18

「[Noun] + 仕立{じた}て」 means: "made in the [Noun] style" 「ビアホール」 is an establishment where people gather for the main purpose of drinking draft beer in huge beer mugs. When I first saw your question, I was going to say that 「ビアホール」 was a 和製英語{わせいえいご} (= "an English word created by the Japanese"), but I have found this place in the U.S., so I am not so ...


15

In this case, it would be read as [一日]{いち・にち} which just means "(one) day" as opposed to [一日]{≪ついたち≫} which means first of the month. My gut says that in this case 一日 is acting like "your day" in particular, trying to evoke your subjective answer of how it was in particular for you. If she had just asked you 「どんな[日]{ひ}でしたか?」, it would sound to me like a ...


11

Culturally, Japanese people are not as publicly direct about their deepest feelings. In English speaking cultures, we use the phrase "I love you" a LOT. It can be for an intimate relationship, or it can be used for a best friend with no romantic undertones. You won't hear the Japanese people say 愛している the same way Americans tend to use the English ...


9

お気をつけください is a politer/more respectful way of saying 気をつけてください. It's the honorific 「お + noun form/連用形 + ください」 form. Examples: 「待ってください。」 "Please wait" (noun form/連用形 of 待つ is 待ち) → 「お+待ち+ください。」 「話してください。」 "Please speak" (noun form/連用形 of 話す is 話し) → 「お+話し+ください。」 「注意してください。」 "Please be careful" (for kango you generally use ご) → 「ご+注意+ください。」 Likewise: ...


8

Different Meanings of 「ところ」 「悪{わる}いところを見つかった。」 is at least colloquially a valid phrase meaning: "(Someone) was caught at an awkward moment." In this expression, 「ところ」 means a "scene" or "moment" where an action takes place. 「~~を見つかる」 is not a structure you would use in formal speech, but that can be said about a million other words and phrases. ...


8

From today's perspective, it might as well be called a sample of anastrophe. However, not many words other than 乞う use this type of formula. Etymologically, it comes from a specific practice in the 漢文訓読 tradition. There is a Chinese verb 請 "treat" that is also used as if English "please". This "interjectory" 請 is often read out at the original place instead ...


7

Sorry, I didn't understand (I am not English native) if you by "dream" in this case meant: 1) An aspiration / "target that is difficult to achieve" 2) Something that you "see" when you are asleep (and, if this was the case, one which is repeating, ie the person is asking when you for the first time saw the reappearing dream / nightmare) Luckily ゆめ works ...


7

Here's the list of examples from BCCWJ. We can see the idiom 旗色が悪い can be safely used in non-military contexts, but is always used in the context of argument, debate, competition, or at least comparison of two opposing ideas. It should not be used to describe simple failures without competitors, rivals, enemies, etc. I feel 私の商売は大損失で旗色が悪くなった on its own ...


6

To me, who is a Japanese-speaker, 「圧力開放{あつりょくかいほう}」 is not a word describing a human emotion. It is only a technical term meaning "pressure release". I would not use it myself, but you are not me. Here are some phrases that could be used naturally with Japanese-speakers. Nouns & Noun Phrases: ・「解放感{かいほうかん}」 ・「心{こころ}が休{やす}まる感{かん}じ」 ・「解放された/[解]{と}...


6

どのくらい夢がありましたか may be interpreted as "How many dreams did you have?" rather than “How long have you had this dream?”. I think "どのくらいこの夢を持ち続けていますか?" is more an appropriate translation for “How long have you had this dream?”.


6

There is no single all-purpose phrase in Japanese that can be called the exact equivalent of "to get to" in English. The ones that are not very wordy would include: 「~できる」、「~できるようになる」、「できることになる」 「~させてもらえる」 「~ていい」、「~ていいことになる」 The phrases that are wordy but still carry approximately the same meaning or nuance would include: 「~する / できるチャンスを得{え}る / もらう」 「~...


6

As a Sino-Japanese compound, 正解 is more formal, and this is the word used in serious examinations and serious quiz shows. 当たり is more casual and colloquial, and it's mainly used for a riddle, a quick quiz, a "guess what" type question, or such. 当たり also refers to a completely random "win" or "hit" as in roulette or lootboxes. In this case, 当たり is not ...


6

If you were speaking then こちらこそ alone would be fine, but since it is email, I think it would be best to add ご無沙汰しています。 こちらこそ、ご無沙汰しています。 This is to avoid the disconnect of "こちらこそ about what?" If she is even a little 目上 or you just want to express added politeness change the います to おります。 こちらこそ、ご無沙汰しております。 Both of these versions can be modified with ...


6

know that 就{つ}くmeans “to be hired”. While that is not incorrect, I would rather suggest that you remember the meaning as "to assume a position". Why? Because while 「就く」 is in the active-voice form, "to be hired" is in the passive voice. The 「就く」 in the sentence: 「全員{ぜんいん}、守備{しゅび}に就{つ}くため走{はし}った。」 is not all that different in that it means: "...


6

それ here is an interjection (感動詞). It's like 掛け声. デジタル大辞泉 says: それ【其れ】 ➁[感]人に注意を促すときなどに発する語。そら。ほら。「其れ見なさい」「其れ行け」 The pronoun それ (for "that") is [それ]{LH}. The interjection それ is [それ]{HL}.


