6

What you're seeing isn't any kind of "dialect spelling" or "pronunciation spelling", but rather the historical spelling. Historical spellings are the kana spellings from before the spelling reforms of the late 1800s up through the mid-1900s. These older spellings often reflect the etymologies (word roots) of the terms. For more about ...


6

As a native Kansai-an I have to point out: the natural way to say it is: (a) 火遊びしたら危ないで! (b) 火遊びしたらアカンで! It'd be odd to say "しちゃあかんで" as you don't say しちゃ in Kansai dialect. ”してもうたら” has a slightly different meaning and shouldn't be used in this case. "してもうたら" is used to describe the consequence of an action, e.g. 火遊びしてもうたらもう許してもらえへんで ...


4

っちゅう is a rather common colloquial contraction of っていう = という, so you may simply read it as うちらに確実に勝てるっていうのか!!


3

My grandma, who was born in Taiwan around the 1930s, speaks Japanese as her first language. Apparently she says that although the language hasn’t changed much, there has been many new colloquial words introduced which she doesn’t understand. But still, it’s probably just like talking to any Japanese grandmas. As to accents, I don’t know.


3

You are correct in your assumption, it is used like 「の」 in standard dialect. And like 「の」, it can be use in questions and answers. Q: 何ばしよっと? → 何をしてるの? A: ご飯作っとーと。 → ご飯作っているの。 Just be careful not to confuse it with the 「とー」 in the middle, which means 「ている」. You can find plenty of info in Japanese (like here or here) on the basics of Hakata dialect. which as ...


3

The たれ is a contracted pronunciation of てやれ, which consists of the て-form + やれ. So [止]{と}めたれ is a contracted pronunciation of [止]{と}めてやれ. As you can see in these threads: ておく → とく in other contexts; similar 2-kana to 1-kana shortcuts? What is this colloquial / dialect form? 〜たるけんね How is たる being used here? ~てやる can contract to ~たる. So can its imperative ...


2

Resources I looked on the following two websites that provided an overview of some Kumamoto dialect vocabulary and searched for the construction in your sentence. Narit (Ctrl+F とっと) Kumamoto Kokufu (Ctrl+F トット) Meaning of 「とっと」 The definition of とっと and some of the sentences and their standard Japanese (標準語{ひょうじゅんご}) equivalents I found on the sites: ...


2

がや should be part of Nagoya dialect and is an ending particle used to describe a surprise or claim. Thanks to the comment, So, I reckon しとーば should be a 名古屋弁{なごやべん}. this doesn't seem to be correct. However, there does seem to be a similar variant used in Kumamoto dialect ばい as well as in Gunma dialect ばい. I guess it means しているので (Kumamoto) or してばかり(Gunma)...


2

This だって is a word recognized by dictionaries. It is a part of the Standard Japanese vocabulary and safely understood in casual conversation without showing peculiar color, if not everyone from every region uses it spontaneously.


1

合拗音の直音化 was complete in the early 19th century in Edo. 合拗音 was more or less preserved until the late 19th century in many western dialects, and it was preserved until the 20th century in a few western dialects. Probably there are no dialects where the distinction is still widely preserved today. 日本語における合拗音の消失 江戸語では十九世紀初めにはすでに直音化していたのに対して,...


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