29

It's a contraction of 答えれば. More generally, eba contracts to ya: kotaereba → kotaerya  (答えれば → 答えりゃ) okeba → okya   (おけば →  おきゃ) ieba → iya   (言えば →   言や) nakereba → nakerya  (なければ → なけりゃ) (As you can see, the pattern is easier to see and describe when romanized.)


21

誰探してんの is a contracted form of 誰探してるの, which in turn is a contracted form of 誰(を)探しているの ("Who are you looking for?", notice the progressive form). More generally: ている contracts to てる. (See this chart) /r/ + vowel before a /n/ consonant can turn into ん in casual speech. (Do not confuse this ん as explanatory-の.) Examples: わからない。 → わかんない。 wakaranai → wakan'...


16

There is なのです (often contracted to なんです), which fits the bill. Just like you suspect, it is declarative/emphatic. This なんです is unrelated to 何{なん}です, but rather a combination of な (the inflection of the copula だ, if you like), the nominalizer の plus the "politifier" です. It also exists in non-polite form: なのだ・なんだ. It really appears everywhere, e.g. as a ...


14

救われん is made of 救われる and the archaic suffix ん, which came out of む. む・ん had similar roles to よう・おう today; that is to say, 救われん in modern style would be 救われよう or 救われるだろう. It is not related to the ん that comes out of ぬ, which is a strong or dialectal way of stating a negative. Additionally, as chocolate says in the comments, 祈り信じよ means 'Pray and believe', ...


13

You can add focus particles like は or も to verbs, but in order to do so, you have to split the verb into two parts so that the particle has some place to go. We'll split the verb into its continuative stem (called 連用形 in Japanese) and the verb する. For example:   忘れる   → 忘れ+する   忘れる+も = 忘れもする Or:   忘れない   → 忘れ+しない   忘れない+は = 忘れはしない Your example is a ...


13

「言{い}わんこっちゃない」 is the common colloquial form of: 「言わないことではない」 which is a set phrase meaning: "I told you so.", "Didn't I tell you?", "That's why I told you.", etc. 「やれやれ」 just means "Oh dear!" or something along those lines.


12

The dictionary form of: 「てのがどーも」 would be: 「というのがどうも」 In this context, 「どうも」 is used for an ambiguous expression of a (somewhat) negative feeling. It is similar in meaning to 「なんだか」、「ちょっと」 or 「なんとなく」. This 「どうも」 is used quite often in informal speech as it saves us the trouble of selecting adjectives. For a translation, I might use "dunno how to ...


11

First, let me comment on your three examples: です ⇔ であります We discussed です before. According to 大辞林, there are several theories, but we don't know its etymology for sure. This is one of the three theories it lists, though. I've read that でございます may be more likely, but I never read an explanation why, so I won't make that assertion here. じゃない ⇔ ではない ...


11

帝国がってんなら、 It looks like a contracted pronunciation of 帝国がと言うのなら。 ~というのなら → ~ってのなら → ~ってんなら (The particle って can be the colloquial version of という.) I think the sentence literally means: 『帝国が』と言うのなら、 If you mean "The empire (did...)," この旅の間にも on this trip, too 何度か見てきたろ? you've already seen (what it's capable of) several times, haven't you?


10

ニコニコしとれば 悪さは しねえし いつの間にか いねくなっちまうんだ。 This is the same as the following sentence written in the standard Japanese. ニコニコしていれば悪さはしないし、いつの間にかいなくなってしまうんだ。 If you keep smiling, they won't do bad things, and they go away before you notice. The original sentence is not in a particular "dialect", but a typical role language of an old man/lady (aka 老人語). しとる ...


10

It's uttered as a colloquial, casual and exclamatory phrase. It's typically used in response to a situation/stimulation that strikes you suddenly. っ is often added after the stem. 高っ! (Wow,) it's expensive! やば(っ)! (Wow,) this is bad! 痛っ! Ouch! きもちわる(っ)! Gross! In formal settings, you should generally avoid this, but no one would blame you for ...


9

売{う}ってる is an informal contracted form of 売っている. In the 〜ている construction, いる is a special type of verb called a "subsidiary verb" (or 補助動詞 in Japanese), a verb which serves a grammatical purpose rather than having its literal meaning, and this type of verb very often contracts with 〜て.


8

しとけ = しておけ = する + おく Combined with に, this する means "to choose", not "to do". 「どこにも行くなここにしとけ。」 suggests that someone has been looking for a good/best place for something, and the speaker says that no more searching is necessary because that place has been found, which is "this" place. So, your translation is already good. ここにしとけ literally means "Choose ...


