43

It says 聞いてるし. is 略字 (the handwritten simplified/abbreviated kanji) of 聞. Other kanji with 門, such as 問、間、開、閉 etc., can also be simplified the same way: Other examples of 略字: For more about 略字, see: Ryakuji on Wikipedia


24

This is the handwritten simplified version of , similar to simplified Chinese . Note however that the simplified Chinese form of the radical has a break, and the "divider" is a single dot-like stroke in the left corner: Meanwhile, the 門 radical is often abbreviated in Japanese handwriting to a 略字{りゃくじ} (ryakuji, "abbreviated character") form. The ...


22

Notice how in some fonts, the letter "A" has little things that stick out, too: But you wouldn't write those little tails in handwriting, would you? Same thing with 唱. I don't think I've met anyone who writes them with the "jumps". This is how I'd write 唱:


22

These "jumps" that you brought up are not part of the kanji, they are part of the typeface. (More specifically, they may be treated like serifs - or little decorations at the edge of certain lines) (see drooze's and Sweeper's answers) When you are learning kanji, you should definitely not be copying or referencing printed characters. You should learn from ...


18

It's a famous book called ぎやどぺかどる, a translation of Guía de Pecadores (or "The Sinner's Guide") by Jesuit mission in Japan. It reads: きやとへかとる 巻の二 (voicing marks unused) Guia do Pecador - Book 2 (title in Medieval Portuguese) What makes it hard to read is hentaigana, now obsolete historic alternate kana, used in the line as: きや𛁻𛂶𛀙と𛃽 or ...


16

Not to take away from the general idea of the other answers, but those protrusions on the bottom end of「唱」are not serifs. Noto sans CJK, a sans-serif font - sans-serif means without serifs. These protrusions have been present since one-pixel wide bitmap fonts - I presume their purpose is to enhance legibility. The font displayed in the question is classed ...


15

行書 & 草書 (semi-cursive and cursive writings) 行書【ぎょうしょ】 (semi-cursive script) is similar to English 'handwriting' style, and this is the most orthodox way of writing Japanese sentences fast. This is what Japanese students learn at middle school, although that does not necessarily mean all students master beautiful 行書. You can compare 楷書【かいしょ】 (regular ...


15

The two radicals 口 and 囗 are indeed different, even though they are hard to distinguish in modern scripts/fonts. This "standardization" of unifying the looks of unrelated elements is somewhat intentional (presumably to make the script more homogeneous). You can see the same thing happening with 月 and 肉 (see Is there any reason a lot of body parts use the ...


14

That is the [草書体]{そうしょたい} (= "cursive script") for the kanji 「喜」, meaning "happiness", "delight", etc. http://image.search.yahoo.co.jp/search?rkf=2&ei=UTF-8&p=%E5%96%9C+%E8%8D%89%E6%9B%B8%E4%BD%93 This is the reason that one's 77th birthday is called 「[喜寿]{きじゅ}」. More technically speaking, though, it is the "re-block-ized" and stylized form of the ...


14

I'm assuming that this is a question on the different shapes of the「⻍・⻌」component of「道」. For reference, the glyph origin of「⻍・⻌」is shown below via the character「過」.「⻍・⻌」is a merger between「彳」and「止」;「止」eventually became drastically simplified, but「彳」still retains most of its structure in the print form, while slightly simplified in the handwritten form. ...


14

That’s likely not a kanji, but rather a hiragana そ (so) in its split/handwritten form (like on the right here):


13

In printed form, they are the same except for their size. Mouth is smaller than enclosure. Enclosure encloses other radicals or kanji, but mouth never takes anything inside it. Some common kanji enclosed by enclosure: 国 四 回 団 図 園 因 Notice how 「回」 has both 囗 (enclosure) and 口 (mouth). In 楷書 (regular script), they look almost the same. They are drawn ...


12

It looks to me like [舞]{まい} (dance)...


