41

This question frequently comes up among foreigners in Japan, especially men, as it seems there's a feeling that sticking with 私{わたし} is somehow too "textbook". It's as if using 私{わたし} is an indication of still learning, or perhaps not yet having been integrated into Japanese language and culture enough. Men often wonder if they should use 僕{ぼく}, or 俺{おれ} ...


24

It depends a lot on the situation. I try to keep it simple and only use three most practical forms of the pronoun: 僕 (boku) :: I use it whenever I am not at work 俺 (ore) :: Almost never use 俺 unless most people around me are already using 俺, too informal. 私 (watashi) :: What I always use at work. Never ever use boku at work, or in an email, since somebody ...


24

Since this is a formal statement, it's better to keep 私の. But people can understand the sentence without it because they know it's your profile. What's worse about your sentence is that your sentence has a number of bad word choices and grammatical errors. 生むています is always ungrammatical. The te-form of 生む is 生んで. There is a subject-predicate mismatch. ...


22

Are you a man? Are you a manly man? Use ore (俺). Are you a girly man? Use boku (僕). Are you being formal, unwilling to commit to 俺 or 僕, or just starting to learn Japanese? Use watashi (私). Are you a girl? Are you a girly girl? Use atashi (あたし). (This rule isn't as fixed as the male rule). Are you a tomboy? Use boku (僕). Otherwise use watashi. Are you ...


18

Like pretty much all pronoun (hell, all politeness-level related) issues in Japanese, there just isn't an absolute answer: it's all down to context and to the nature of your relationship with the listener. The short answer is: a lot less rude than you may have been led to believe I do remember being given very stern warnings (in manuals or language lessons)...


14

私- canonical, formal form. わたくし more formal and stiff than わたし 僕- most for young men, but older men sometimes use it (it still has the young man feeling to it) as well as some middle schoolish girls (still has young man feeling... Just imagine the middle school girls you know) 俺- use if you're a guy, and only among friends or when you feel like not being ...


13

For the younger generations, the rude connotations seem to be disappearing fast. I spent considerable time with Japanese in their '20s over the past two years and the vast majority of males consistently used 俺 to refer to themselves in casual situations. Many of them were far removed from the type of personality that wants to present themselves as rude in ...


10

To add a little bit more to what YOU said in his answer: in some Classical Japanese texts これ was indeed used as a first (and also second) person pronoun. It's not the most common first person pronoun in Classical Japanese (that would probably be われ), but it's a possible use, so maybe that's where your dictionary got that from. The quote from 枕草子 (The Pillow ...


10

うち is mostly used by girls to refer to themselves, but this usage is only common in Kansai-ben and perhaps other regional dialects as well, and it is generally not considered to be part of standard Japanese. See http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q148192694 So to answer your question, yes if a guy says うち, he is probably most likely ...


9

Update: I didn't comment on the fact that speaking about oneself can also be a matter of using "he" or "she" for oneself, as well as using one's own name. I have never heard anyone in Japanese use 彼【かれ】(he) or 彼女【かのじょ】(she) to refer to themselves. As far as I can tell, it has more or less the same implications that it would in English, and you can follow ...


9

My question is, is this use as a general gender-neutral 私 substitute correct (in cases where there is no particular need to assert oneself against others)? There is no intrinsic gender specificity in 自分, as opposed to 爺さん/婆さん. In actual usage, it's mainly used by male speakers (source: Daijirin). Speaking from experience, I have the impression that ...


9

It's not always that interchangeable, as it has the meaning of ("my-", "your-", "one-") "self": 僕が嫌い。 - I don't like it. 自分が嫌い。- I don't like myself. I'd translate 自分はスポーツが嫌い。 more along the lines of As for me, I hate sports. I'd expect this to be preceded by a discussion of other people's abilities or tastes in sport, the 自分 serving as a ...


9

Yes, young children and young women often refer to themselves by their first name. There is the notion that it is cute and women will use it when talking to close family members, etc. If an adult male would use it, it would sound very effeminate. Also, when an adult women uses it, some people consider that she is trying to look cute on purpose and be turned ...


9

Quoting Wikipedia: 「おれ」は「おのれ」の転訛で、鎌倉時代以前は二人称として使われたが次第に一人称に移行し、江戸時代には貴賎男女を問わず幅広く使われた。明治以降になると共通語では女性の使用者はほぼいなくなったが、東北地方を中心に方言では根強く残っている。愛知県西三河地方でも農業地区では女性の一人称として平成の今日に至っても使用されている事例がある。 また、アクセントは平板型(「れ」の方が高く、それとほぼ同じ音高で後の語が開始する)が一般的であるが、一部地域[どこ?]では「お」にアクセントを付けて使用することもある。 西日本では年をとると「わし」に移行することが多い。特に広島などでは「俺」は気取った一人称とされ、通常の場ではあまり使われない。 Translation: ...


9

This is not really an answer, but I would like to draw the attention to the distinction between speech in fictional work and speech in the real world. In fictional work, there is a set of words (most notably personal pronouns and function words) which are considered to be typical to a certain group of people, regardless of whether the people in the same ...


8

あたし is quite common for females, but 僕 is not that much. In my feeling, 僕 has some romantic sense, so using 僕 when you talk to girls should be no problem at all. (Note that I use romatic sense here is for non-family members, and non-closed friends) Japanese use 俺 a lot recently, and here is a report about usage about 僕 and 俺 第1期 - 1895~1935, 第2期 - 1966-...


7

According to WWWJDIC via Rikaichan: 俺 おれ、 だいこう、 ないこう (pn,adj-no,male) I; me (rough or arrogant-sounding first-person pronoun, formerly also used by women); (P) So it seems that it used to be a gender-neutral noun.


7

In informal settings, you might use あたし達, to your parents-in-law you might use 私達, and in business settings, you might use 我々 or 私共. It can depend on many things, including possibly your gender, but it doesn't generally depend on whether there is somebody of the other gender in the group you refer to. The Japanese plural marker 達 as well as ら and others ...


7

In English, we know how to talk like a pirate, even those classical pirates are no more around (aye, pirates still exist, but they tend to speak Somali or whatever...). What is stereotypical accent today often did originally have the speakers, but gradually faded away with the lapse of time only to remain in people's memory. So-called Standard Japanese was ...


7

The pronoun associations you're looking for—old men use washi, tomboys use boku and so on—are more a trope of fiction than of real life (to an extent, even things like "women's speech" are more a prescription or ideal than an accurate description of real-world speech patterns). Luckily, someone has been studying exactly those tropes: Satoshi Kinsui, who ...


6

The key is the これを大きくなってから見る in the first line. The subject on both sides of the te-form is the same (自分). 1 If it (the baby) was me, I would surely be moved if I saw this after I grew up. 2 That this cat, who I had been living with without thinking anything much of it, 3 had been snuggling up affectionately to me from such a long time ago (/young age)...


6

I would say nuance of ラルク song is different with other manga texts. あなたは いつまでも この僕のこと 愛してくれたのかな この僕 in above sentence is more like こんな僕, kind of humble. Will you ever love me even if I were such ... But, other sentences on manga are trying to express himself superior だが このオレは 死なん... No wonder, I won't die (such easily) こんどは このオレが きさまを 滅ぼす, ...


6

Not much of an answer, but between myself and my native speaker girlfriend, we both thought the same thing, "It's the exact same in meaning and sense to 私/僕 or any of those, but it's definitely less formal." At the same time, I don't think that means it's particularly informal; I just believe that the rigidity of the business language prescribes 私【わたくし・わたし】 ...


6

The choice of first-person pronoun depends on the level of formality in the current context. During (formal) interviews I have heard わたし about 90% of the time, わたくし occasionally, and ぼく only rarely. However, during informal conversations, it is quite common to hear ぼく or おれ. I prefer おれ personally, but anecdotally, I have had a native Japanese tell me he ...


6

First, I am not sure that /ora/ really belongs in this category. Most dictionaries simply list it as a variant of /ore/. But /oira/ is pretty unanimously agreed to derive from /orera/, 俺 + 等 as you say, so I will stick to discussion of that one. (In any case, presumably whatever applies to /oira/ would also apply to /ora/ if indeed they were the same /-ra/.) ...


6

There is not such verb as 出来上げる, although 出来上がる (intransitive) and 作り上げる (transitive) exist. No one can possess a verb. That の after 我々/私たち is a subject marker, which can replace が only in relative clauses. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? 我々 and 私たち are always first person and plural pronouns, of course. And I don't know why you think they behave ...


6

You will hear it used mostly in fiction predominantly by working-class male characters (period dramas come to mind first) and when used in fiction it is often fairly clearly pronounced 「あちし」. In real life, 「あちし」 is not pronounced clearly as in fiction. It is more often how 「あたし」 can sometimes sound like rather than how it is actually pronounced ...


6

As @user4092 stated in the comment above, there exists no such first-person pronoun in the so-called Standard Japanese. If there existed one, someone would have answered this question as soon as you posted it. I could think of two such pronouns used in other dialects. One of them is 「わ」 used in Tsugaru dialect (Aomori Prefecture). This dialect is known ...


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