17

I'm fairly certain that this has to do with pitch in Japanese and accentuation in English. The natural pitch for デバグ【HLL】 is HLL, whereas デバッグ【LHLL】 would naturally be LHL (and バグ【HL】 is HL). To mimic accentuation by pitch (i.e. accented syllables get a high pitch after transliteration), the ッ is necessary to give the バ a (natural) high pitch. バグ already ...


12

It's off-topic, but upgrading OS is recommended as Windows XP support is already terminated. The reason why the glyphs differ is because the rule changed in 2004, after the release of XP. The following chart (from WP) would be the summary. The second from left of row 4 is the 噌. It becomes rendered in more traditional shape since 2004. The JIS standard ...


10

Given that the format 0x[0-9A-F] is baked into nearly every modern computer language, there aren't any other options for representing them in text. But there is still the question of pronouncing them. I suspect the answer will depend on the individual company culture to some extent. At our company, the digits are pronounced in Japanese: ぜろ、いち、に... and the ...


9

If you look at menus in programs such as Open Office, words such as "編集" for 'edit', "挿入" for 'insert', and "設定" for 'configure' (or rather, configuration) all are nouns, but can be made verbs by adding the verb "する" as in "記録する" for 'save' (file, etc.). A case where you might use a dictionary form of a verb to describe the ACTION could be for 'open' (a ...


8

囲み文字 are derived from Edo period corporate logos called 表号 which were one of the standard ways of naming or identifying a shop (屋号). You may see in the countryside some companies identify themselves with logos that look like hats or carpenter's squares. There is a good survey of traditional logos from one town here: http://www.kokuhei.com/sa-ken/hyogo.htm ...


8

This decorative frame can be called 飾り罫 (かざりけい). 飾り罫 can be text-based or not, it means any kind of dingbat-style framing in general.


8

They both can mean the same thing but they are not the same. Probably a similar problem to 目標 and 目的. The main difference to me is the point of view. User's point of view => 要求 Dev's point of view => 要件 要求 would be functionalities the user is looking for. While 要件 would be functionalities the system need to do to answer the 要求. In my company, we first go ...


7

According to Microsoft Language Portal, they call it “wait cursor” in English and “待機カーソル” in Japanese in the documentation for Visual Studio 2008 SP1, 2010, and 2012. I am not sure how popular this term is among users.


6

Always use 行 (ぎょう) for the lines (in a book chapter, a programming code, etc.), no matter whether the sentence is written horizontally (横書き) or vertically (縦書き). For example, "Removing three lines from the CSS file" is as follows: CSSファイルから3行抜く


6

These are called 組文字, whose main purpose is to save space. Certain words such as アパート (="apartment building"), 株式会社 (="co. ltd.") appear in address books so often that publishing firms had special movable types with tiny fonts for them. Some common combinations were adopted in the JIS standard, on which Unicode was based. 組文字 might have been relatively ...


5

I would just use Google Translate on a smartphone with a touch screen. It's pretty accurate. Edit: Guys, I don't get the downvotes. The question was Is there a way of typing Japanese characters when you have no knowledge of the language? And I say: Yes indeed, you can just draw whatever character(s) you see in the drawing box. サッポロ is just an example to ...


5

From what I can gather, this shirt appears to be made somewhere other than in Japan, as the top and bottom line of characters mean nothing intelligible (unless you start making up your own meanings for each section of the random list of characters.) The middle line is closer to something that makes sense, and it almost reads: Sapporo Beer. (But the ...


5

This isn't a 100% sure answer based on experience, but a little investigation leads me to believe that in the IT context these two words are synonymous. Here we see both ユーザー要件 and ユーザー要求 Here we see both used for system requirements. It's also written here as 必要最小システム構成 for "minimum system requirements." Here we see "requirement gathering" simply stated as ...


5

This is the prefix 直{じか} ("direct"), plus 打{う}ち, a noun form of the verb 打つ ("to hit"), which in this case refers to typing ("hitting" keys). Although I couldn't find a dictionary entry for this exact term, it's described in the entry for IP直打ち in the IT用語辞典 on Weblio, which confirms that the reading is じかうち. This page also confirms that it means "direct(...


5

If it's chiefly a "visual redesign", I'd say デザインを新しくします(しました)。("We'll have/We've got a new design!") 更新: It'll mean "update" of website, like adding a new article on WordPress. Maybe デザインの更新 would get your meaning across. The "refresh" sense is limited to browser function. 改築: It sounds like you revamp the site's structure, or something. 改造: Same as above, ...


