24

Since this is a formal statement, it's better to keep 私の. But people can understand the sentence without it because they know it's your profile. What's worse about your sentence is that your sentence has a number of bad word choices and grammatical errors. 生むています is always ungrammatical. The te-form of 生む is 生んで. There is a subject-predicate mismatch. ...


9

This is not really an answer, but I would like to draw the attention to the distinction between speech in fictional work and speech in the real world. In fictional work, there is a set of words (most notably personal pronouns and function words) which are considered to be typical to a certain group of people, regardless of whether the people in the same ...


9

Yes, young children and young women often refer to themselves by their first name. There is the notion that it is cute and women will use it when talking to close family members, etc. If an adult male would use it, it would sound very effeminate. Also, when an adult women uses it, some people consider that she is trying to look cute on purpose and be turned ...


9

Quoting Wikipedia: 「おれ」は「おのれ」の転訛で、鎌倉時代以前は二人称として使われたが次第に一人称に移行し、江戸時代には貴賎男女を問わず幅広く使われた。明治以降になると共通語では女性の使用者はほぼいなくなったが、東北地方を中心に方言では根強く残っている。愛知県西三河地方でも農業地区では女性の一人称として平成の今日に至っても使用されている事例がある。 また、アクセントは平板型(「れ」の方が高く、それとほぼ同じ音高で後の語が開始する)が一般的であるが、一部地域[どこ?]では「お」にアクセントを付けて使用することもある。 西日本では年をとると「わし」に移行することが多い。特に広島などでは「俺」は気取った一人称とされ、通常の場ではあまり使われない。 Translation: ...


7

In English, we know how to talk like a pirate, even those classical pirates are no more around (aye, pirates still exist, but they tend to speak Somali or whatever...). What is stereotypical accent today often did originally have the speakers, but gradually faded away with the lapse of time only to remain in people's memory. So-called Standard Japanese was ...


7

The pronoun associations you're looking for—old men use washi, tomboys use boku and so on—are more a trope of fiction than of real life (to an extent, even things like "women's speech" are more a prescription or ideal than an accurate description of real-world speech patterns). Luckily, someone has been studying exactly those tropes: Satoshi Kinsui, who ...


7

According to WWWJDIC via Rikaichan: 俺 おれ、 だいこう、 ないこう (pn,adj-no,male) I; me (rough or arrogant-sounding first-person pronoun, formerly also used by women); (P) So it seems that it used to be a gender-neutral noun.


7

In informal settings, you might use あたし達, to your parents-in-law you might use 私達, and in business settings, you might use 我々 or 私共. It can depend on many things, including possibly your gender, but it doesn't generally depend on whether there is somebody of the other gender in the group you refer to. The Japanese plural marker 達 as well as ら and others ...


6

First, I am not sure that /ora/ really belongs in this category. Most dictionaries simply list it as a variant of /ore/. But /oira/ is pretty unanimously agreed to derive from /orera/, 俺 + 等 as you say, so I will stick to discussion of that one. (In any case, presumably whatever applies to /oira/ would also apply to /ora/ if indeed they were the same /-ra/.) ...


6

There is not such verb as 出来上げる, although 出来上がる (intransitive) and 作り上げる (transitive) exist. No one can possess a verb. That の after 我々/私たち is a subject marker, which can replace が only in relative clauses. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? 我々 and 私たち are always first person and plural pronouns, of course. And I don't know why you think they behave ...


6

This is not uncommon in business settings. For one, 「田中はOKです。」 is easier to type and more concise than 「田中です。私はOKです。」. For one, they may be trying to be fair and businesslike. Using their own family names signals they are treating themselves the same way as other colleagues, from the third person's perspective. The person who says 田中の分 referring to himself ...


5

While I'm not an old Japanese man, I disagree with your first point. People do choose how to refer to themselves. I've gone through quite a few stages myself, and so do most people around. Some men stick to 私, others use 僕, おれ, おら, or some other personal pronoun. I think two things are at play: Whether it's appropriate to use a given pronoun. Whether you'...


