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9 votes
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Do native speakers learn consonant and vowel length easily, or is it difficult?

I assume that you are asking whether native speakers can detect, as a child, whether a vowel is long (マーナ) or short (マナ). The answer is yes, infants can detect it by age 9.5 months according to the ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 106
8 votes
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Why was つ originally used to mark consonant gemination? When was that?

Short summary: Heian-period Japanese acquired new sounds, including a syllable-final -t, a geminated tt, and other geminated consonants. The つ kana, originally tu, was a natural match to write the new ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
7 votes
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In compound words what is it called when two Ks assimilate into a っ?

Wouldn't っ normally require the first onyomi to have a tsu ending? No. This small っ is unrelated to big つ in most cases. This letter is used as gemination (促音【そくおん】) marker that you should double the ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
7 votes
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Is 'うつさい' equivalent to 'うるさい' in this context? Why?

It's 'うっさい' in this context and it's a colloquial style of 'うるさい'.
XiangPingJun's user avatar
5 votes
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Removing the く when pronouncing 洗濯機(せんたくき)

She pronounced it as せんたっき, not せんたき. According to NHK, this is an acceptable pronunciation of the word. The く was not removed, but replaced with the small tsu! This is a phenomenon called 促音化 (...
naruto's user avatar
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5 votes
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Bridging tsu ("つ") when joining two kanji

There's a page here on the 9 different changes that can occur in Japanese when words or syllables are joined. https://jn1et.com/hennonngennshou/ The insertion of a つ is 促音化 sokuonka (gemination in ...
brownsardine's user avatar
4 votes
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Why does gemination happen in many 真 compounds?

(Seems like we're not getting anything more specific, so I'll format my comments as an answer for ease of future reference.) The electronic edition of the Kokugo Dajiten has it like this: 接頭語「ま」...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
4 votes

Difficult to understand katakana of the word "though"

I'm not a native English speaker, but as Eiríkr Útlendi pointed out in the comment section, I feel there is a /ʊ/ sound even in American English (as long as the word is pronounced slowly and clearly). ...
naruto's user avatar
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3 votes
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gemination orthography

I agree with @Simon in the comments: since the gemination comes from the く in ひゃく, ひゃっ should be the natural choice when writing ひゃっキロ in kana and I would not be too surprised to see [100]{ひゃっ} [km]{...
Earthliŋ's user avatar
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3 votes

っ(sokuon) usage

This is why you shouldn't rely on romanization while learning Japanese phonology. Looking through the lens of romaji, っ and ん may certainly seem to do more or less the same thing: きっさ kissa, はっぱ happa,...
broccoli forest's user avatar
3 votes
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Long vowel followed by っ

Yes, it happens word-internally in Japanese, but it's quite rare. As you probably know, Old Japanese had neither geminate consonants nor long vowels (as far as the best contemporary reconstructions ...
Matt's user avatar
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2 votes
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Regarding ようか and the role of か in it

First, it is common in informal spoken Japanese for syllables to be dropped, shortened, lengthened or changed in some way. In your example, you are correct in saying that 降りよっか is an informal, ...
kandyman's user avatar
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2 votes

In compound words what is it called when two Ks assimilate into a っ?

The name of this phenomenon is called "gemination," and it is a specific case of a larger phenomenon that happens in many languages called "sandhi" (after some research, there appears to be a Japanese ...
Kurausukun's user avatar
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2 votes

Do native speakers learn consonant and vowel length easily, or is it difficult?

I wouldn't worry too much about it, the more you listen to Japanese the more it will naturally come to you. In any case, Long vowels are not something you'll be struggling with in the long run, ...
Seishin Kan's user avatar
2 votes

Bridging tsu ("つ") when joining two kanji

You're describing what's known as sandhi, specifically rendaku and gemination. It happens a bunch in Japanese, but the rules are notoriously complex. For example it's unclear to me why 学祭{がくさい} couldn'...
Ringil's user avatar
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2 votes

Bridging tsu ("つ") when joining two kanji

I believe the name for this process is rendaku. More here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rendaku
knowledge_is_power's user avatar
2 votes
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What is the middle character in Todd (Katakana)

The "small tsu" ッ is not pronounced tsu, but rather represents gemination. The rule of thumb is that a final D gets transliterated as ッド (and a final T as ット) bed → ベッド pad → パッド good → グッド god → ...
Earthliŋ's user avatar
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1 vote

What syllables can cause Sokuon?

contraction of certain syllables into gemination (the sound change is called [促音化]{そくおんか}) is something that happens all the time in Japanese, from the ~て form of verbs, to the prefix ぶっ~ from ぶち~ as ...
mati's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote

Is す devoiced in おすそわけ?

I am fairly certain that there is a rise in pitch on the そ, which suggests that the す is devoiced.
N. Hunt's user avatar
  • 875
1 vote

Why is gemination limited to voiceless obstruents?

For the older vocabulary of Japanese, we have native "Yamato" terms and borrowed Sino-Japanese terms. For these, gemination as spelled with the small-tsu っ historically only happened with voiceless ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar

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