5

「ループ」と「繰り返し」と「反復」は全く同じ意味だと思います。「反復」は、ややアカデミックで固い印象があります。発音しやすいので会話では「ループ」が最も使われています。動詞として使う場合、"to process an (entire) loop" の意味で使うなら「ループ処理をする」「繰り返しを行う」「反復処理をする」など、"to go to the next loop" の意味で使うなら「ループする」「繰り返す」「反復する」です。 「イテレータ」「イテレーション」「イテレートする」も技術者であれば問題なく知っており、日常的に使う単語だと思います。ただしご存知の通り、多くのプログラミング言語で Iterator は特殊な意味を持っており、それと誤解されやすいので、一般的な(for-loop などの)...


4

Like the site that helix pointed out, dummy text generators will just pick some works and generate text from that. There's not one classic text that almost every designer uses. The work that this dummy text generator uses by default is "私の個人主義" ("My Individualism") by 夏目漱石 (Soseki Natsume)


4

You would be better off using the 日. The same in other language, without unit the number does not mean anything.


4

You present four choices: I don't think you should use コメントアウトする to mean "uncomment". It properly means "comment out", but unfortunately, the meaning may not be obvious unless you're familiar with the English term. It has caused confusion in the past, so if I used the term at all, I'd be prepared to clarify by saying either コメントにする or コメントにして無視されるようにする. I ...


3

Consensus in the ALC corpus (all technical entries that match your example case) would be for コメント解除【かいじょ】する. Ex: デフォルトの/etc/rsyncd.conf設定ファイルを編集し、[gentoo-portage]の部分をコメント解除し、addressオプションを追加します。 GPMを使用する前に、マウスの接続場所とプロトコルに対応する行をコメント解除する必要があります。 One example uses コメントを外す【はずす】, which also makes sense, but seems less common: ...


3

You are looking for 必須(の/な)引数 => required parameter(s). and 任意(の/な)引数 => optional parameter(s)


3

I doubt there is a direct equivalent. If you don't mind rephrasing it, you can use: 配信する (to distribute) 応答する (to respond) 処理する (to process) But in programming contexts, just using サーブする is also a good idea. There is no good kanji word for server, after all. EDIT: The reason why serve is difficult to translate literally is because one can say both "serve ...


3

This heavily depends on your target audience. If you write something to IT workers, ハッカー can safely refer to non-evil ones. For example, this ロシアの天才ハッカーによる新人エンジニアサバイバルガイド (with almost 6000 likes from Japanese engineers) obviously uses ハッカー in its non-evil sense. Rest assured, people who may be interested in this article will never think he is a criminal :) ...


3

The meaning of "繰り返し処理", "反復処理", and "ループ(処理)" are same and we often omit "する". As you indicated, "ループ" usually refers to a certain processing via for/while loop, but programmers also use the words "繰り返し処理" and "反復処理" as loop. As of the "イテレータ", it is the interface with which we access the contents of list, vector, tuple, dictionary and so on. [1] 繰り返し処理(...


3

I doubt there is a good linguistic reason for this. Probably someone happened to come up with "Now Loading", and other developers followed without thinking much about it. This is not surprising at all. After all, Japanese people have coined tons of wasei-eigo terms and kept using them without thinking about them. Another similar example is "Sorry, this site ...


2

Hacker /ˈhækər/ 1. One who likes to program. 2. One who utilizes technology to go beyond the limits inherent to the design of an application. As for today in 2017, there is not a word in Japanese corresponding to "hacker" with the definition written above, so we have no way to write it in Japanese. ハッカー is understood in Japan only as a "cracker" or a "...


1

Like you mentioned, 性能試験 is a performance test. If it's a server side, checking how many connections can be handled or how long it takes to return a response. Mainly focusing to know its performance. But the case of 強化試験, It's for finding bugs. And it's not a regular test like unit tests nor integration tests. It simply means a additional test for finding ...


1

性能試験 is simply performance test, and is used widely in many fields related to engineering, including software engineering. I don't think 強化試験 is a common term, but judging from usages found on the net, it seems to refer to additional tests to ensure something (performance, conformance, stability, etc) You may need to ask your colleagues what 強化試験 actually ...


1

By all accounts, the word is written plainly as: ハッカー Just as in English, the Japanese also do understand both the negative connotation of the term and its wider use that includes all sorts of people with deep knowledge and engineering abilities when it comes to computing. You can find the general consensus about the word in this compilation of ...


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