39

It says 聞いてるし. is 略字 (the handwritten simplified/abbreviated kanji) of 聞. Other kanji with 門, such as 問、間、開、閉 etc., can also be simplified the same way: Other examples of 略字: For more about 略字, see: Ryakuji on Wikipedia


30

It's no big deal, just that the most common standard handwritten form of the character is different from the most common printed form of the character. This doesn't even rise to the level of "variant character" in the strictest sense (like 悪 vs 惡). The two are the same character, just like a joined-up printed さ is the same as a disjoint handwritten one, or a ...


22

These "jumps" that you brought up are not part of the kanji, they are part of the typeface. (More specifically, they may be treated like serifs - or little decorations at the edge of certain lines) (see drooze's and Sweeper's answers) When you are learning kanji, you should definitely not be copying or referencing printed characters. You should learn from ...


21

This is the handwritten simplified version of , similar to simplified Chinese . Note however that the simplified Chinese form of the radical has a break, and the "divider" is a single dot-like stroke in the left corner: Meanwhile, the 門 radical is often abbreviated in Japanese handwriting to a 略字{りゃくじ} (ryakuji, "abbreviated character") form. The ...


21

Notice how in some fonts, the letter "A" has little things that stick out, too: But you wouldn't write those little tails in handwriting, would you? Same thing with 唱. I don't think I've met anyone who writes them with the "jumps". This is how I'd write 唱:


18

It's a famous book called ぎやどぺかどる, a translation of Guía de Pecadores (or "The Sinner's Guide") by Jesuit mission in Japan. It reads: きやとへかとる 巻の二 (voicing marks unused) Guia do Pecador - Book 2 (title in Medieval Portuguese) What makes it hard to read is hentaigana, now obsolete historic alternate kana, used in the line as: きや𛁻𛂶𛀙と𛃽 or ...


15

Stroke order is important for hand-written Japanese, which includes normal handwriting and various styles of calligraphy. The stroke order gives a flow to the character that can be recognized, even when the character looks very different to its [楷書]{かいしょ} incarnation. For the non-expert, a character written in 楷書 (in the correct order) probably cannot be ...


15

Not to take away from the general idea of the other answers, but those protrusions on the bottom end of「唱」are not serifs. Noto sans CJK, a sans-serif font - sans-serif means without serifs. These protrusions have been present since one-pixel wide bitmap fonts - I presume their purpose is to enhance legibility. The font displayed in the ...


14

That is the [草書体]{そうしょたい} (= "cursive script") for 「喜」, meaning "hapiness", "delight", etc. http://image.search.yahoo.co.jp/search?rkf=2&ei=UTF-8&p=%E5%96%9C+%E8%8D%89%E6%9B%B8%E4%BD%93 This is why one's 77th birthday is called 「[喜寿]{きじゅ}」. More technically speaking, though, it is the "re-block-ized" and stylized form of the original cursive ...


14

In printed form, they are the same except for their size. Mouth is smaller than enclosure. Enclosure encloses other radicals or kanji, but mouth never takes anything inside it. Some common kanji enclosed by enclosure: 国 四 回 団 図 園 因 Notice how 「回」 has both 囗 (enclosure) and 口 (mouth). In 楷書 (regular script), they look almost the same. They are drawn ...


14

The two radicals 口 and 囗 are indeed different, even though they are hard to distinguish in modern scripts/fonts. This "standardization" of unifying the looks of unrelated elements is somewhat intentional (presumably to make the script more homogeneous). You can see the same thing happening with 月 and 肉 (see Is there any reason a lot of body parts use the ...


13

行書 & 草書 (semi-cursive and cursive writings) 行書【ぎょうしょ】 (semi-cursive script) is similar to English 'handwriting' style, and this is the most orthodox way of writing Japanese sentences fast. This is what Japanese students learn at middle school, although that does not necessarily mean all students master beautiful 行書. You can compare 楷書【かいしょ】 (regular ...


13

It looks to me like [舞]{まい} (dance)...


12

When you want to ask a Japanese person about a kanji/word... they may ask you to write it out. If you trace out the character with a finger on your palm IN THE CORRECT ORDER, they will probably be able to recognize the strokes and answer your question quickly. This shows up way more often than you'd expect. Frankly, it's easier to remember complex kanji if ...


12

The rule you mentioned does not apply to 原稿用紙 for novels and articles. Never. However, you may be instructed to place 濁点(゛) and 半濁点(゜)into a separate box, when you have to fill some legacy paper forms at banks or government offices. This is because 濁点 and 半濁点 consume an extra byte if you encode hankaku katakana strings into old encodings such as JIS, Shift-...


11

Generally in Japanese handwriting the more feminine something is the more rounded out and cute it will be. If I think of girly English writing I think of neat bubbly letters while guys tend to be sloppy and angular. This carries over to Japanese. Additional reading: http://guideline.livedoor.biz/archives/51130942.html http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/...


11

郵便はがき postcard. 大日本 Dai Nippon "big Japan" or "Japanese empire". 樺太 Kara Futo, Sakhalin. 大泊町 Oh Tomari Cho, literally means "big harbor town". 東 east. 三条 3rd street. 南 south. 一ノ十一 one hyphen eleven. 髙橋 Taka Hashi, family name. 久男 Hisa O, a male name. 様 polite addressing like "Sir". 北満 Hoku Man, northern Manchuria. 龍江省 a Chinese geometric name, literally ...


11

「はね」is what I always hear it referred to as. A web search finds lots of sources to back this up: http://www.bunkei.co.jp/bunkei-app/soragaki/common/images/function.jpg http://www.y-adagio.com/public/standards/tr_fnttrm/fig7_7.gif http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%AD%86%E7%94%BB etc


11

[Edited to incorporate information from comments] 654号室 ビラルデイ ホセルイス様 郵便物をセンタオフィス にあずけています お受取り下さい 尼北局 (堀田) So they're telling you to pick up your mail (or parcel?) at the センタオフィス (Center Office?) Room #654 Mr. Berardi(?) José Luis We have left/entrusted the mail/parcel for you at the Center Office. Please pick it up. ...


10

It's nothing to worry about, I would go as far to say that it's not even a different "radical". (How can it be? It's the same Kanji.) Just like in English, things get, shall we say, "corrupted" in hand writing. Nothing is ever as neat and pretty as the pixels on a finely crafted character. Fortunately, this is an easier one to remember. Ignore my awful ...


10

I'm not Japanese, but based on what I know it is up to you to choose which style you would like to write in. However, as I commented previously, I recommend that you stick with the "handwritten" style rather than the "printed" one if you are using a pen or pencil. However, if you are using a brush then perhaps the other is more appropriate. There is a great ...


10

Assuming there is not anything preceding these letters that would alter its meaning, that would appear to say: 好きだ I (Like / Love) (You / It) "き" is often handwritten without the bowed bottom.


10

That's not ネ, that's オー. See, there's a single vertical line all the way through it, and the ー looks like a ー. Fluent readers use context in reading, and can often read words even if a let_er is missing. The more words you learn, the more your brain will be able to match patterns accurately, regardless of how they're written. In this case, if you know ...


10

You're probably working as programmer or accountant, or you won't actually see many people in Japan write in this style, because those slashes are added to reduce misreading possibility in quick handwriting. For what it's worth, I rarely write letters like this myself. Here is a more complete example from the font. Who made it is clearly a programmer (see ...


10

The character immediately below 「浅クサ区」 is not a kana. It is the 崩{くず}し字{じ} ("cursive style") for the kanji 「北」. Thus, the name of the section is 「北ミスジ丁」(北三筋丁in kanji). https://kakijun.jp/page/0524200.html


10

I'm assuming that this is a question on the different shapes of the「⻍・⻌」component of「道」. For reference, the glyph origin of「⻍・⻌」is shown below via the character「過」.「⻍・⻌」is a merger between「彳」and「止」;「止」eventually became drastically simplified, but「彳」still retains most of its structure in the print form, while slightly simplified in the handwritten form. ...


10

Since nobody has mentioned how you should actually write 唱, let me add a picture from a "textbook font" (教科書体) (see Is there an "official" font or other writing standard that should be used when teaching kanji?) You can follow the shape, but when writing with a pen, the "serifs" or "jumps" are sometimes less visible and usually the middle "bar" in ...


9

I noticed that most of the pairs in your list are between kana (mostly katakana) and kanji, with the only exception of へ. In my opinion, in most situations you can infer whether it's the kana or kanji symbol from the surrounding text. I think katakana symbols rarely sits alone on its own because we would find them in a bunch of at least 2 characters in a ...


9

It looks like 印象 to me.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


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