27

No, this phrase isn't cognate with Standard Japanese あした. したっけ literally means what in Standard Japanese そうしたら. The demonstrative そう is omitted because the whole context before is considered to stand in place of it (colloquial omission of this そう is also common in Tokyo). The っけ part shares the same origin with Standard っけ ("(what) again?"), that is ...


19

According to an answer to a similar question on Goo's oshiete site: 「さびしい」 is generally used in two ways (roughly equivalent to how the english "lonely" is used): an emotional state of emptiness, isolation, or a feeling of lacking Examples: 「さびしい正月を迎える」「ふところがさびしい」 quiet and empty of people or sounds Example: 「さびしい山道」 These two meanings are essentially ...


16

Your two examples are incorrect in the “standard” dialect. Some dialects (such as the Gunma dialect and the Saitama dialect) use ん instead of の in a question as in your first example. The second example may also be used in some dialects.


15

They are dialectal forms, but it could be said that three synonymous forms かたつむり, でんでんむし, and まいまい have gained more or less nation-wide recognition today. The situation is somehow similar to that "soda/pop/coke" tripartition in USA. The name of snail has been a signature of Japanese dialectology since the pioneering work 『蝸牛考』 written in 1930 by Kunio ...


14

Sure. Dialects can vary right down to the particles. In Kansai-ben, there is a particle かて which does not appear in standard Japanese. It roughly means 〜ても, でも, さえ etc. In Tohoku-ben, the particle さ is used instead of what in standard Japanese would be に or へ: 東京さ行ぐ, etc. In some Nagano dialects, を is pronounced /wo/, not /o/. In many dialects, including ...


14

This is the result of a well known devoicing rule in Japanese. Devoicing means that there is no vibration of the vocal folds. For example, the difference between [s] and [z] is only that [z] is voiced. The IPA diacritic for devoiced phones is a circle at the bottom of the glyph e.g. [z̥]=[s]. Although there is still much dialectal, idiolectal (the way a ...


14

The ん negative ending is a contraction of sorts of classical negative ending ぬ, precursor to modern ない. It's still pretty common. As illustration of this, the Microsoft IME gives 食べん as a valid conversion option after typing in taben, or 飲まん for noman. Note that する with the negative ん is not しん, but instead せん, as again the negative ん is from classical ぬ, ...


13

Those are good examples of what my favorite author [筒井康隆]{つついやすたか} has named 「[全国共通]{ぜんこくきょうつう}いなか[言葉]{ことば}」, which I would translate to "All-Japan Standard Provincial Dialect". It is an imaginary dialect, instead of an existing dialect, that is used in stories. Believe it or not, it is most often used in children's stories. (Which is why I rarely ...


13

Yes, it must be, because it appears (or has appeared) in various inflected forms such as あかへん. There are multiple theories about where exactly it comes from, but according to 日本国語大辞典 it's derived from らち(埒)があかぬ: 「らち(埒)があかぬ」の上を略した表現「あかぬ」の変化した語 Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (1975) is slightly dated but has some interesting discussion on page 385, ...


12

My guess is that it's a typo of either しやした or しました. At first glance, た looks pretty hard to mistype as ま, but on second thought, it's likely to happen on mobile phones. Considering that most Japanese mobile phones have keypads like: あかさ たなは まやら it's quite easy to mistype た, ま and や, which are arranged next to each other. しやした can be a ...


12

As you probably already read in the question on dialects, Yakuzas are often pictured speaking Hiroshima-ben on TV. According to Japanese friends, this has probably as much to do with the fact that Hiroshima-ben naturally sounds quite hard to the ear (whereas soft-spoken Kyoto-ben is the typical dialect choice for cute, feminine characters) as any real-world ...


12

It really all depends on how you define preservation, and whether you consider the Ryukyuan languages (such as Okinawan) separate languages or dialects of Japanese, since ゑ and ゐ are used in some Ryukyuan spelling systems (other systems use other conventions such as writing these sounds as うぇ and うぃ). There are one or two problems with considering that as a ...


12

Actually, you've already got the right answer! The verb in question is する, and one of its negative stems (未然形) is せ〜, as in せず, せぬ, and as you've just discovered, せん. The other negative stem of する is the well-known し〜. Note that these are not interchangeable: **せない is ungrammatical, as is **しず. The only verbs that have this extra negative stem are する and ...


12

「やな」 is a Kansai affirmative sentence-ender used just like 「だな」 in Kanto. 「[久]{ひさ}しぶりやな。」 = "Long time no see, yeah?" or just "Long time no see!" 「いい[感]{かん}じやなぁ。」 = "That's cool.", "That's pretty good.", etc. Real Kansai people might use ええ, not いい for the second phrase, though.