8

This is an abbreviated form of 〜てくれない, meaning "to not do 〜 for me". So 貸してくれない means "won't lend me", but phrased as a question like this (likely with a rising intonation) mean "Hey Maruo, won't you lend me your dictionary for a bit?"


8

The actual phone conversation would have gone like this: Guy: 「あ、おかあさん?オレ。今じーちゃんのとこ。」 Mom: 「なんで(じーちゃんのとこにいるの)?」 Guy: 「なんでって・・ 別{べつ}にィ~~~」 What なんでって is a contraction of? It is of 「なんでと」. This 「って」 is the informal version of the quotative particle 「と」. 「なんでと」 in this context means 「なんでと言{い}われても」or 「なんでと聞{き}かれても」, which would roughly translate to "...


7

じゃ is the contraction of では. It's a contraction, because じゃ is one mora (one unit length) and では is two moras long. じゃ is frequently used as contraction of では, especially in じゃない < ではない. As pointed out before by one of our native speakers on this site (@l'électeur), じゃありません is at risk of being overused by learners. Presumably, because the uncontracted では ...


7

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


7

「ばあ」 is a colloquial contraction for 「をば」. It is sometimes used in fiction, children's stories, etc. to show that the speaker is an older person. In meaning and nuance, 「ばあ」=「をば」= an emphatic 「を」 https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%82%92%E3%81%B0-666115#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 「そのへんばあねり歩いてよ」= "(someone) often walks around there"


7

売ってる is a contraction of 売っている. The い in ~ている verb endings is often dropped in casual speech.


7

「~~とくら」 is a colloquial and masculine Tokyo way of pronouncing 「~~と + くる + わ」. This contraction just so quintessentially sounds Tokyo, working-class and "tough-guy-like". (Unlike what many J-learners seem to firmly believe, this 「わ」 is not a feminine sentence-ender.) I am going to call this 「と」 quotative just because there is no other explanation that ...


7

First of all, 「せいせいすらあ」 is a Tokyo tough guy's colloquial version of 「せいせいするわ」 (For those who still believe that 「わ」 is feminine, it is not.) Next, 「せいせいする」. (「清々する」 using kanji.) It is a set phrase expressing how one feels refreshed, relieved, etc. after a big problem has disappeared. My own secret translation of the phrase would be: "Good ...


7

It comes from なんてことだ (source) As the result of a sound change. It is colloquial.


7

いやあ = No / why いい = say いやあ here is a colloquial pronunciation of [言]{い}えば, which is the conditional form (仮定形) of the verb 言う. いい is [良]{い}い. はやくいやあいいのに means [早]{はや}く[言]{い}えばいいのに。 literally "though it would be good if (she) said soon" → (She) should have said it earlier.


6

The extra あ only comes from lengthening the きゃ and could equally well have been written 行きゃ~. Just in the middle of the sentence it looks better as 行きゃあ. The sound is lengthened, because there is a small break when saying the sentence. For example, in 行きゃいいじゃねぇか Why don't you go? a lengthening wouldn't be natural. I presume if you really want, 行ければ ...


6

ときゃ is a contraction of [とき]{時}は 誰と is "with who" Does this answer your questions?


6

えらかァない is a colloquial, collapsed way of saying えらくはない. えらく(連用形/continuative form of えらい) + は(係助詞/binding particle) + negative ない 「おいらよりマシかぁ、なぁんだ、じゃあえらいなぁ。」 「別にえらかァないよ...」 "Better than me? Well, you're distinguished/great, then." "I'm not particularly distinguished/great..."


6

Yes, やんなっちゃう is short for いやになっちゃう, which is short for いやになってしまう. いやになる is a fixed phrase meaning "to be fed up / sick / disgusted". So やんなっちゃうなあ is something like "Now I'm starting to feel disgusted", "I can't help being sick".


6

"1. Can the てお -> と shortcut be used for contexts other than ておく (for example: お世話になっております -> おせわになっとります)?" The なっております-to-なっとります contraction does happen dialectally. You will hear it many times daily in Central Japan and Kansai. I am sure that it is used in many other parts of Western Japan as well. Around Tokyo, you will rarely hear it ...


6

Yes, for example... ~ておいで -> ~といで e.g. 持っておいで -> 持っといで ~ておくれ -> ~とくれ e.g. 来ておくれ -> 来とくれ (← might be Edo/Tokyo dialect) Yes, for example... ~でしまう -> ~じまう (でし→じ) e.g. 死んでしまう -> 死んじまう (→ often contracted to 死んじゃう) ~てしまう -> ~ちまう (てし→ち) e.g. やってしまう -> やっちまう (→ often contracted to やっちゃう) ~てあげる -> ~たげる (てあ→た) e.g. 買ってあげる -> 買ったげる ~であげる -> ~だげる (であ→...


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