4

This is 三河弁{みかわべん}, a dialect used in parts of 愛知県{あいちけん}. Conjugating with りん is a sort of "soft" imperative, suggestive rather than commanding. As for your sentences, the parts with the りん therefore translate to the following: You (亜也) are good at English, so you should master it completely. (It is good to) hold the hand rail while going up. ...


3

It's definitely dialectal, but according to this page, it's not specific to 茨城. To me, this type of sentence-end だか is stereotypical いなか言葉 that is associated with no particular region in Japan. (That is not to say だか is an imaginary thing.)


3

It mostly corresponds to う・よう in Tokyo dialect (≒ べし in classical). Summing up the sources below, it means 推量・勧誘・断定. From here (推量) ~だろう / でしょう ⇒ ~べ (男性) 寒いだろう ⇒ 寒いべ 日本人でしょう ⇒ 日本人だべ [意向形] / [辞書形]ぞ ⇒ [辞書形]べ (男性) 飲もう ⇒ 飲むべ 帰ろう ⇒ 帰るべ From 北海道方言#代表的な文末表現 動詞・形容詞+「べ」、名詞+「だべ」 推量および勧誘の助動詞 「遊ぶべ」=「遊ぼう(よ)」、「寒いべ」=「寒いだろうね」、「これだべ」=「これだろう?」 「〜(だ)べさ」(主に女性)、「〜(だ)べや」(...


1

Short answer is no, AFAIK. However, if I may go beyond your restriction of "na-adjectives", things get interesting. For example, daikon だいこん is pronounced as deekon でーこん. Daikon is not an adjective, but you see a similar pattern as sugoi / sugee. BTW, this is not limited to Tokyo-ben. We say Okayama-ben turns "daikon taitoite" だいこんたいといて (...


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