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Why? "Why" is seldom a useful question to ask when it comes to language and words -- it is awfully broad. :) To narrow the scope a bit, and to focus on the etymology that you mention, let's look at the structure and derivation, and whether these words are related at all. (Note: This gets long.) Analysis tips Underlying word structure You describe &...


6

(Note I'm answering my own question in Q&A style since I thought this would be neat to share.) In order to explain this properly, I have to go into a bit of grammar first, including Old Japanese, but towards the end it'll be clear how it all connects. So in English, we form to-be sentences like "This is an apple." The structure of this sentence ...


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EDIT: With some more research, I found the reason. As I expected, it's due to historical unification of JIS X kanji with Unicode codepoints. Here's a GitHub thread about the issue, including precisely the two characters you asked about. The tl;dr is that the Japanese codepoints corresponding to those characters, which were unified with the Simplified Chinese ...


4

This と is essentially the same as in と言う or と思う. In this case it makes an adverb out of the small sound word before it. Similar examples include ギュッと and ボーッと.


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礼楽 is a fairly uncommon word. It's not very nice to use such a difficult word to explain the meaning of an easy word... Anyway, here its meaning is more of "ritual/ceremony and music" rather than "ritual music". So it's one of the compounds that just mean "A and B", such as 男女, 天地, 山河, 妻子, 文武 and 見聞. Music played by a 堂 doesn't ...


3

From Wikipedia: 日本における漢字表記では濠太剌利とされ、またそこから濠洲(ごうしゅう)とも呼ばれる。「連邦」を付け濠洲連邦(濠洲聯邦)ということもある。「濠」「洲」は常用漢字の「豪」「州」を代用して豪太剌利・豪洲・豪州と書くことも多い。 Your previous confusion of 濠 and 豪 actually makes sense in this context, as 「濠太剌利」「濠洲{ごうしゅう}」「豪洲{ごうしゅう}」are all ateji. Basically the idea is when a non-Chinese foreign word like "Australia" comes to Japan, an attempt is ...


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