9

If you mean you use those words in cooking, we rather say like: にんにく一玉【ひとたま】 or 一房【ひとふさ】: "a ball/bunch of garlic" = "a garlic bulb" にんにく一片【ひとかけ】: "a chip of garlic" = "a garlic clove" In your case, "2 garlic cloves" will be にんにく二片【ふたかけ】. Or if you refer to "a garlic bulb" in the context of ...


8

Nページ can mean "N page(s)" referring to the number of pages (eg 300ページの本 = a 300-page book). However, Nページ can also mean "page N", the page marked with that number. On the other hand, Nページ目 means "N-th page", and it's not necessarily the same as Nページ without 目. For example, the following two expressions may refer to the same page:...


5

As you noted, 6枚 should be read as ろくまい, and 8枚 should be read as はちまい. Similarly, 16枚 should be read as じゅうろくまい, and 18枚 should be read as じゅうはちまい. I have no idea why your textbook would render these as じゅうろっまい and じゅうはっまい. Neither pronunciation is correct -- these aren't even dialectal variants, so far as I'm aware; they're just wrong. PS: The larger ...


5

You can think of it like ◯-ban ↔ no. ◯ ◯-banme ↔ ◯st,nd,rd,th so sanbanme no seki = the third seat hachiban no seki = seat no. 8 There are a few related questions, but they usually use hiragana and kanji: What is the correct way of saying "third" in different contexts? 「二番」 vs. 「二番目」 confusion Why is this [二番目]{に・ばん・め} counter used for a ...


4

It can be only pronounced よんダメージ. ダメージ triggers no sound change. You effectively just put it after plain numerals (いち, に, さん, よん, ご, ろく, なな, はち, きゅう, じゅう...). よっつダメージ is impossible unless you try to say like "give it four valid hits". When ダメージ means damage value, we only use itself as a pseudo-counter or without counters, such as よんのダメージ, ダメージよん.


4

Use the generic counter 個. 数字が12個あります。 If the count is limited, you can also use ひとつ, ふたつ, みっつ and so on.


4

年齢 is not a counter. It corresponds to the concept of “age”. I believe you are sometimes asked to fill in your age, alongside your name, in certain forms. You are asked to fill in your 年齢. So (*) 私は22年齢 is incorrect. You can say 私の年齢は22歳です, although it sounds a bit redundant. [歳]{とし} or [年]{とし} is also used for one's age. 年齢 sounds more formal. I wouldn’t ...


4

You could say ひと[吠]{ほ}え and ふた吠え in the case of a dog’s barking. 吠え is a noun form of the verb 吠える (“to bark”). I cannot think of any realistic scenario where I would keep counting a dog’s barks beyond two, or maybe three, using this counter, though. I would most likely say: 犬が3回吠えた。 More generally, if the sounds come from an animal, you could use [声]{こえ}. ...


3

This が is a plain subject marker, and it's not interchangeable with の. This 〇が1人 is a contracted version of 〇が1人いる. いる has been omitted because it's redundant when counting things. In English, you count sheep like "One sheep, two sheep" (but not "There is one sheep, there are two sheep", which is too cumbersome). In Japanese, we say "...


3

Yes this is a valid expression. This 回 is a simple noun that means "episode (of a TV program)", "inning (of baseball)", "round (of an experiment, competition, etc.)", "show (of a movie/play/etc played at a theater on a day)" and such. It's typically modified by 最初の, 次の, 前の, 新しい and 最後の. 最終回 is a common phrase that ...


3

According to 数え方単位辞典, you can count it by 一本{いっぽん}、一枚{いちまい}、一流{ひとなが}れ、一旒{いちりゅう}、一棹{ひとさお}. They also explain 旗はポールに掲げられると「本」で数えます。 1本のポールに複数の旗が掲げられた場合は「枚」で数えます。 古くは「流れ」「旒 (ç) 」「棹 (さお) 」などでも数えました。 If several flags on one pole, you can count 『枚』. Usually,『本』for one flag on one pole. I understand 棹{さお} for counting it, but hard to count by the other old format ...


3

As a non-Japanese-teacher, I think neither form is immediately wrong, or I can rather say that it mostly depends on personal preferences (disclaimer: I don't know if JLPT says otherwise :P). Etymologically, the counter 羽【わ】 was は in its older form, obviously cognate with 羽【はね】 "wing". Unlike most counters, this short piece of word was easily ...


3

Apparently 計 is short for 合計 (total, sum) while 全 is for 全部 (all, everything). So 計 should be used with numbers which result from adding something, e.g. 計3万円になります The total will be 30000 yen While 全 is for cases when there is a complete set of something: 全16巻(の漫画) All 16 volumes (of a manga series) In your example sentence, it seems that Matsumoto-san ...


2

If we're talking about 一つ、二つ、三つ、etc... According to jisho.org, "箇" is defined as: Counter for the hito-futa-mi counting system (forming hitotsu, futatsu, mitsu, and misoji, yasoji, etc.) Other forms of this kanji include 個 and 个 as notated on the dictionary entry itself.


2

As your links say, both 二百十日 and 二百二十日 are the names of certain folk calendrical terms (210th and 220th days from 立春). Here, the date counter ~か is used to indicate a day in the calendar. Since there is no serial date bigger than 31 in either Gregorian or Japanese months, thinking about such big dates is usually meaningless. However, those specific two words ...


2

As @rebuuilt notes, ニンニク and にんにく are the same word written in two different syllabaries ("alphabets"). (There also exists a rarely used kanji representation 大蒜.) The most common way to refer to a single clove of garlic is 1片 (or using kanji for the number: 一片) which can be read either ひとかけ hitokake or いっぺん ippen. I think for a bulb of garlic one ...


1

ニンニク (katakana syllabary) and にんにく (hiragana syllabary) are two different but equivalent ways of writing the same thing: garlic. garlic: ニンニク or にんにく garlic clove: ニンニクのひとかけ (based on this website: https://gourmet-note.jp/posts/2607) garlic bulb: ニンニクの球根 or ニンニクの鱗茎 (I think 鱗茎 is a more specific term)


1

I don't believe this distinctions between wago and kango is going to help you with counters. Often you may have a choice how to count things. For example, you can say りんごをふたつください。 You can also say りんごをに個{こ}ください。 which does use the counter 個 used for small objects like apples, eggs, bars of soap, etc. However, not everything can be treated like this. ...


1

Japanese is a topic prominent language and since apple りんご is the topic of the sentence, it should be placed at the start of the sentence. 3個のりんごを食べたいです。and りんご3個を食べたいです。both means the same thing - I want to eat three apples. Whereas, りんごを3個食べたいです means I would like to eat three apples Hope you find this helpful!!


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