10

If you think of cyan in a technical sense, for example as one of the primary colours in the CMYK model (so (100,0,0,0)) (in the RGB model probably (0,255,255)), then in Japanese it would be シアン (シアン on Japanese Wikipedia). As you can find in the Wikipedia article, there are several colour names, which compare to シアン as follows: シアン 青緑【あおみどり】・青緑色【せいりょくしょく】 ...


6

Basically, for very common sounds there is less variance in what onomatopoeia is used, but when it comes to uncommon sounds, there is a lot more diversity. IMO Chainsaw is a relatively uncommon sound, so it's a bit up for grabs. I'd describe it as something like ブィーン (an established onomatopoeia for electrical tools like drills).


6

You're pretty close, but not quite there. 一つになる影 is not become one with shadow. The reason for this is because if you use the structure verb (plain form) + noun, the English equivalent is noun that verbs. Here's an example: マラソンを走る人 Person/people that run(s) marathons Therefore, your attempt translates as follows: 一つになる影 Shadow that becomes one. What ...


5

If you ask Google, イースター休暇 is arguably the most dominant way to refer to Easter holidays, including many expat blogs and information websites like this (a guidebook compared to Lonely Planet in English). However, 復活祭(節)休み, イースター休み would be understood without any strange feeling too, even though it might be a word most people have heard for the first time. ...


5

すごく should be understood as modifying 仕事がていねい. The meaning will be more or less the same as 仕事がすごくていねいだ Note that ていねい is used with "the other" meaning of "careful, thorough, meticulous, accurate, ..." here.


4

First of all, in Japan, クラス usually means a unit of students who study together, not "teaching". So クラスについてどう思いますか? usually means "What do you think of (your) class." For example, an answer would be "私のクラスは、仲が良い(My class are on good terms)". "Class" in "What are you thinking of during class?" means 授業, so it is translated as "授業中に何を考えていますか?" For example, an ...


4

With a cursory glance at that sentence, I think it means something closer to 'Isn't it just that you can't express what you're thinking to people?' 自分の思ってること is 'a thing one is thinking', not necessarily in regards to themselves. 人 here just means 'people generally'; it's not あの人. 伝える is more 'to convey' or 'to express', and 伝えられない is indeed negative ...


4

This is a wordplay analogous to "holy moly" or "see you later alligator". It's completely nonsense except that it sounds somewhat rhythmical and humorous. See 地口 for similar examples. (Note that rhyming in its narrow sense is less important in Japanese.) (EDIT: Or maybe you can think of this as a "prologue to the scat part" ...


4

How about using [嬉]{うれ}しい, such as in: Hanako likes it when Yuki makes new friends. 花子さんは、雪さんに新しい友達ができるのが嬉しい。 花子さんは、雪さんに新しい友達ができると嬉しい。 Hanako likes it when the roads are quiet. 花子さんは、道が静かなのが嬉しい。 花子さんは、道が静かだと嬉しい。 Hanako likes it when her room is being cleaned. 花子さんは、部屋を掃除してもらうのが嬉しい。 花子さんは、部屋を掃除してもらうと嬉しい。


4

The traditional pattern for this is ~人間 (and ~男 "-man", ~女 "-woman", ~娘 "-girl"). You can use 蜘蛛人間 or 蜘蛛男 to describe a character like Marvel's Spider-Man. For example, this episode list of Kamen Rider has many examples of monsters named ~男 (oh, the first episode is exactly about 蜘蛛男, which looks like this). 狼男 is the Japanese ...


4

I would say 「夢を夢で終わらせるな。」 (lit. Don't let your dream end up being a dream.)


3

Based on my limited life experience, what we say idiomatically in such a situation are: みなさんのおかげで~~(することが)できました ~~(することが)できたのはみなさんのおかげです roughly: "I/we owe —'s having been possible to everyone." みなさんの助けがあってこそ~~(することが)できました ~~はみなさんのご協力のたまものです roughly: "— were not possible without everyone's help." Of course, these assume most addressees ...


3

I would use 「~とだけ」 or 「~としか...ない」. 「~~とだけ[言]{い}っている・[書]{か}いてある」「~~としか言っていない・書いていない」 [憲法]{けんぽう}には、~~とだけ書いてある。 憲法には、~~としか書いていない。 憲法は、~~としか言っていない。 His correction was "けんぽうで、みなさんはざいさんけんにかかわらずしぜんきょうじゅけんがあるだけだと言う", but that seems to me like "only" is part of the quote I agree with you. 「~があるだけだと言う」 would mean "It says that you only have ...


3

Basically... 向こう側 refers to a distant place over a big thing (e.g., "the other side of this building", "the country over the sea", "somewhere over the rainbow", "the person over the phone") 反対側 and 逆側 refer to the opposite side of something (e.g, "the other side of a dining table", "the other side of a ...


