8

He may have read a story similar to this one: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/moshi-moshi/ (See "Foxes" Section on that page) Excerpt: "The explanation that seems the most plausible because it's actually supported by facts. On 12/16/1890, phones were 1st introduced to 日本. At the time, only rich people were were able to afford telephones. Being rich, they ...


7

Much as described in the question comments by Yang Muye and blutorange, 1) all of these sumu verbs derive from Old Japanese in ways that make the kanji irrelevant to a discussion of etymology, and 2) all of the modern senses of sumu arise from an underlying idea of to settle. Interestingly, the English term to settle covers most of the same meanings as the ...


5

Both links explain that フリーマーケット comes from "flea market" not "free market" but the term needs some disambiguation. 蚤 (のみ)is the 漢字 for flea and the プログレッシブ dictionary lists 蚤の市 as "a flea market" The following extract from your second link explains the above and that フリー is not "free" but "flea": [Q:]...


5

Several dictionaries (大辞林, 大辞泉, 明鏡, 日本大百科全書) list ベビーカー specifically as wasei-eigo from "baby" and "car", e.g. ベビーカー 〔和 baby+car〕 (I also checked 現代カタカナ語辞典 by 旺文社, but this doesn't have an entry for ベビーカー!) Moreover, as @bjorn & @ericfromabeno say in the comments, "carriage" is usually キャリッジ and a loan of "baby carriage" would more likely have been ...


5

From the entry of 精選版日本国語大辞典: ※闇桜(1892)〈樋口一葉〉「あらマア何(どう)しませうねへ」 So the word form is attested at least since late 19th century. As you said, this is a combination of あら + まあ. あら can be traced back to the 10th century and まあ to the 18th century with basically the same meaning as in today (interjection of amazement). ※落窪(10C後)一「あらことごとし」 ※洒落本・妓者呼子鳥(1777)四「...


4

In Japanese, phonetic equivalence is generally a very poor predictor of common etymology. Japanese is well known as having a preponderance of homophones, mostly due to the accretion of possible readings for each kanji which has developed over the centuries. But even among wago (和語), verbs ending in 'eru' are extremely common. Still, it is always worth ...


3

You normally use くだ. The reading of かん is a kind of jargon among construction industry.


3

These are transitive and intransitive forms of verbs. English has them too, but often they're identical. Transitive verbs take "direct" objects, intransitive ones don't. I raise my hand vs My hand rises In English, raise is transitive, and rise is intransitive. Similarly, 何かを入れる vs 何かが入る 入れる is transitive, 入る is intransitive. Case markings make it pretty ...


3

Note that 先生 does not strictly mean "teacher". 先生 is used as a title toward many types of superiours/leaders with some kind of expertise: teachers, doctors, lawyers, politicians, even the pastor at my Christian church. See this link for more information about applicability. 先 - Means "previous" or "before" 生 - Means "...


2

The "popular theory" linked from the question suggests both that the Japanese expression may have come from the Malay, or that the Malay expression may have come from from the Japanese. The Japanese あらまあ (ara mā) Broccoli's answer covers the Japanese. In short: あらまあ is purely Japanese, composed of purely Japanese elements and formulated in a purely ...


2

This may be a well-known folktale, but it isn't the real etymology at all (and sounds much more like a folk etymology than a real one anyway). もしもし is a contraction of 「申し、申し」, i.e. 'speaking, speaking', said as a way to confirm to the caller that their call had connected. The particular word 申す was chosen to avoid any accidental impoliteness caused by not ...


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