12

It's widely used in Kanto and Tohoku regions to a varying degree. Stereotyped Tohoku dialect uses っぺ instead of べ(ー), though. 東京方言 伝統的な関東方言・東北方言では意思・同意・推量の語尾は「べ(え)」であり、「行くべ」や「これだべ」「これだんべ」「これだっぺ」などと言うが、東京方言では「行こう」や「これだろ(う)」と言う。「う・よう」の使用が広まる以前は江戸でも「べ(え)」を多用し、当時上方の人間から「関東べい」と呼ばれていた。


11

Mark Hosang already gave a good answer, so I'll only try to add more detail to it, and maybe generalize the dialect division some more. It's hard to answer "how many dialects are commonly used", for two reasons: Dialects are hard to count - you can subdivide dialects (e.g. Kyoto-ben, Osaka-ben, Kobe-ben) or join them into bigger groups (Kansai-ben). Some ...


11

Here in all of your examples, it's a contraction of 飲んでいき~ (飲んで行きい) in regional dialect mainly used in the Kansai area, meaning 飲んでいけ (飲んで + subsidiary verb 行け), or 飲んでいって(ちょうだい), literally "(Please) Drink and go." This colloquial contraction (dropping い in the subsidiary verb 行く) is also seen in Standard Japanese: 飲んでいく → 飲んでく 走っていこう。 → 走ってこう。 / ...


10

This actually most likely Oosaka-ben's variation of 「や」as「よ」, becoming something like: なんか買ってくれよ! The usage is explained in more detail here: http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%82%84?dictCode=OSAKA (Japanese) EDIT The original quote from the just in case site downtime happens: 「ある」が転じた「やる」の命令形「やれ」の略。言葉の終わりに付けることで、命令敬語や連用形命令語などをやわらげる働きがある。「よ」...


10

Was しもうた ever a part of the standard japanese dialect? Do 昔話 borrow from the other current dialects to create their atmosphere or do they generally only use older Japanese forms? It's hard to generalize about the entire genre, of course, but I think a combination of all of your theories is true. Modern "mukashibanashi" (as opposed to period novels 時代小説 and ...


10

Like @himself noted, it does mean 葉人をつかまえたんだな. While some dialects do have this change, more importantly it's used to characterise the speaker as a stereotypical wise old male (usually in anime or otherwise in a fiction).


10

In some dialects spoken in the western part of Japan, you can elongate the last vowel of the masu-stem to make an imperative form: 歩きい。 (dialect) = 歩け。 Walk. 見い。 (dialect) = 見ろ。 Watch. [待ちい]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [待て]{HL}。 Wait. [食べえ]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [食べろ]{LHL}。 Eat. (From my personal experience, I feel this is mainly used in Chugoku/Shikoku ...


10

There are at least three types of omission of く, which should be distinguished. The "traditional western" euphoric change is called ウ音便 and is described in this question, this one and a chart in this page. ku becomes (y)u, etc. This sounds old-fashioned and elegant. While this is commonly heard in samurai dramas, only a few courteous elder people use this ...


9

I did a search on this and found the following: 昔、TBSの番組「ザ・ベスト10」で久米宏が なに気に 「〜かしら」と言ったのを見て初めは かなり衝撃でしたが アナウンサーの業界では以外と使われている様です。 あと学者や解説者など、有識者や育ちのいい人が 今でも比較的違和感なく使っていますね。 Loose translation: "Back in the days, Kume Hiroshi used it quite frequently in the show "The Best 10". While it may come as a shock to those who first experience it, it's ...


9

しとったんや means しておったのだ → していたのだ, "was doing", in colloquial Kansai-ben.


9

The only 「じゃけぇ」 that I am familiar with is that used in Hiroshima dialect meaning 「だから」 and it is very often used at the ends of sentences. When used at the end of a sentence, it just means "alright?" in the sense of "you hear?". This is the exact same with 「じゃけぇ」 in Hiroshima dialect and 「だから」 in Standard Japanese. Whether or not 「じゃけぇ」 is used in other ...


9

At least Okinawan has nonstandard kana to precisely represent their sounds. For example, Okinawan has two types of う ([u] and [ʔu]), whose difference is important for the local people to distinguish their native words. Does Okinawan have syllables Japanese doesn't? Okinawan scripts Ainu also has special katakana, although Ainu may not be Japonic. ...


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