'. As soon as you write "sono pen" you take it for granted that it's a pen, just as in English you cannot start a question with 'this pen' to ask whether it's a pen.


1

First of all, I am also no expert, but I have been looking at classical Japanese orthography recently and noticed that many of the "spelling-change rules" seem to follow the same logic as some modern Japanese's collocations/"slang". For example the simplifying of words by seemingly merging sounds: わからない → わかんない。If you take けふ and pronounce ふ as hu not fu, ...


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