5

オレ, おれ and 俺 are used by males and mean “I” or “me”. Their meanings are same but their nuances are different. Whether オレ, おれ or 俺 is used depends on the speaker’s or the author’s preference. The lyricist of the song could have written it in other ways like so: オレはコイツと おれはコイツと おれはこいつと 俺はこいつと 俺はコイツと 俺は此奴と But he chose オレはこいつと, maybe because it fits the ...


5

パパ, お父さん, 僕, and 俺 are used when the children are young. パパ is less used when they become adults. But お父さん, 僕, and 俺 are still used when they become adults. Switching their personal pronoun doesn’t always occur, but I think 僕 and 俺 rarely change to パパ and お父さん. パパ and お父さん has an air of viewing their children as kids, though many fathers call themselves パパ ...


4

Yes, I've heard 奴 used to refer to females before. Of course, it is more frequently used to refer to males. But remember that the rules of grammar and convention are not so strict in casual, colloquial conversation (which is typically where 奴 is used to refer to anyone). Although I've never heard a female refer to herself as 奴 before, I've heard college-age ...


4

Wikipedia says: (あたくしは)あたしのきどった言い方である。一般的には昭和時代の漫画やアニメなどで使用された例があるが、平常的には聞くことはまずない言い方である。特に落語家が使用する。 In my opinion あたくし (not わたくし) is typically used by Kantō, classy, pompous, elder, female celebrities, mainly in fiction. Or by someone who impersonates such a person. I confirmed that 黒柳徹子 uses あたくし in her TV show 徹子の部屋 (video). Someone says that she is ...


4

I think Japanese males don't use watashi in casual conversations but females use it. If males use it in casual conversations, it may make one sounds overly stiff and aloof as you say. 自分 is often used in Japanese sports community. They has strict age hierarchy in regards to using polite manners, it is called 体育会系. So 自分 includes the meaning of humility. It ...


4

It is true that てめえ (てめぇ/てめー) is a contracted form of 手前, but they are used very differently today, so it's probably better to think of them as different words. As you probably know, てめぇ is almost always a rough second-person pronoun, but it is occasionally used like a first-person pronoun meaning "myself" or "自分". This first-person usage is mainly found in ...


3

When speaking about oneself 私{わたし} is always OK for both genders for any age. For boys (and some tomboys) 僕{ぼく} is also used. You may also hear あたし which is used by slightly older females (High School age onwards) in casual situations. A: If you know their name then their name. Else あなた or 君 or 私/僕(if they have already referred to themselves as such). B: ...


3

If somebody calls other one ~~奴, I'll assume the referent is the speaker's close (often the same-sex) friend, or someone has frictions with him/her, or s/he is casually mentioning an unspecified person. There's no gender restrictions anyway. As an aside, 奴 can colloquially refer things whose names are unclear to the speaker or hearer, in this case it's even ...


3

There are no such differences in terms of nuances that you point out. Both are not rude and can be used for 4,5 people. 私たち and われわれ are always interchangeable without making the sentence rude or improper. Instead, it changes an impression a bit. われわれ sounds slightly more academic or political while 私たち sounds slightly softer. Or I can say われわれ, in any ...


3

That depends on age, dialect, personal preferences etc. But a very stereotypical way would be to use わし as first person singular personal pronoun and じゃ as copula.


2

First things first, it was actually this, 「私の魔法も効かないし、これって。。。」not 「これで。。。」 You certainly could use 私{わたし}, but you certainly could use 私{わたくし}.


2

余 is one for a classic king or a person of equivalent status. Here are some characters whose first person pronoun is 余: 徳川茂々(『銀魂』) Tokugawa Shigeshige (from Gintama,) a shogun メルエム(ハンター×ハンター) Meruem (from Hunter x Hunter,) the king of the Chimera Ants Moreover, though I can't remember certain character, 余 is also known as 殿様(lord)-ish pronoun.


2

It's a tomboy sort of thing. Also, girls that hang around more often with boys sometimes pick that up as a matter of asserting their identity as one of the guys.


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