11

The rule you mentioned does not apply to 原稿用紙 for novels and articles. Never. However, you may be instructed to place 濁点(゛) and 半濁点(゜)into a separate box, when you have to fill some legacy paper forms at banks or government offices. This is because 濁点 and 半濁点 consume an extra byte if you encode hankaku katakana strings into old encodings such as JIS, Shift-...


11

You're probably working as programmer or accountant, or you won't actually see many people in Japan write in this style, because those slashes are added to reduce misreading possibility in quick handwriting. For what it's worth, I rarely write letters like this myself. Here is a more complete example from the font. Who made it is clearly a programmer (see ...


11

Thanks to naruto, I was able to verify that 社 does get contracted into the shape in the image using this 電子くずし字字典 website. 電気会社員 I found the first two characters of the second line on this page from powresearch.jp. 爪哇{ジャワ}俘虜{ふりょ}収容所第一分所へ移管ス 爪哇 are the kanji for Java! 聯合{れんごう}国軍二引渡シ完了ス 聯 (れん; simplified handwriting style) because 聯合国軍 is the word for ...


11

A recent guideline from 文化庁 clearly says this distinction is not important in most cases. See page 53 of this PDF (常用漢字表の字体・字形に関する指針(報告)(案)) (2016): As for 木, you can also use はね (). Some recent elementary school teachers are extremely strict on this kind of thing, which has caused much controversy. Outside school, very few adults care about this. If ...


11

This is 馬 in some handwritten font. It's moderately deformed, but it still retains the features of traditional semi-cursive (行書) style. For example, the wavy line at the bottom represents four dots (灬), which is common in 行書. Any native speaker can read this easily, and a few may actually handwrite kanji like this, but beginners should not mimic the style of ...


10

Assuming there is not anything preceding these letters that would alter its meaning, that would appear to say: 好きだ I (Like / Love) (You / It) "き" is often handwritten without the bowed bottom.


10

「はね」is what I always hear it referred to as. A web search finds lots of sources to back this up: http://www.bunkei.co.jp/bunkei-app/soragaki/common/images/function.jpg http://www.y-adagio.com/public/standards/tr_fnttrm/fig7_7.gif http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%AD%86%E7%94%BB etc


10

Is my hiragana handwriting understandable? the casual handwriting written at the same speed as when I am writing Latin alphabet. They are very well understandable on condition written at the considerable speed. To write them better, please refer to the examples shown in broccoli forest's comment. The only one important point to refer to is whether the left ...


10

[Edited to incorporate information from comments] 654号室 ビラルデイ ホセルイス様 郵便物をセンタオフィス にあずけています お受取り下さい 尼北局 (堀田) So they're telling you to pick up your mail (or parcel?) at the センタオフィス (Center Office?) Room #654 Mr. Berardi(?) José Luis We have left/entrusted the mail/parcel for you at the Center Office. Please pick it up. ...


10

Since nobody has mentioned how you should actually write 唱, let me add a picture from a "textbook font" (教科書体) (see Is there an "official" font or other writing standard that should be used when teaching kanji?) You can follow the shape, but when writing with a pen, the "serifs" or "jumps" are sometimes less visible and usually the middle "bar" in ...


9

This looks like it isn't really related to foxes, but is オタ魂 written as one character. (I would read it オタ[魂]{こん}.) オタ is the abbreviation of オタク otaku 魂 meaning "soul" or "spirit" So, loosely something like ... "gamer's soul"? Edit. As @choco points out in the comments, オタコン refers to Otacon of the Metal Gear series.


9

Generally your writing is very good and readable. You can improve them by the following advice.


9

Indeed, it reads 「アニメ関係{かんけい}の皆様{みなさま}」 ("To all parties involved in animation"). In handwriting, the "simplified" form of the radical 「門」 (called 門構{もんがま}え) shown below is quite often used particularly, but not exclusively, by adults.


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