27

No, this phrase isn't cognate with Standard Japanese あした. したっけ literally means what in Standard Japanese そうしたら. The demonstrative そう is omitted because the whole context before is considered to stand in place of it (colloquial omission of this そう is also common in Tokyo). The っけ part shares the same origin with Standard っけ ("(what) again?"), that is ...


15

The ん negative ending is a contraction of sorts of classical negative ending ぬ, precursor to modern ない. It's still pretty common. As illustration of this, the Microsoft IME gives 食べん as a valid conversion option after typing in taben, or 飲まん for noman. Note that する with the negative ん is not しん, but instead せん, as again the negative ん is from classical ぬ, ...


15

They are dialectal forms, but it could be said that three synonymous forms かたつむり, でんでんむし, and まいまい have gained more or less nation-wide recognition today. The situation is somehow similar to that "soda/pop/coke" tripartition in USA. The name of snail has been a signature of Japanese dialectology since the pioneering work 『蝸牛考』 written in 1930 by Kunio ...


14

This is the result of a well known devoicing rule in Japanese. Devoicing means that there is no vibration of the vocal folds. For example, the difference between [s] and [z] is only that [z] is voiced. The IPA diacritic for devoiced phones is a circle at the bottom of the glyph e.g. [z̥]=[s]. Although there is still much dialectal, idiolectal (the way a ...


13

Those are good examples of what my favorite author [筒井康隆]{つついやすたか} has named 「[全国共通]{ぜんこくきょうつう}いなか[言葉]{ことば}」, which I would translate to "All-Japan Standard Provincial Dialect". It is an imaginary dialect, instead of an existing dialect, that is used in stories. Believe it or not, it is most often used in children's stories. (Which is why I rarely ...


13

Yes, it must be, because it appears (or has appeared) in various inflected forms such as あかへん. There are multiple theories about where exactly it comes from, but according to 日本国語大辞典 it's derived from らち(埒)があかぬ: 「らち(埒)があかぬ」の上を略した表現「あかぬ」の変化した語 Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (1975) is slightly dated but has some interesting discussion on page 385, ...


12

Actually, you've already got the right answer! The verb in question is する, and one of its negative stems (未然形) is せ〜, as in せず, せぬ, and as you've just discovered, せん. The other negative stem of する is the well-known し〜. Note that these are not interchangeable: **せない is ungrammatical, as is **しず. The only verbs that have this extra negative stem are する and ...


12

「やな」 is a Kansai affirmative sentence-ender used just like 「だな」 in Kanto. 「[久]{ひさ}しぶりやな。」 = "Long time no see, yeah?" or just "Long time no see!" 「いい[感]{かん}じやなぁ。」 = "That's cool.", "That's pretty good.", etc. Real Kansai people might use ええ, not いい for the second phrase, though.


12

It's widely used in Kanto and Tohoku regions to a varying degree. Stereotyped Tohoku dialect uses っぺ instead of べ(ー), though. 東京方言 伝統的な関東方言・東北方言では意思・同意・推量の語尾は「べ(え)」であり、「行くべ」や「これだべ」「これだんべ」「これだっぺ」などと言うが、東京方言では「行こう」や「これだろ(う)」と言う。「う・よう」の使用が広まる以前は江戸でも「べ(え)」を多用し、当時上方の人間から「関東べい」と呼ばれていた。


11

Was しもうた ever a part of the standard japanese dialect? Do 昔話 borrow from the other current dialects to create their atmosphere or do they generally only use older Japanese forms? It's hard to generalize about the entire genre, of course, but I think a combination of all of your theories is true. Modern "mukashibanashi" (as opposed to period novels 時代小説 and ...


11

Like @himself noted, it does mean 葉人をつかまえたんだな. While some dialects do have this change, more importantly it's used to characterise the speaker as a stereotypical wise old male (usually in anime or otherwise in a fiction).


