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16

I'm not sure if this is within the scope of your question, but the following is about highly stereotyped traits of "gaijin-speech" found in manga and net forums. They are explained in pages like this, this and this. Please note that they do not reflect how foreigners speak Japanese in reality. Unsurprisingly, some of them are rude or displeasing especially ...


15

During the Edo period, villages traditionally had 10 communal activities: 冠 - 成人式 - coming of age ceremony 婚 - marriage 建築 - helping with building/repairing 病気 - helping when sick 水害 - helping during flooding/water damage 旅行 - travel 出産 - giving birth 年忌 - death anniversaries 葬式 - funeral service 火事 - fire fighting However, when ...


11

I assume you're specifically talking about kanji/hanzi glyphs. (Hiragana are obviously more cursive.) Basically the overall appearances of typical Chinese hanzi and Japanese kanji fonts are not significantly different in terms of line width, roundness, etc., just as English "A", French "A" and German "A" are rendered the same. If you compare recent ...


7

Shifting from polite speech to casual speech is usually a gradual and implicit process when a mature adult makes friends with someone. Depending on the situation, it may take months or even years to switch. Actually I often find myself using some polite sentences when I chat with people who have been my close friends more than 10 years. Here are some random ...


5

Two things that I notice, at least in caricatures of non-Japanese speakers speaking Japanese, are mistakes in the vowel sounds and in the cadence of words. Vowel sounds The Japanese vowel sounds do roughly correspond to some of the sounds in English, but they take a while to get right. As an extreme example, consider the pronunciation of the American ...


5

one stereotype I see on Japanese TV, and from my students' jokes, is that Japanese people believe that foreigners will inevitably put the stresses on the wrong syllables while speaking Japanese. The exaggerated stereotype is usually a comical element of the stereotyped foreigner, and the syllables they stress are, as a result, usually very comically over-...


5

I basically agree with @naruto's answer - the main reason is that if a Japanese designer chose a relatively unique Japanese font for design aesthetics, it is normally a challenge to get a matching Chinese font. If Simplified Chinese is used as the Chinese text, this then becomes extremely challenging. For the photo in the question, to match the "antique" ...


4

I will say like 申し訳ないけど、~なので受け取れないんです。 I think you should explain the reason why you reject the gift. For example, if I am presented a whole cake and reject it, I will say like 申し訳ないけど、ダイエット中なので受け取れないんです。


4

Role focused class structure is not a common concept used to describe modern Japan. Neither really income-based, at least from maybe the 50s up to the 90s (see 一億総中流). However, recently the word 格差社会 picked up, and there is a lot more talk about 貧困層 (the poor), 富裕層 (the rich) and 格差の固定化 (decreasing social mobility). I guess income-based classes are starting ...


3

Honorifics are used heavily in Japan. However one culture difference between Japan and South Korea is that age, though important in Japan, is nowhere nearly as much so as in South Korea. So for example, whereas in S. Korea, if two friends are at least one year apart in age, they will refer to each other as younger/older siblings, even if they're not ...


3

I don't see any reason these words (or combination of letters) should be censored in Japanese language. To my full imagination, there are no slang, rhyme, abbreviation or metaphor that makes these phrases offensive. In an unofficial wiki of the game, they list some of the words/phrases that are sensored in the in-game chat. The writer seems to agree with us;...


3

Unsurprisingly, a sudden switch to polite speech or keigo usually means a psychological distance, anger or a serious mood. However, if a couple uses keigo on a daily basis, that's another story. Traditionally, the concept of gender role was much more prevailing than today in Japan, and it was not uncommon for a wife to use keigo to her husband. In Sazae-san,...


3

Social (hierarchical) class, in general terms, is called 階層. The occupation-based classification (the "role class" you called) is in particular called 階級. Thus, 上流階級 upper class 中産階級/中流階級 middle class 労働者階級 working class And the income-based classes are referred to as -層 (階層 itself is not used as part of words). 富裕層 the rich (wealthy class) 中間層 middle(-...


2

The specific combination 冥府魔道 is almost certainly a coinage of the 子連れ狼's scriptwriter, 小池一夫. He said it himself on Twitter. It can be broken down to two words. 冥府 Literally means "dead man's land" or what you call underworld or netherworld. It is a general term in the Chinese folklore and has different imaginations between Daoist and Buddhist mythologies. ...


2

At least in Japanese, 掛軸(かけじく) is a type of 掛物(かけもの). 掛軸 only refers to hanging scrolls. Note the kanji 軸 ("axis/shaft"), which refers to scrolls in this context. 掛物 is much less common, but it is broadly used to refer to paintings and calligraphic works​ that are intended to be hung on a wall. The kanji 物 is just "thing(s)" or "one(s)". They include 掛軸, ...


2

Basically this 圧 is a figurative and humorous expression that refers to one's "energy" or "aura". The implication of 圧が強い depends on the context. If it's negative, it implies "oppressing", "noisy and annoying", "scary", "over-confident and rude", etc. If it's neutral or positive, it implies "eager", "looks full of confidence", "has strong presence", etc. ...


2

Probably due to Kuroshio's strong current, they improve transportation of heat and things. The lyricist wanted to encourage troops mentioning 黒潮. My interpretation is the following : 寄せる黒潮 何と見る The Kuroshio is forthcoming, how do you feel about that?(Why don't you get stoked!?) It sounds like a typical phrase of rock concert like Metallica. Possibly 陸軍{...


2

I wanted to know if there are similar common games in Japanese There are several of such games in Japanese. [言葉遊び]{ことばあそ}, literally "word play", might be the word you are looking for. Notice that this is connected exactly to "word play" in English, if you read the article in another language. In this article you can see many representative games, among ...


1

In the context of your other post, I think that it's not a peculiarly Japanese response. I would think of it in that context as an expression of the feeling "there's nothing I can do about it". However, I also think that in Japanese culture, it's more common than in English-speaking culture to express feelings of "there's nothing I/we/you/anyone can do ...


1

It's usually seen as "mochi-pounding rabbits" -> 月の兎 (https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%9C%88%E3%81%AE%E5%85%8E)


1

黒潮 is a familiar term to Japanese people (elementary school students learn it at school), and there was a warship called 黒潮 and a kisha club called 黒潮会. It obviously has an image of "(warm,) fast and strong", but beyond this, I don't think there is an episode or implication widely shared among Japanese people. 潮【うしお】 is a word sometimes used in poetry to ...


1

The Wikipedia page has examples of tons of similar games. Then there are なぞなぞ, that is riddles, which play with the meanings of the words. Here's one list, although you can basically find an unlimited supply on google. I guess something like 文字パズル or possibly 単語パズル could be closer to what you're referring to. I'm not aware of any formal term for a game like ...


1

~の代わり【かわり】に means "in place of ~" of "instead of ~". For example you can say 彼の代わりに謝る. Another expression is ~の代理として ("on behalf of ~"), but this is a fairly stiff expression used, for example, when you make a formal speech as proxy for someone.


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