23

Since this is a formal statement, it's better to keep 私の. But people can understand the sentence without it because they know it's your profile. What's worse about your sentence is that your sentence has a number of bad word choices and grammatical errors. 生むています is always ungrammatical. The te-form of 生む is 生んで. There is a subject-predicate mismatch. ...


15

I think it's definition #8 of the 助動詞(auxiliary verb) "た" in デジタル大辞泉: 8 (「…たらどうか」「…たらいかがでしょうか」などの形で)助言したり提案したり勧誘したりする場合に用いられる。「この件は継続審議ということにしたらいかがでしょうか」 [補説]... 仮定形「たら」は、多く「ば」を伴わないで「雨が降ったら中止だ」などと使われ、「遅いからもう帰ったら」のように文末に用いられて8の意を表す。 たら is its 仮定形(hypothetical form). When used at the end of a sentence it indicates a suggestion, recommendation or advice, ...


10

As for your last question, please read this question and answer first: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? This question is about two-kanji compounds (熟語 in the narrow sense), but the answer there is basically true for many cases involving four kanji or more. In fact, most of the "四字熟語" you encounter, like 火力発電 or 愛国精神, are established set phrases, ...


7

It doesn't sounds to me like there would be an implied 何 there. I think it means just literally "well then, do you want to become [one]?" Would be easier to say for sure with some context about the conversation, i.e. were they talking about becoming something specific before that.


7

「美{うつく}しい伝統{でんとう}の国柄{くにがら}を明日{あす}の日本{にっぽん}へ」 That is not a sentence. It is a perfectly-formed phrase for a title, headline or motto, but without a verb at the end, I would not call it a sentence. So, what is the verb that is left unsaid? It would be the one that logically fits below (in English): "to (verb) our beautiful national characteristics into/...


6

Are there any obvious tricks I'm missing that help me keep track of who is speaking and who they are speaking about? Thanks. ・Pronouns This one's pretty obvious. What pronouns do each character tend to refer to themselves with? What pronouns do they tend to use to refer to certain other characters? ・Gender indicators Besides pronouns, there may be other ...


6

To me it reads as though いや、知っていて is the author changing his mind mid-sentence: "Even without knowing his daughter's feelings.. no, even knowing them... this is a Hiroshi who has no problem saying something like that."


6

You are close. The omitted phrase is その知識が生かせるのではないか, where か is the question marking particle you must know well. It says "Can't I make use of the knowledge? (I can!)" rather than saying "I can't make use of the knowledge". Similarly, 刺さるのでは in that context means 刺さるのではない(だろう)か, meaning "I wonder if it pricks".


6

心配いりません is the same as 心配はいりません (literally "worry is not needed"), but は is omitted. Here 心配 is a simple noun meaning "worry" or "anxiety". Suru-verbs are essentially nouns followed by する ("to do"), so you can treat words like 心配, 運転 ("driving"), 勉強 ("studying") also as simple nouns. Since 心配いりません is something people say very often, you can safely omit は ...


6

The correct term is rhetorical question, and yes, in this case it is a rhetorical question. Also there is no "why" in the Japanese sentence. Japanese people often use か like that, especially to confirm what has already been said, for example: A: 俺だ! = It's me! B: お前か... = So it's you (huh)...


5

First, it would be more natural to assume that it is B who says the second line. Call it a native speaker's gut feeling; I just could not imagine A saying it. It sounds to me like a reply to A's line. 「どうしても・・・ね」 here would mean: 「どうしても賛成{さんせい}できないんだよね」 ("I can't [agree to it/approve of it] for the life of me.") You will encounter 「どうしても」 again and ...


5

Both って and と are quotative particles and are grammatically interchangeable. While the former is colloquial and casual, the latter is not particularly formal nor casual (and it's thus "safer" while you're a learner). In your first example, 言ってた is omitted because it can be inferred from the context. This omission can happen regardless of whether it's ...


5

You could have said 僕は春の雪です instead, although this is colloquial and some teacher might still want to correct it, depending on their stance or your level of Japanese. This type of sentence is sometimes referred to as うなぎ文 ("eel sentence"). Are possessive particles implied in a conversation? Overall syntax of this sentence 僕のは is wrong because 僕の refers to ...


4

What makes something 四字熟語 is not very easy to define. What you are talking really comes down to a concept known as idiomaticity in Linguistics. Having that said, 四字熟語 are generally words used as idioms (i.e. 慣用句). A 慣用句 is an expression that often utilizes more than one unrelated words to mean something completely different. For example, 画竜点睛 means ...


4

It's not really that で is omitted, but うち is diverted to something like "conjunction" or "preposition" in English. It can lead a full sentence ("sentence (終止形) + うち") or a noun phrase ("NP + のうち") to make an adverbial clause (sentence adverb) that means "in the course of; within". Sometimes, you can reword ...


