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14

Japanese has a clearer distinction between volitional-future and simple-future than English. "I think I will go" can be parsed in two ways, one involving volition, and one without. 私は行こうと思う (Volitional future) 私は行くと思う (Simple future) "Will" being interpreted without volition when used in the first-person can be a little counter-intuitive. So here's ...


5

平成 will last until the Emperor's death. So, until that happens, every future year is stated as 平成. If he were to pass away, then there would be a new name decided upon, and that year would be the final year of 平成 (up to day of his death) and the [元年]{がんねん} of the next era (starting from the day after his death). Once the change happens, obviously any ...


4

Am I wrong that it can be used this way? No. This grammatical form is standard in monologue situations, just like your example: "Hum, should I go?" (undecided). The other example translates rather like "I wonder if I'll go" (answer unknown).


4

You are most likely mishearing 〜てやる, as in 殺してやる. Related: What does てやる mean when it is not used for giving?


3

~ておく has several meanings, and in this case it means "to leave (status)" or "to do (something) for now / for the time being". 窓を開けておく can mean both "to leave the window open" and "to open the window beforehand." So saying ておく here implies he is going to win eventually in the future. Dropping おく and saying 引き分けってことにしてやる will not largely change the meaning in ...


2

タイへ行く時に、タイ語を少し習った。 When going to Thailand, I studied a little of Thai. Because 行く refers either to the present or future, it means that I studied Thai BEFORE going to Thailand. タイへ行った時に、タイ語を少し習った。 When I went to Thailand, I studied a little of Thai. This has the exact same meaning as in English. I went to Thailand, THEN I studied Thai.


2

抜けたら has nothing to do with past tense. According to "A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar", page 452: "たら is a subordinate conjunction which indicates that the action/state expressed by the main clause in a sentence takes place after the action/state expressed by the subordinate clause." Examples: 山田さんが来たら、私は帰る。 If Mr. Yamada comes, I will go home. In ...


2

The expression of 日本へ行く前に has all possiblities of past, present and future. future:日本へ行く前におみやげを買った。これから日本へ行きます。 present:日本へ行く前におみやげを買った。いま飛行機に乗っています。 past:日本へ行く前におみやげを買った。だからこれをあなた(日本の友達)にあげます。


2

I think you may be talking about words like しよう and 食べよう, which are in the volitional tense. This tense generally expresses the intention or will of someone, as in. 僕は日本に行こうと思ってる. I'm thinking of going to Japan. It really doesn't have a direct parallel to English, and is a bit different from what you would think of as "future tense". The concept of "~will"...


2

One simple possibility is to use 数年後{すうねんご} (a few years from now / several years from now / several years later). The prefix 数{すう}~ can be used to indicate an unspecified number of something which is more than two but still a relatively small number. For example, 数分{すうふん} (several minutes), 数人{すうにん} (several people), etc. The suffix ~後 refers to a point ...


2

It all depends on the situations in which you want to say those but here are some natural-sounding sentences. For Sentence 1: 「明日には仕事を終えるつもりです(or 終えるつもりでいます)。」 Plain active voice. If you absolutely must use 「絶対」, place it right in front of the 仕事 or 終える. You could also say: 「明日には(or までには)仕事を終わらせるつもりです。」 I used a causative 終わらせる here. For Sentence 2:...


1

I would think that もうちょっとで is better/more natural than もうちょっとしてから What about しばらくしてから会いに行く?But this is for longer term usage(maybe more than 1 week). I would think that 未来 and 将来 are used to express things that would happen much further in the future(at least 10 years-ish?).


1

No, きっと means "certainly" here. I don't understand what you find wrong with 'is' in your translation. Insert a 'you' before 'will' and it makes perfect sense.


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