11

People learning Japanese get all caught up in polite language by twisting odd sounding honourific English to make it seem like it's at the same level of politeness as Japanese, like "I humble receive you allowing me to do that". From now on, think of いただきます as simply meaning "get" or "have" as in "getting someone to do something nice for you", because that's ...


9

Personally, the difference is “Who made your friend teach how to play the game?” You? or your friend on his own initiative? *ゲームするのを教えて sounds a bit funny, so I’ll modify it using やり方. 僕は友達にゲームのやり方を教えてもらった。 When I read this sentence, I had a picture in my mind that you had asked your friend to teach you how to play the game, and then he decided to do so....


7

What are natural ways to say "If I can help you with noun phrase‍"? If I understand English correctly, this phrase should mean "if there is a chance I am of help to you with...", but unfortunately, your Japanese sentences mean "if I have enough ability to help you with..." In other words, it presupposes somebody does need help, rather than may or may ...


6

I think that if you take this sentence and add a general subject to it, the meaning becomes clearer, i.e.: 私は車掌さんが彼等に注意をしてくれるのを待ちました。 As you can see, it is easier to understand now who will benefit from what action: "As for me, I waited for the conductor to give them a warning[an action which I would benefit from]" Keep in mind that くれる is used when the ...


6

This is the 〜てもらう form. It means to have/get someone to do something (often as a favour for you). The focus is on the speaker's action more than the person doing the favour; Contrast this with 〜てくれる (参考: Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?). 面白いのでたくさんの人に読んでもらいたい → This is very interesting, so I'd like (to get) a lot of people to read it. ...


6

先に行ってくれますか? -- Will you go first? You can rephrase it as: 先に行ってもらえますか? -- lit. Can I have you go first? (もらえる is the potential form of もらう)


6

お客様に満足してもらう is not strange at all, and this is a very simple example of ~てもらう. Please check the grammar pattern of ~てもらう. Also note the transitivity; 満足する is "to be satisfied" and 満足させる is "to satisfy." お客様に満足してもらう literally means "to have customers be satisfied", or more naturally, "to satisfy customers (by doing something)." お客様に満足してあげる is grammatical ...


6

There is no direct equivalent of もらう in English, and "have someone do ~" is just one of the "hacks" to translate this もらう into English. In this case, they are expecting Sensei will use the gift voluntarily, so "we can have him use" may sound off (correct me if I'm wrong). Nevertheless, this もらう is there because they (M & F) think they will feel happy ...


5

Hope I've understood you correctly: くださる means 'to give'. (You) give (me) the favour of making sure to come at 8 o'clock. = Please make sure to come at 8 o'clock The person doing the giving (you) is the opponent which is the subject of くださる. The speaker (me) is the indirect object.


5

This くれる means "someone give something to someone", so the action is the other side. そのお菓子を息子にくれますか? is translated as "Can you give the snack to my son?" This もらう means "someone receive something from someone", so the action is speakers' side. そのお菓子を息子にもらえますか? is translated as "Can I receive the snack from my son?" but it is unnatural to say that to someone....


5

To answer your first question: Giving and receiving verbs can be quite tricky. Let's work through it 少しずつ. If the verb is もらう, then the subject is receiving something (or a verb in this case) from the giver as in [subject(receiver)] は [giver] に [verb] ~てもらう If we use くれる the roles swap and the idea of the sentence changes too. Instead we would say that the ...


5

There's a reason. あげる、くれる、and もらう are used not only to mean "give" and "receive," but also as auxiliary verbs meaning "to do something for someone's benefit" (あげる)and "to have something done for your benefit" (くれる and もらう). When used in this sense, these verbs always attach to the て form of a verb. Here's more information on てくれる specifically. So the ...


5

「〜てもらう」 has a basic meaning of "get / make / induce (someone) to do (something)" In the case of わかる, the form 分かってもらう could mean either "make it understood / make you understand (something)" or "make you accept (something)". When you further conjugate this with the volitional おう ending, which indicates a potential future act, 分かってもらおう ends up meaning ...


5

~てやる means 'do something (for someone of equal or lower social standing than you)'; it doesn't emphasize the command. ~てくれ is a command asking them to do something for you. With both used together like this, the sentence roughly means, 'Fujioka, do me a favour and tell them all about it.' It does sound pretty masculine because ~てやる can sound that way and ~くれ ...