11

Here in all of your examples, it's a contraction of 飲んでいき~ (飲んで行きい) in regional dialect mainly used in the Kansai area, meaning 飲んでいけ (飲んで + subsidiary verb 行け), or 飲んでいって(ちょうだい), literally "(Please) Drink and go." This colloquial contraction (dropping い in the subsidiary verb 行く) is also seen in Standard Japanese: 飲んでいく → 飲んでく 走っていこう。 → 走ってこう。 / ...


10

In some dialects spoken in the western part of Japan, you can elongate the last vowel of the masu-stem to make an imperative form: 歩きい。 (dialect) = 歩け。 Walk. 見い。 (dialect) = 見ろ。 Watch. [待ちい]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [待て]{HL}。 Wait. [食べえ]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [食べろ]{LHL}。 Eat. (From my personal experience, I feel this is mainly used in Chugoku/Shikoku ...


10

There are at least three types of omission of く, which should be distinguished. The "traditional western" euphoric change is called ウ音便 and is described in this question, this one and a chart in this page. ku becomes (y)u, etc. This sounds old-fashioned and elegant. While this is commonly heard in samurai dramas, only a few courteous elder people use this ...


9

しとったんや means しておったのだ → していたのだ, "was doing", in colloquial Kansai-ben.


9

The only 「じゃけぇ」 that I am familiar with is that used in Hiroshima dialect meaning 「だから」 and it is very often used at the ends of sentences. When used at the end of a sentence, it just means "alright?" in the sense of "you hear?". This is the exact same with 「じゃけぇ」 in Hiroshima dialect and 「だから」 in Standard Japanese. Whether or not 「じゃけぇ」 is used in other ...


9

At least Okinawan has nonstandard kana to precisely represent their sounds. For example, Okinawan has two types of う ([u] and [ʔu]), whose difference is important for the local people to distinguish their native words. Does Okinawan have syllables Japanese doesn't? Okinawan scripts Ainu also has special katakana, although Ainu may not be Japonic. ...


9

That statement basically only applies for おる as a simple existence verb. Non-humble おる is very common in Kansai. As a subsidiary verb, various forms including とる/ちょる/よる are commonly used instead of standard (~て)いる, but there are considerable regional variations even inside Kansai. See this discussion. 太郎はおる。 There is Taro. / Taro is here. (≒太郎はいる) ...


8

I feel that speaking a foreign language in an accent other than the 'standard' one is kind of like playing the violin: it sounds really awful from a beginner, but from someone skilled it can sound very nice. I myself lived for two years in the Kanto area and learned to speak 'standard' Japanese. After that I spent a year in Kyoto and though I learned to ...


8

I agree with Chocolate: it is not expected, regardless of whether the traveler is a native speaker of Japanese or not. And as a result of doing something unexpected, some people may interpret it as making fun of the local accent, because it seems to be the most plausible explanation why anyone from another area would imitate (probably very poorly) the local ...


8

Other samples from this character in your manga would be helpful to confirm this, but my guess is that せん is equivalent to しない (and possibly derived from せぬ, see Zhen Lin's comment below). Then, 苦労せん means something like "don't worry" or "don't fret". This is really part of the group of dialects from 'Western Japan'. In particular, [九州弁]{きゅうしゅうべん} uses せんで ...


8

As far as I know, there is no difference, because Japanese is mainly used as a language to talk to people in Japan which is right close by, and to enjoy media and products from Japan. Japanese is still widely studied in Korea for the same reasons. Japanese textbooks in Taiwan seem to demonstrate an eagerness for fluency and avoiding confusion in business ...


8

「おやすも」 is used only by some residents of the region named インターネット. It is not used in Tokyo or Nagoya, I promise.


8

I think うち is a neutral and common feminine first-person pronoun, at least in part of Kansai region. There, people who use うち use it because everyone else uses it. As long as it is used with fluent Kansai-ben in an informal setting, I would feel nothing special about うち. Wikipedia says うち is used also by male people in certain regions in Kyushu, but I have ...


8

Yes, it means すみっこ. They say it's 静岡{しずおか} dialect. Source 1・Source 2


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible