Hot answers tagged

28

Both さけ and しゃけ mean salmon and are written as 鮭 in kanji (but I will avoid using this kanji in this answer for an obvious reason). As far as I know, there is no difference in meaning, but some people seem to distinguish the two words in meanings (see below). According to a webpage by Maruha Nichiro Foods, Inc., the Kōjien dictionary lists the word しゃけ as ...


24

Although 並(nami), 大(dai) will work in most of the places, others would depend on each restaurant. For Small - 小 (shou), ミニ (mini), 半分 (hanbun), 少なめ (sukuname), S (エス)... For Normal - 並 (nami), 普通 (futsuu), 中(chuu), M (エム)... For Big - 大 (dai), 大盛り (oomori), 多め (oome), L (エル)... For Special Big - 1.5盛 (ittengo mori) (sukiya invented it) For Extra Big - 特盛 (...


20

Observe:  飯 meshi ご飯 gohan They both mean the same thing, which is (cooked) rice and/or meal. Since rice is an essential part of Japanese cuisine, the two meanings very much overlap. As you said, ご〜 go- is an honorific prefix, which makes ご飯 gohan the politer alternative used in more polite speech. 昼飯 hirumeshi 昼ご飯 hirugohan Both mean "lunch" ...


18

「コ」 is short for 「コーン」 ("corn") here. This type of shortening is very common in Japanese when the word would get too long without it..


16

まぐろ (also written as マグロ and 鮪) is the Japanese word for thunnus, a specific kind of tuna. It refers to both the living fish and the food. Traditionally, まぐろ also referred to billfish because billfish was considered to be a close kind to thunnus. Because of this, even today まぐろ can also refer to billfish. ツナ comes from the English word tuna and it refers ...


16

This answer from another site claims that しゃけ is an accent difference in Saitama, Chiba, Shizuoka (basically Kantou). http://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/11481.html But, when I did a part-time job at an 居酒屋(いざかや) during my college time in 四国 (Shikoku - not in Kantou region) around 2005, some people used しゃけ. I didn't know the meaning at that time, and some people ...


15

西瓜(すいか)is a Japanese word, borrowed from the Chinese. It is not known exactly when watermelons arrived in Japan, though it was most likely after the Muromachi period (1333-1573 CE). Words which are native to Japan, borrowed from China, or borrowed a long time ago tend to be written in Kanji and Hiragana. Incidentally, 「西」means west and 「瓜」means melon or ...


15

This depends on the type of the words. As for easy and common words, such as 桜, 犬, 蚊, they are usually written in kanji. These are written in katakana only in biological contexts. 常用漢字表 generally tells us what is considered easy and standard in modern Japanese. If you wrote "東京はサクラがきれいです" or "イヌを飼いたいと思う", that would look unnatural. Relatively difficult ...


13

食べ物 - appropriate as written or spoken language, a basic word, commonly used in speech 食品 - food product, think of a packaged food product on a shelf in the store ご飯 - literally rice (polite), used to refer to "a meal" as in breakfast, lunch or dinner 食事 - a meal, frequently used in hotels and restaurants as 「お[食事]{しょくじ}」 〜物 - assuming you mean 揚げ物 (...


13

ご飯 (ごはん), 飯 (めし) and ライス all refer to the same thing: steamed rice. ご飯 and 飯 can mean meal, too. As you said, it is not uncommon to see ライス in a menu at a restaurant, even when it is not part of a compound word such as カレーライス. I do not know why they do not say ご飯, and I can only make a guess at possible reasons: As Jeshii said, they may want to make it ...


13

If explained within the framework of Tinbergen's four questions: (don't take it much seriously) The proximate explanation is, because it's a convention in the biological society. In academic field, every creature's name is written in katakana when it refers to a equivalent of a scientific name. It once was even required by law (though it didn't state ...


12

There's really no difference other than politeness. But politeness is a huge difference in Japanese. For instance, if we take it to the extreme, saying that there's no difference between あなた and 貴様 in Japanese is like saying there's no difference between "Thank you" and "Go to hell." in English. :) 飯 is not as outrageously impolite as 貴様, but in some ...


12

Yes, there is the more broad term 鯨肉 (げいにくor くじらにく). However, because this term usually refers to whale meat, イルカ肉 is more common to distinguish between the two. Also, I should mention that the likelihood of you ever having the chance to eat dolphin meat nowadays is very slim, unless you travel to Wakayama prefecture perhaps. In the past, in some areas, ...


12

There is a clear difference (no pun intended) between 日本酒 and 清酒. The clue is in the kanji 「清」 = "clear". Technically speaking, 清酒 is one of the two main types of 日本酒 --- 1) 清酒 and 2) にごり[酒]{ざけ}. The former is refined and colorless and the latter, unrefined and cloudy. Informally, however, quite a few native speakers use 日本酒 and 清酒 fairly interchangeably.


12

「かけ」 vs. 「つけ」 Those are two of the more common serving styles of udon. 「かけ」 comes in one (large) bowl with both the broth and noodles in it. With 「つけ」, the noodles and broth are served separately for you to do your "dipping and dunking". You get the noodles in a dish or shallow bamboo basket and the broth in a small bowl/cup. That bamboo basket is ...


11

It is a "rice ball", usually with some kind of meat inside and wrapped in seaweed (similar to sushi). Unlike sushi though, which you hold and eat with chopsticks, an onigiri is made to hold in the hand. The o- is an honorific prefix. It is used to give respect to an object or person, and is done with several choice words (including o-sushi). This ...


11

As a fact-based answer, there is nothing much to say besides that コ here stands for コーン (corn). However, I'm pretty sure that the exact word form バタコチーズライス is chosen because it makes a reference to two major characters in the famous children manga/anime series アンパンマン, namely バタコ (a female baker) and チーズ (dog). (from the left: チーズ, バタコ, ジャムおじさん)


10

I can get into this answer a bit because I'm lactose intolerant, or as it is called in Japanese, 乳糖{にゅうとう}不{ふ}耐症{たいしょう}. Despite the fact that genetically, all Japanese should most likely also all be lactose intolerant, outside of medical practitioners, most people have never heard the term, and so usually it's easier to just say I have a milk allergy (牛乳{...


10

The 丼 donburi in 牛丼 gyūdon specifically denotes a bowl of rice. The 飯 meshi in 牛飯 gyūmeshi just means rice or even more generically meal. Both describe the same thing: ぎゅう‐どん【牛丼】 「牛飯(ぎゅうめし)」に同じ。 "See gyūmeshi." ぎゅう‐めし【牛飯】 ネギなどと煮た牛肉を、汁とともにかけたどんぶり飯。牛丼(ぎゅうどん)。 "A rice meal with onions and fried beef [...]. Gyūdon." I'm not sure which one is ...


10

In terms of the “substances” they could refer to, ミルク includes 牛乳, plus all the other examples that are given, like baby formula, creamer, and even semen (when used as sexual innuendo). To keep it simple, let’s just say the “substance” we want to refer to is 牛乳. As long as it is clear in the context that you mean 牛乳, it isn’t technically wrong to use ミルク in ...


10

「[割]{わ}る」 here means "to dilute". See meaning #II-4 in http://kotobank.jp/jeword/%E5%89%B2%E3%82%8B?dic=pje3&oid=SPJE04759100 「[泡盛]{あわもり}のコーヒー割り」 = "awamori diluted with coffee" Other common terms containing 「割り」: ウイスキーのソーダ割り/[水]{みず}割り [焼酎]{しょうちゅう}のウーロン[茶]{ちゃ}割り


9

ライス is used for non-Japanese rice dishes, I believe, like curry or rice served on a plate in Western fashion. カタカナ and borrowed words are also used as 'fancy' or 'elegant' alternatives in Japan, especially in advertising.


9

Your hypothesis that カツ stems from cutlet seems correct. According to kotobank, カツ is the shortened form of カツレツ, i.e. cutlet. See here for its culinary history.


9

That is 薬研{やげん} in Japanese. By the way, I've heard of 薬研堀{やげんぼり} but never known 薬研 itself.


9

Before cooking rice, many people wash the rice by "grinding" (hence 研ぐ) the individual grains against one another under flowing water until the water runs more or less clear. (In the olden days the purpose of the grinding was to remove the hull (糠【ぬか】).) In the process of this, together with rest of the hulls and dust, minerals and starch are also removed. ...


9

Here are examples of what most people (including myself, a native speaker) actually say: チーズバーガー、1つ。 One cheese burger. ウーロン茶、L。 Oolong tea, L. 以上で。 That's it. Suica/クレジットカードで。 With Suica (electronic money)/credit card. I usually do not even say ありがとう(ございます), so your observation in Japan was correct. That said, if you feel you took more time than usual as ...


9

気楽な corresponds to 気が楽 and describes feeling at ease or relaxed, a semi-literal translation of the latter might be "ease of mind". "Easy" itself has several meanings in English, and "easy to drink" would not necessarily be interpreted as meaning the opposite of "technically difficult to drink". In any case, translating 気楽なお酒 as an "easy drink" would be ...


8

つまむ can mean "to grab," so anything you can just grab casually and eat (usually with some sort of alcohol), or anything you can つまむ, is therefore おつまみ. There's lots of words that are just the noun conjugation of verbs, especially in food! (おにぎり、煮物、おひや... okay, not all of those follow the pattern, but you get the idea!) There's also another word つまみ食い, which ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible