12

I'm Japanese native speaker. In my opinion, little "っ" at the end of sentence is not pronounced at all. However, it often indicates "small" (not so serious) emotions of speaker, I'll show you some example, comparing with other two expressions for writing: 01. ふざけんなよっ 02. ふざけんなよ… 03. ふざけるなよ! (All sentences mean "Don't be silly") As you see, first sentence is ...


10

It is common in songs, and it is not specific to children’s songs. In the first case, the pitch of the lyric line is probably something like: し(G) ら(G) ん(G) ぷ(G) り(G) を(F#) し(G) た(E) っ(F#) て(D) but if you try to sing this as it is, there is a problem: gemination is not a sound but just a pause, and you cannot sing it with any pitch. Therefore, the ...


8

The standard form is おもしろくて仕方ない, where おもしろくて is used as an adjective (not adverb) in the て-form for connecting predicates. (て-form adjective) + 仕方ない or (たい-form verb in て-form) + 仕方ない is a common phrase that means “It's so (adjective)” or “I really want to (verb)”. The nuance of this 仕方ない is “I can't stand it”, but it's not to be taken literally, ...


7

The question is ambiguous. Are you looking for a word with two pronunciations, or a word with two pronunciations with slightly different nuances? – Tsuyoshi Ito 5 hours ago @TsuyoshiIto: The former. – Andrew Grimm 5 hours ago Since it appears from these comments that you are just looking for words with 2 (or more) pronunciations, then, yes, there are a ...


7

Short summary: Heian-period Japanese acquired new sounds, including a syllable-final -t, a geminated tt, and other geminated consonants. The つ kana, originally tu, was a natural match to write the new -t, which led to its use in tt, and from that it slowly became the symbol for gemination in general. Long answer: Nara-period Old Japanese had no long ...


7

It's 'うっさい' in this context and it's a colloquial style of 'うるさい'.


6

It is exactly as you stated. Using 「Word + っぽい」 over 「Word + ぽい」 is actually a "recent" phonetic trend in the history of the language. The trend is only about 100-plus years old. If you read novels from Meiji Era (1868 - 1912), you will notice the coexistence of both forms. 「~~くって」 is the colloquial form of 「~~くて」 and it is very common in our spoken ...


6

Wouldn't っ normally require the first onyomi to have a tsu ending? No. This small っ is unrelated to big つ in most cases. This letter is used as gemination (促音【そくおん】) marker that you should double the next consonant*1. One source of geminate consonants is kanji that had final consonant accommodated to Japanese pronunciation*2 e.g. 合 kap + 戦 sen → 合戦 kassen, ...


6

Despite how it looks, っ doesn't only double the consonant "t" but is an all-around geminator used with most of Japanese consonants. See the Wikipedia article. And for the last part 「っけ」, this page will be helpful. ProTip™: Although Wikipedia says you can't use っ with some consonants, the younger generation seems have acquired many untraditional geminations ...


5

You're probably be confusing つ and っ. In other words, it's not さつき you're seeing, but さっき. The small っ is not, however, silent: it creates a slight pause between さ and き, meaning words like さっき and さき, or 活気 (かっき) and 下記 (かき) are not homophones.


5

Not hugely confident in this answer, but I'll try. The gemination is supposed to be accomplished by a glottal stop in speech, and singing with a glottal stop is awkward at best and would sound strange even done properly. I imagine that the vowel lengthening is done to fill in a mora for rhythm/time purposes, and to indicate the omission. (That is, I know ...


5

Even if you read 6分 as ろくふん, it's ok. But ろっぷん is easier to pronounce and much more common. It's the same when it's used like 5.6分, which is usually ごーてんろっぷん.


4

AFAIK cch => tch is the only exception defined in the Hepburn romanization system and its variants (such as パスポート式). All the other 促音 (っ) are expressed by repeating the same consonant. Specifically, I'm not aware of any romanization standard which uses dj. So if you want to strictly obey the rule, バッジ would be rendered as bajji even in the Hepburn system ...


4

If we are talking about having pronunciation dictated by social setting/audience, then やはり and やっぱり count as such a pair in such a pattern.


3

My first impression is that the only purpose of the extra mora is to create an additional mora for rhythmic reasons. Vowel lengthening does occur for expressive reasons, but I don't think any connection can be drawn to gemination. From a phonological perspective, I see no reason a vowel would lengthen before a geminate. I don't recall ever seeing such a ...


3

Similar to what broccoli forest shared, "た-form + っけ" is a grammar structure that is used for confirmation. In English, it is similar to "~, right?". For example, you met a few people at a party but even after the introductions, there was a name that was hard to catch. In that case, you can use "お名前は何とおっしゃいましたっけ。" to prompt the person to tell you his/her ...


3

Yes, it happens word-internally in Japanese, but it's quite rare. As you probably know, Old Japanese had neither geminate consonants nor long vowels (as far as the best contemporary reconstructions can determine). Pretty much all the geminate consonants in today's Japanese can be traced to (i) more or less well-understood series of changes like the one that ...


2

The name of this phenomenon is called "gemination," and it is a specific case of a larger phenomenon that happens in many languages called "sandhi" (after some research, there appears to be a Japanese term for this as well, known as 連{れん}音{おん}). As for why it doesn't happen in 加湿器, I actually am not 100% sure myself, but I would guess it's because Japanese ...


2

First, it is common in informal spoken Japanese for syllables to be dropped, shortened, lengthened or changed in some way. In your example, you are correct in saying that 降りよっか is an informal, colloquial version of 降りようか. You might have noticed other 'slang' ways of saying things, such as 寒っ!instead of 寒い! So it's not unusual to see syllables changed in ...


2

(Seems like we're not getting anything more specific, so I'll format my comments as an answer for ease of future reference.) The electronic edition of the Kokugo Dajiten has it like this: 接頭語「ま」の下に促音の挿入された形, So the standard view isn't that it was makoto > maQ-; but rather a simple ma-, to which -Q- was later tacked on. And indeed, of the words you've ...


2

There's a page here on the 9 different changes that can occur in Japanese when words or syllables are joined. https://jn1et.com/hennonngennshou/ The insertion of a つ is 促音化 sokuonka (gemination in English). The general rules are relatively straightforward for most two on-yomi compounds. First character reading ends in tsu followed by k, s or t -> tsu ...


2

You're describing what's known as sandhi, specifically rendaku and gemination. It happens a bunch in Japanese, but the rules are notoriously complex. For example it's unclear to me why 学祭{がくさい} couldn't be がっさい. You can read about it some more here.


2

I believe the name for this process is rendaku. More here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rendaku


1

For the older vocabulary of Japanese, we have native "Yamato" terms and borrowed Sino-Japanese terms. For these, gemination as spelled with the small-tsu っ historically only happened with voiceless obstruents. The analogue for geminate voiced obstruents in Japanese was prenasalization, which we do see -- although it is realized as //ɴ// + [following ...


1

「っ」 or 「小さい『つ』」 is used to geminate (or lengthen) the following consonant, basically meaning it is pronounced about twice as long as normal. It's traditionally only used before plosives and fricatives, and the use of 「っ」 for this function evolved from the 「つ」 ending on many on'yomi (Chinese readings) of kanji, since it frequently gets "eaten up" by the ...


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