5

My Japanese is not that good, but I'm pretty sure the word is "mazui" 「まずい」 不味い The example 4 fits the situation.


5

「これでもか」 is an expression used rather heavily in mostly informal speech. I would suggest that you think of it as an embedded question within a longer sentence. The 「か」 is indeed a question marker. This should also explain why the quotative particle 「と」 or 「って」 will always follow. 「これでも」, by itself, means "even (with) this (amount/degree)." So, what is ...


5

「建物{たてもの}がとても高{たか}くて僕{ぼく}は足{あし}がすくんだ。」 is a perfectly natural-sounding sentence (with excellent particle choices). Your use of 「足がすくむ」 is just very appropriate here. Colloquially, young people might go with 「ビビりまくる」 or 「ビビる」 instead of 「足がすくむ」 in that situation. I myself would try to sound funny (and probably fail) by saying 「足がむくんだ。」 or 「足がむくんじゃった」 by ...


5

そんなに聞いてほしいなら言えばいいのに。 It can mean "If you want to be heard (or, want your story heard, want me to listen to you) so much, you should just say so. / why don't you just say so?" ~~ばいいのに can mean "You should do~~ (but you haven't done so)" or "You should have done~~ (but you didn't do so)" (cf. past tense ~ばよかったのに。) Example: 「君も来ればいいのに。」 "You should come, ...


4

This て is the same as って, the colloquial quotative particle similar to と. The small-tsu is unheard because it's located at the beginning of the sentence. (When written, this っ is usually omitted at the beginning of a sentence, but may be preserved in casual light novels and such.) It may be obvious to you, but this (っ)て refers to what was said in the ...


4

There is a useful explanation of this phrase at this link here. A quick summary is as follows: The 袂 (たもと) is a part of the sleeve of the kimono which hangs down to the side, sometimes even stretching below the hands. In fact, the word たもと appears to be a variant of 手元 (てもと). As such, the word took on the additional meaning of 'beside', 'next to' (see ...


4

Meaning-wise and grammar-wise, this sentence is perfect. Indeed it is harsh, but it may be rightly so; there are situations you may need to write an email like this one. Anyone who has received it will notice his/her overall work attitude is severely doubted.


4

映り込み is one option, but if you want a more catchy and specific word, there is a word 見切れ【みきれ】, which is a noun form of the verb 見切れる. 見切れ 見切れ、見切れるとは、メインの被写体以外のもの(特に見えていてはいけないもの)が画像、映像、視界などに入ることである。舞台や映像業界の用語。 For example, Origami Cyclone is an anime character who is a serious "photobomber", and he is known as 見切れ職人 ("Artisan of 見切れ") in the Japanese ...


4

What's your problem? - used for asking someone in a threatening way why they are behaving in a way that you do not like or approve of. I think you can say... 何か気に[入]{い}らないことでも あるの/あるわけ/あるのか? 何が 気に入らないの/気に入らないんだよ? 何か文句でも あるの/あるわけ/あるのか? (いったい)なんなの / なんなんだよ!? どういうつもり / なんのつもり(だよ)!? 何考えてんの / 何考えてんだよ!? 頭おかしいんじゃない の/のか!? etc... depending on the ...


4

When expressions are shortened, they are usually considered less formal and thus sound less polite. This applies to では vs. じゃ: じゃ is less formal and thus sounds less polite (but can sound more friendly). Other common examples include: しては vs. しちゃ, している vs. してる, しておく vs. しとく, してしまう vs. しちゃう, すれば vs. すりゃ, しなければ vs. しなきゃ.


4

As with many things in Japanese (informal language in particular), this is based on context. If you meet someone for the first time in a while, it would make sense to ask them if they are well, rather than asking them if they think you look well. Pronouns are often dropped when it is obvious who is being refereed to. Unlike many other languages there is no ...


4

You're absolutely right about いいえ not being used as "no" in most cases. I can't recall the last time I heard a native speaker actually use it. Here are some of the most common ways I've heard the meaning of "no" being expressed: 違うよ - "to differ". Speaker 1: お寿司が大好きだったよね? Speaker 2: 違うよ!お寿司が嫌い! ううん Speaker 1: もう寝る? ...


4

You don't seem to be parsing it correctly, I'm afraid... I think you could probably parse it as something like... [〝正しいこと〟なんて描くつもりも]、[描ける程、自分を上等とも思ってい]ないけど... And you could split it to: →〝正しいこと〟なんて描くつもりもない + (〝正しいこと〟が)描ける程、自分を上等とも思っていないけど... 「XXもYYも~~ない」(or 「XXもないしYYも~~ない」) = "neither XX nor YY"


4

This may be a somewhat controversial, but I'm not really a fan of Sara Backer's take on the spelling. For the lay man, Ng will most likely receive the normal 'N' pronunciation with a hard 'g' sound following it (like in 'golf'). However, knowing what I do about the language, using a soft 'g' actually does get the sound phonetically written into English ...


3

You could interpret the phrase a few ways depending on context, but two main candidates are as follows: A: ずっとそう思っていました。 I had always thought so. B: ずっとそう思っていました。 I have always thought so. In A, the fact that the phrase is in the past tense 思っていました can indicate a change in the opinion of the speaker. It refers to something that the speaker had always ...


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