9

Counters aren't necessary any more in Japanese than gendered nouns are in romance languages, e.g. la vache vs. le chat. English has something extremely similar to counters called Collective Nouns. When you see several fish, you call it a "school of fish". You wouldn't say a "school of wolves", you'd say a "pack of wolves". Are these necessary? Anyone could ...


7

Due to the way kanji are typed (i.e. using an IME which presents you with candidates from a dictionary), and the fact that Japanese kana usage is by-and-large phonemic (i.e. you write it how you say it), there aren't really many mistakes that are entirely analogous to your/you're or there/their/they're, etc. Probably the closest thing is typing something ...


6

From Online Etymology Dictionary buy (v.) Old English bycgan (past tense bohte) "to buy, pay for, acquire; redeem, ransom; procure; get done," from Proto-Germanic *bugjan (source also of Old Saxon buggjan, Old Norse byggja, Gothic bugjan), which is of unknown origin and not found outside Germanic. The surviving spelling is southwest England ...


6

For ease of comparison, most Japanese Kanji text in this answer will be rendered in Kyūjitai, which are almost 100% identical to Korean Hanja. Short answer No, Korean mixed script (「[國漢文混用]{국한문혼용}」, 漢字ハングル混じり文) does not employ the equivalent of Japanese kun'yomi (「[訓讀]{훈독}」, hun-dok). Longer answer They do exist, but you wouldn't come across any of ...


5

ないです。 It's only a superficial coincidence in present-day pronunciation. The word corresponds to English buy is assumed to have been pronounced like *bugjaną //buɣ.jɑ.nɑ̃// in Proto-Germanic period around 500 BC. Meanwhile, 買 is assumed to have been pronounced like *mˁrajʔ (Baxter-Sagart) or *mreːʔ (Zhengzhang) in the Central Plain of China. It still ...


4

From a hypothetical perspective I'll concede that it's not impossible to be effective in Japanese without kanji (after all, Korean is very similar in a number of critical ways here, and has been functioning largely without Chinese characters for 60 years—and North Korea has completely abolished their use), however there are many practical benefits to be ...


4

Counter words are not necessary, but many languages do use them. My favourite counter in English for illustrative purposes is "sheet(s)", as in "two sheets of paper". With other counters like "two bottles of beer", you can sometimes get away with "two beers", but "two papers" doesn't mean "two sheets of ...


3

Adding to @bcioutier's great answer, it is somewhat wrong to assume there are counters only in Japanese or there are no counters in English as @Eiríkr Útlendi commented. I am not saying you are assuming so. English uses a couple to indicate two. And there are a half a dozen to mean six, a dozen for twelve, a score for 20, a gross (12 dozens) for 144, etc....


3

I understand this is difficult. As an English learner, I read the English grammar rules you cited more than 20 years ago, and I still often wonder how to correctly use the past tense and the present perfect in English :) This takes a very long time, so don't let this halt your studying of Japanese. The good news is た and ている are often interchangeable, as ...


2

When the Japanese learn English, they find the tenses hard to grasp. We have more verbal tenses than Japanese. This is the first point. 1)Japanese is quite simple because there really are present (+ present ongoing) and Past. 卒業is an event. So when you talk about life experience (assume it already happened), you use Past tense. 卒業している sounds unnatural. ...


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