5

この「片づける」は "to settle down", "to sort out" のような意味で使われています。現代文でも「問題を片づける」「トラブルを片づける」などと言うことができます。ただし、現代文で「態度を片づける」ということはまれだと思います。私なら「態度を決める」「態度について片をつける」などと言うと思います。 この文の場合は、「~てもらいたい」と「~てほしい」はほとんど同じです。ただし、「~てもらいたい」の方が、話者自身に直接利益があるという印象が強くなります。例えば「ヤンキースに優勝してもらいたい」と言うと、まるでヤンキースの関係者が言っているように聞こえるかもしれません。単なるファンとして応援している場合は「ヤンキースに優勝して欲しい」というのが普通でしょう。


5

It's the other way around. "王に敬称で呼んでいただくなど……恐れ多いことです。" means it is too much for the king to call him with honorifics. The form Aに<てVerb>いただく simply means A is doing the action for the speaker.


5

The て-form of a verb followed by くれる (polite form くれます) indicates that the verb is being done as a favour to the recipient of the verbs action. くれる literally means 'to give', so いっしょにきてくれますか would translate as "Will you give (me the favour of) coming with me, i.e. "Will you come with me". There are other verbs that do similar/related things: あげる, もらう etc....


5

There is no grammar for giving negative favor. What you mentioned やがって (やがる) tells negative honorific, which is another category. It is possible to use favor verbs ironically, but even if so, it only makes sense by pretending a good will, thus 食べてあげてごめん won't work anyway. You can only say 食べちゃってごめん (食べてしまってごめん) which lets ~てしまう connote unexpected (and ...


4

The form The sentence, そうさせていただきます, is a typical example of use of 謙譲語{けんじょうご} (humble language). Translation Let's make the Speaker2's sentence a normal form. (Earlier step is politer.) Step 1. では、そうさせていただきます。 Step 2. では、そうさせてもらいます。 Step 3. では、そうします。 Step 4. なら、そうする。 So, these sentences can be translated like: Speaker1: You can go for a meal earlier than ...


4

私は智子さんのために買い物に行きました。 私は智子さんのために買い物に行ってあげました。 私は買い物に行ってあげました。 けんさんが私のために部屋を掃除してくれました。 けんさんが部屋を掃除してくれました。 けんさんが私のために部屋を掃除しました。 They are all correct. To be honest, they are not that different. With くれました or あげました, the fact that someone is a beneficiary could have slight emphasis.


4

もらう is to get something. it can be a thing or an action. if it is an action, the verb describing the action is in て-form, so in this case 私の両親に会って = to meet my parents. the person you get something from is marked with に so in this case あなた = you. もらう is in たい-from, which means I want to. んですが is typical ending for a wish, where you want it to sound more ...


4

If you want to say "When will you pay me back the money?", you can say いつお金を返してくれますか. いつお金を返してあげますか would mean "When will you pay back the money (to someone other than me)".


4

Recall that 呉れる is the plain version of the polite 下さる. くれ and ください both mean 'to do for or give to the in-group' (often just the speaker). In this case, do me the favor of giving him my regards. よろしくお伝えください and よろしく言ってくれ both mean to give someone your regards (in your place), i.e. "Tell them I said 'hi'". はちすずめへ、To the hummingbird あとで later よろしく云って = ...


4

「チケットが2枚余ってて~」とか言ってくる男がいたから、「いらないなら2枚ともちょうだい」って言っただけ There was a guy who said to me something like "I have two extra tickets", so I just said "If you don't need them, give me both." (brackets added by me) ちょうだい is used regardless of sex, and there is no personal pronoun, so you have to determine the subject of 言った at the end only form the context. ...


4

Does もらう operate on both 作る and お願いする? もらう operates on 作る. You can split the sentence this way: 1) 会社が毎年、農家の人にお願いしています。 Every year the company makes requests to farmers. 2) 会社が毎年、農家の人にこのりんごを作ってもらっています。 Every year the company receives (the benefit of) the farmers making these apples. シールを作った会社が毎年、農家の人にお願いしてこのりんごを作ってもらっています。 Every year the company ...


4

It seems you, or your teacher, confuses くれる with ~てくれる. The former, the "inbound" form of "give", is restrictive on the identity of receiver, that only allows roughly "those who are a part of life of you". The latter, a subsidiary verb that attaches to any other main verb, can be used regardless of the subject or the object, whenever the act benefits you in ...


4

休んでくれませんか is more like won't you rest? 休ませてもらえますか is like could you let me rest? 休んでもらえますか is like could I have you take the day off? くれる is used when something is done in your/your party's favor. More specifically, it is attached to the verb that someone else does for you. For example, マイケルは(私に)ペンを貸してくれた。 もらう is used to describe your party receiving an ...


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