21

誰探してんの is a contracted form of 誰探してるの, which in turn is a contracted form of 誰(を)探しているの ("Who are you looking for?", notice the progressive form). More generally: ている contracts to てる. (See this chart) /r/ + vowel before a /n/ consonant can turn into ん in casual speech. (Do not confuse this ん as explanatory-の.) Examples: わからない。 → わかんない。 wakaranai → wakan'...


16

There is なのです (often contracted to なんです), which fits the bill. Just like you suspect, it is declarative/emphatic. This なんです is unrelated to 何{なん}です, but rather a combination of な (the inflection of the copula だ, if you like), the nominalizer の plus the "politifier" です. It also exists in non-polite form: なのだ・なんだ. It really appears everywhere, e.g. as a ...


13

救われん is made of 救われる and the archaic suffix ん, which came out of む. む・ん had similar roles to よう・おう today; that is to say, 救われん in modern style would be 救われよう or 救われるだろう. It is not related to the ん that comes out of ぬ, which is a strong or dialectal way of stating a negative. Additionally, as chocolate says in the comments, 祈り信じよ means 'Pray and believe', ...


10

It's uttered as a colloquial, casual and exclamatory phrase. It's typically used in response to a situation/stimulation that strikes you suddenly. っ is often added after the stem. 高っ! (Wow,) it's expensive! やば(っ)! (Wow,) this is bad! 痛っ! Ouch! きもちわる(っ)! Gross! In formal settings, you should generally avoid this, but no one would blame you for ...


9

ニコニコしとれば 悪さは しねえし いつの間にか いねくなっちまうんだ。 This is the same as the following sentence written in the standard Japanese. ニコニコしていれば悪さはしないし、いつの間にかいなくなってしまうんだ。 If you keep smiling, they won't do bad things, and they go away before you notice. The original sentence is not in a particular "dialect", but a typical role language of an old man/lady (aka 老人語). しとる ...


9

帝国がってんなら、 It looks like a contracted pronunciation of 帝国がと言うのなら。 ~というのなら → ~ってのなら → ~ってんなら (The particle って can be the colloquial version of という.) I think the sentence literally means: 『帝国が』と言うのなら、 If you mean "The empire (did...)," この旅の間にも on this trip, too 何度か見てきたろ? you've already seen (what it's capable of) several times, haven't you?


8

This is an abbreviated form of 〜てくれない, meaning "to not do 〜 for me". So 貸してくれない means "won't lend me", but phrased as a question like this (likely with a rising intonation) mean "Hey Maruo, won't you lend me your dictionary for a bit?"


8

してる is simply a colloquial contracted form of している, similarly one has してない contracted from していない. It is very common in spoken language, but ungrammatical in "proper" (school) grammar. This contraction is maybe similar to contractions such as she had/would → she'd it is → it's I have → I've.


7

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


7

じゃ is the contraction of では. It's a contraction, because じゃ is one mora (one unit length) and では is two moras long. じゃ is frequently used as contraction of では, especially in じゃない < ではない. As pointed out before by one of our native speakers on this site (@l'électeur), じゃありません is at risk of being overused by learners. Presumably, because the uncontracted では ...


6

ス in this case is a colloquial shortening of です. I think the reason people write it with Katakana is that it makes it easier to tell that's a new word rather than んす being a typographical error for something else. If you look for っす you can find entries that explain that this is a [丁寧]{ていねい} colloquialism (http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%A3%E3%81%99). ...


6

売ってる is a contraction of 売っている. The い in ~ている verb endings is often dropped in casual speech.


6

Yes, for example... ~ておいで -> ~といで e.g. 持っておいで -> 持っといで ~ておくれ -> ~とくれ e.g. 来ておくれ -> 来とくれ (← might be Edo/Tokyo dialect) Yes, for example... ~でしまう -> ~じまう (でし→じ) e.g. 死んでしまう -> 死んじまう (→ often contracted to 死んじゃう) ~てしまう -> ~ちまう (てし→ち) e.g. やってしまう -> やっちまう (→ often contracted to やっちゃう) ~てあげる -> ~たげる (てあ→た) e.g. 買ってあげる -> 買ったげる ~であげる -> ~だげる (であ→...


6

It is a sound change of "とは". It may be used in old city(下町 in Japanese) in Tokyo.


6

You think right, that といて is a shortened, colloquial version of ておいて. In other words, ~とく is a casual version of ~ておく where basically て+お is merged into と. More precisely the shortenings work as follows: ~ておいて / でおいて --> ~といて / どいて ~ておく / でおく --> ~とく / どく Note also the negative case: ~ておかないで / でおかないで --> ~とかないで / どかないで In your example, 置く has ...


6

It comes from なんてことだ (source) As the result of a sound change. It is colloquial.


5

えらかァない is a colloquial, collapsed way of saying えらくはない. えらく(連用形/continuative form of えらい) + は(係助詞/binding particle) + negative ない 「おいらよりマシかぁ、なぁんだ、じゃあえらいなぁ。」 「別にえらかァないよ...」 "Better than me? Well, you're distinguished/great, then." "I'm not particularly distinguished/great..."


5

Yes, やんなっちゃう is short for いやになっちゃう, which is short for いやになってしまう. いやになる is a fixed phrase meaning "to be fed up / sick / disgusted". So やんなっちゃうなあ is something like "Now I'm starting to feel disgusted", "I can't help being sick".


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