4

This has nothing to do with Kansai. 「フォークみたいの」 means 「フォークみたいなもの」= "fork-like thing". The 「の」 is not being used instead of 「を」. Rather, 「を」 is being omitted because of the informality of the speech. You can correctly say 「フォークみたいのを貸してください」 if you want to. You cannot omit the 「の」 because if you do, 「フォークみたい」 cannot be nominalized.


4

"Anyway, I presume it's about a boy transferring to the school and the teacher introduces him to the class while the main character takes her assigned seat. In other words, I think 席に着くよう指示した is being done by the main character, as the transfer student is getting introduced." No, that is being done by the teacher. The "real" verb in that phrase is 「[指示]{しじ}...


4

This 何も here (which I will call the "protestive 何も") should be differentiated from the 何も meaning "(not) any". First, the pitch accents are different (at least in standard Japanese): なにも{HLL} ("protestive") vs なにも{LHH} ("(not) any") Second, the protestive 何も always appears at the beginning of a clause, whereas the (not-...


4

例の文章は省略された言い回しのようなものですけれども、強調されている言葉は「やさしい」です。そして、「やさしい」について考えますと、「誰にとってやさしいのか、何にとってやさしいのか」という疑問が自然に頭の中に浮かんできます。この観点から見ますと、「人に​[作]{●}[ら]{●}[れ]{●}[た]{●}​」のではなく、「何々​[の]{●}[た]{●}[め]{●}[に]{●}​」でもなく、「何々に​[と]{●}[っ]{●}[て]{●}(やさしい)​」や「何々に​[対]{●}[し]{●}[て]{●}​(やさしい)」というほうが正しい解釈でしょう。


4

You are parsing it incorrectly. 「出直{でなお}して・き・な」 = 「出直す」+「くる」+「な」 「な」 here is a sentence-ending particle that functions as an informal imperative-softener. Thus, 「きな」 means virtually the same thing as 「来{き}なさい」 "Come again after reading the picture book, will you?"


3

「Verb in Dictionary Form - u + ya」 makes the colloquial hypothetical form of the verb, which in the formal form, would be: 「Verb in Dictionary Form - u + eba 」 Thus, 「出{だ}しゃ」 is the colloquial form of 「出せば」. 「おれが本気をだしゃあ」, therefore, means "if I went all-out" with the whole main clause describing the result left unsaid. What is left unsaid would be ...


3

出しゃあ is a contraction of 出せば. Compare すれば → すりゃ, 書けば → 書きゃ, 死ねば → 死にゃ, ..., that is //eba// → //ʲa//. The extra あ could be seen as a lengthening to compensate for the lost mora. (See also 手えふった - what is the "え” here?) Of course it means something like おれが本気をだせば... If I were to get serious... P.S. 出しては would usually contract to 出しちゃ


3

たいていの人は、ぱっと見てこれは[倒置]{とうち}(inversion, anastrophe)だと認識すると思います。 「やさしいかわ ひとに ちきゅうに」 (倒置が起こっている) ← 「ひとに、ちきゅうに、やさしいかわ」(もとの語順) 「人にも地球にも優しい革」、「人間にも環境にも優しい革」という意味です。 「~に優しい」は、"to be kind to (someone)" という意味です。 ですから、「どの言葉がなくなったのですか」への答えとしては、語順が変わっただけで、どの言葉もなくなっていない、ということになると思います。


3

The ては is short for 「~てはどう(ですか)?」, "How about doing ~~?", "Why don't you ~~? ~を買っては? = ~を買ってはどう(ですか)? ≒ ~を買ったら? = ~を買ったらどう(ですか)? The ては in ~~てはどうですか literally means "If~~" (≒~たら). (ては = the conjunctive particle て + the binding particle は). So ~てはどうですか literally means "How is it, if you do~~?" --> "How about doing~~?" It's definition #6 on goo辞書. 靴(を)...


3

Translating loosely: Matsusaka steak for me? Dear, don't bother about me. Don't bother shopping for me. Don't bother with Matsusaka beef. おかあさん literally means mother, but oftentimes you'll hear husbands (especially older ones) calling their wives おかあさん. To answer your questions: Yes 私はステーキなんていいから means something like "I don't need things such as ...


3

The modern "use ALL the particles" written style is not the Ideal form from which particles are dropped, but an artificially hypercorrected form from a comment by Matt Surely languages change over time. Using all the particles is the current correct usage. English orthography was at one time far less fixed than it is now, but that does not make modern ...


3

A verb + a postpositional particle "たら" is used when you suggest something.


3

The sentence in question is a "partial" sentence in which the main verb is omitted. Similar things happen very often in English, too: よく来たの? Did [you] come (here) often? うん、お父さんがまだ生きてる頃はね... Yeah, when Dad was still alive ([I] used to come here)... (The subject may be "she" or someone else instead of "you/I".) The "full&...


2

The "のでは" here implies it's one's (humble) opinion or suspicion. One can also say "その知識が生かせるかと思い". I presume this usage is related to "のではない".


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