3

「XXに使う」 means "use (something) for XX". 個人での学習に(サイト内の例文を)使う use (example sentences in the site) for personal learning Examples: 料理に小麦粉を使う use flour for cooking 通勤に自転車を使う use a bicycle for commuting As you may know, お使いください is 尊敬語/honorific language of 使ってください.


3

Translation B is correct. Here's why: "Unknown" is in the passive voice, but 知らない is in the active voice. The literal translation of 知らない物語 is always "story (someone) does not know" rather than "story that is not known". This の is a subject marker rather than a possession marker. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? To say "your unknown story", ...


3

I'm not a native English speaker, but as Eiríkr Útlendi pointed out in the comment section, I feel there is a /ʊ/ sound even in American English (as long as the word is pronounced slowly and clearly). This can be confirmed by several sources on the net. Wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/though#Pronunciation Forvo: https://forvo.com/word/though/ ...


2

Is it considered to be a compound noun, like a bus station? Yes. It's not a suru-verb because we say 延命処置を行う but not 延命処置する. If so, what the part of speech (in Japanese) to represent such constructions? "Compound noun" is 複合名詞 in Japanese. You can find discussions about this in the following questions: Why isn't 日本料理 written as 日本の料理? the omission ...


2

クラスの会えないのは残念です。 "It is unfortunate that the class can't meet." I can understand what you're trying to say, so I think you could leave it as is. If you want it to sound more natural, you could say it like this: [授業]{じゅぎょう}がなくなったのは[残念]{ざんねん}です。lit. It is unfortunate that the classes have been cancelled. (なくなる "gone, disappear" → cancelled) ...


2

意思にしか動くな is ungrammatical, mainly because of に. ~に動く means "to move to ~", as in 南に動く ("to move to the south"). Here, the correct particle you have to use is で. (~の)意思で動く: to act on ~'s will, to act with a purpose 自分の意思で動く: to act on your own volition Then you can combine it with しか and say something like this: ~の意思でしか動かない: to act only ...


2

I think that おかし is not appropriate for your wordplay because "ka" sound doesn't exist in Japanese numbers' sound. I think that おやつ is appropriate, and it is 082.


2

The informal version of "彼女はいつ来ますか?" is "彼女はいつ来るの?" "のか?" is a literary style, and it almost never happens in ordinary conversations in the real world. BE + -ING (eg "She is coming tomorrow") is an English way of expressing future tense. Japanese ている doesn't have such a function. See: https://www.wasabi-jpn.com/...


1

I'd say 彼女はいつ来るの? Just adding の right after the base form of verb works. This rule can be applied to other verbs like 戻る, 帰る, and so on. However, Japanese don't use 彼女, 彼 or 私たち so often. I actually pictured myself speaking and figured out that it would be more natural if we omit subjectives or specify persons' names. e.g. いつ来るの?, Mary はいつ来るの?


1

So you could produce very direct translations involving the Japanese word for opinion, but I don't think that's what you're asking for. If what you're looking for is a natural, easy way to express English sentiments like what's your opinion on ~~? or most relevantly what do you think about ~~?, the phrase you want is probably をどう思う. The link includes plenty ...


1

You can use が and けど. You may know their basic meaning is "but", but they can also be used to give introductory/background information before diving into your main point. これはゲームですが、おもしろいですよ。 これはゲームですけど、おもしろいですよ。 This is a game, and it's fun. 明日【あした】は日曜日【にちようび】ですが、どこに行きたい【いきたい】ですか? 明日は日曜日ですけど、どこにいきたいですか? It's Sunday tomorrow, so where do you want ...


1

To answer your main question directly: Yes, 精度 (seido) can be used to mean "accuracy" or "precision" in most contexts. Nevertheless, in certain contexts, where "accuracy" and "precision" are distinguished (e.g. scientific), there may be better-defined words (e.g. 正確 (seikaku) for "accuracy", 精密 (seimitsu) for ...


1

喜んで~する is more like "to be delighted/honored to do ~". It might be okay if the subject were "I", but you should not use 喜んで when the subject is "you". Instead, you can say 何ができるの or 何をしてくれるの (if the implication is "what can you do for me/us"). 生き残る is "to survive" and 生きていく is "to live on" or "...


1

Let's look at your translation. 今日は9時午前に私が起きた。その後、外でナチョと散歩したからうんちする事ができる。 I find nothing wrong with the first sentence. It may not be the most natural way of saying "I woke up 9 AM." but it does the job. The second sentence, however, needs some fixing. I see your attempt at translating "so" but as user3856370 mentioned, this translates to a different ...


1

自主隔離{じしゅかくり} is one term for 'self-isolation' which has been used in Japanese media. For example, check this article here. For 'quarantine', just 隔離{かくり} is sufficient.


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