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18

「コ」 is short for 「コーン」 ("corn") here. This type of shortening is very common in Japanese when the word would get too long without it..


12

As a fact-based answer, there is nothing much to say besides that コ here stands for コーン (corn). However, I'm pretty sure that the exact word form バタコチーズライス is chosen because it makes a reference to two major characters in the famous children manga/anime series アンパンマン, namely バタコ (a female baker) and チーズ (dog). (from the left: チーズ, バタコ, ジャムおじさん)


12

「かけ」 vs. 「つけ」 Those are two of the more common serving styles of udon. 「かけ」 comes in one (large) bowl with both the broth and noodles in it. With 「つけ」, the noodles and broth are served separately for you to do your "dipping and dunking". You get the noodles in a dish or shallow bamboo basket and the broth in a small bowl/cup. That bamboo basket is ...


9

気楽な corresponds to 気が楽 and describes feeling at ease or relaxed, a semi-literal translation of the latter might be "ease of mind". "Easy" itself has several meanings in English, and "easy to drink" would not necessarily be interpreted as meaning the opposite of "technically difficult to drink". In any case, translating 気楽なお酒 as an "easy drink" would be ...


6

丸ごと means "whole" and ごと is usually written in kana. By "butterfly" I guess you mean what would be called 鮎のひらき, which means the fish would be "cleaned" (gutted) but skin, bones, head, fins, etc. would not be removed. I guess the store employee was trying to explain to you that you would be served the whole fish, rather than a filet.


6

This dish would be "Butter Corn-Cheese Rice" in English, something similar to Corn and Rice Casserole!


4

いただきます said before a meal is basically just a custom, and it's usually addressed to no one in particular, although you may think you're thanking to "everything" by saying it. But if you have a particular existence (person, god, place, or whatever) you are specifically thanking to, it's perfectly fine to add the name of the "giver" after or before いただきます. ...


4

It is the tip of the orange part, not leaves of carrot.


2

私は辛い野菜が嫌い makes sense because this is the grammar pattern used to talk about things you like or do not like. 私は...が嫌い 私は...が好き I think it's important to note that both 嫌い and 好き are nouns. Really, they are nominalized verbs, 嫌う(to dislike) → 嫌い(something disliked) 好く(to like) → 好き(something liked) You might think of the Japanese grammar as saying ...


2

The "eight" in お八つ/八つ時 refers to the fact that in traditional Japanese timekeeping, the time between 1pm and 3pm (prime snack time) was signalled by eight strikes of a bell. According to the Wiki article about the traditional timekeeping system, the number of strikes corresponded to the length of a length of incense which was lit at noon and midnight. Every ...


1

I do not use うま味 for describing the taste of tasting dessert cakes. うま味 is basically used when you are eating claypot cooking called 土鍋{どなべ} in Japan such as 湯豆腐{ゆどうふ}. It is believed to using the same 土鍋{どなべ} for long years, you can get good うま味 from the pot itself without adding umami ingredients a lot. Thanks to long years cooking 鍋物{なべもの}, the taste ...


1

You see the word ゴトin the red circle(マル), and it means マルゴトas you understand it, as a whole.


1

As @Yuuichi Tam says, this is the orange thin part of the root. You could also have deduced this by elimination: the green part would undoubtedly be 人参の葉っぱ (also in recipes).


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