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Is the following Japanese sentence negative or positive in English?

訳が分からない (or 訳が分からん, わけわからん, etc) is an extremely common set phrase meaning "nonsensical", "puzzling", "garbled", etc. 訳が分からないこと or 訳の分からないこと as a whole means "gibberish", "rubbish", etc. (解る is ...
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Questions about punctuation in a light novel

Both methods are for emphasizing something, but they are used a little differently. Brackets are used to emphasize important keywords and words with non-standard meanings. Their role partly overlaps ...
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4 votes

Meaning of んでしょう in this context?

Before addressing んでしょう, it bears noting that なんてX{の/なの}でしょう! is itself a common phrase pattern used to express surprise or admiration of something, where X can be an i-adjective (e.g. かわいい), a na-...
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How would you write exaggerated emphasis?

You can do basically something similar to English. 「今夜のコンサートがすごーく楽しみです!」(I think this is a slightly more natural phrasing) You can also use すっごく or すんごく (and honestly I think this way is more common ...
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2 votes
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Usage of は in these sentences

The particle は adds sort of exclusivity in a negative sentence. For example, ビールは[飲]{の}まない。 implies this person might drink other alcoholic drinks, but not beer. ビール is singled out to stress that he ...
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2 votes
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Is there a way to tell which sentences or structures particle wa can replace particle wo for emphasis in?

Short answer would be that you can use ha instead of wo in most cases. One thing you need to be aware of is when Noun + ha can be the subject of the verb. For example, consider Hon wo yomu = (I) read ...
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How would you write exaggerated emphasis?

You sometimes see people use katakana to emphasise 今夜のコンサートメッチャ楽しみしているsuch as in the title of this random video メッチャすごいフィギュア見つけた!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmmJzNu7cyI
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Japanese quotation marks

Japanese generally doesn't have bolding or italics or u̲n̲d̲e̲r̲l̲i̲n̲i̲n̲g̲, just as typographic conventions. There is the 傍点【ぼうてん】, the dots put above (for horizontal text) or to the right (for ...
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