10

いえ is definitely used informally for いいえ, though it's not super casual. More casual options include いや, ううん, or 違う. That being said, you don't necessarily need a word that means 'no'; you can reply to 「フランスに行ったことある?」with just 「ないよ」


9

かまっち is just the name of a monster in DQ9 (かま is 鎌, and -っち is a kind of suffix). って is a colloquial version of という. かまっちって魔物 monster called Kamatchi


8

てしんぜよう means "I'll do you a favor", and it is a stereotypical phrase associated with samurais. Generally, it gives an arrogant impression (or, at least it signals that the speaker genuinely thinks of themselves to be "above" the conversation partner). It is only used when the speaker is supposed to be a samurai or similar. In this ...


8

叫んどんねん is short for 叫んどるねん, which is short for 叫んでおるねん, which is 叫んでいるんだ(よ) said in Osaka-ben. There is no negation. おる is used instead of いる in many western dialects to denote progressive aspect. See: おる in honorific contexts and Existence verbs in the Kansai Dialect ておる/でおる very commonly contracts to とる/どる. See this chart. /r/ + vowel before /n/ can ...


7

あわてなさんな ≂ あわてるな "No hurry" "Don't panic" なさんな is a contracted pronunciation of なさるな. なさるな consists of: literary honorific 「なさる」 + negative imperative final particle 「な」.


7

Your first interpretation is correct. In Tokyo metropolitan dialect, ……では is contracted as ……じゃ and ないか in ……じゃないか can be omitted (usually denoted with a ellipsis). Therefore, 「好きなんじゃ……」って思うかな in Tokyo metropolitan dialect is equivalent to 好きなのではないかと思うかな in Standard Japanese. On the other hand, this second interpretation 「好き」なんだと言う。思うかな sounds ...


6

けぇっちまえーっ means 帰{かえ}っちまえ. けえる is a working-class accent of かえる in Tokyo. It is 東京下町ことば. A sound of "ai" changes to that of "ee" in that accent in some words such as ちげーねー(違いない), でぇーこん(だいこん). http://www.muse.dti.ne.jp/~squat/tokyoben.htm 「~ ちまえ」is a rough way of saying 「~ てしまえ」. So けぇっちまえーっ is something like "Just get out!".


5

In general, Japanese もらった is more like an interjection said excitedly when the speaker thinks they have almost gotten a goal or something is "in the bag". You can think it's short for 勝利は(ほぼ)もらった or ゴールは(ほぼ)もらった. Since the implied object is usually not ボール, it does not mean the speaker is going to handle the ball, nor does it mean the speaker ...


5

Just to complete the answer from grove. 艶肌 is actually referenced by dictionaries as つやはだ. つやはだ (知恵蔵の解説) うるおい感、パール感、素肌感など様々な質感で演出するつややかな肌をいう。パール感のあるベースで明るくソフトなつや感を演出した肌のこと。かさつきがなく、しっとりとしたベースでうるおいのあるつや感を演出するつや肌、素肌のような薄づき感でつややかさを演出するつや肌などつや肌といっても微妙な質感が存在しており、生き生きとしたイメージ、上品なイメージ、健康感のあるイメージなど様々である。また、つや肌は顔全体の立体感までも演出する。つやのない肌はメリハリがなく、のっぺりした印象に見えがちである。 ...


5

A quick google search reveals that ツヤ肌 is another common spelling for the word that you're looking for. Furthermore, on youtube you can find videos of youtubers enunciating the word as ツヤハダ (see for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12BUWKAlYSk). As for the broader question of guessing the reading of a neologism, I guess there are not set rules. A lot ...


5

This ~でねえ is a contraction of ~でない, which is an old-fashioned negative imperative expression. ない changed to ねえ (/ai/-to-/ee/ contraction). 何も言うでない ! meaning and origin What is じゃねぇか? What is its original form? Both ~でない and ~でねえ are used as part of stereotypical old-fashioned speech, but their typical users are quite different. ~でない is used by pompous ...


5

Firstly, is there supposed to be a ろ after the end of 住んでるとこ(as in, ところ, and was it cut short due to conversation?) It was indeed shortened from ところ, but とこ is an extremely common abbreviation of ところ used in colloquial speech, so I wouldn't say that it was "supposed to be" ところ. This is mentioned briefly here (for an entirely different usage of ところ)...


4

っちゅう is a rather common colloquial contraction of っていう = という, so you may simply read it as うちらに確実に勝てるっていうのか!!


4

というか っていうか とゆーか, とゆうか, とゆっか ってゆーか, ってゆうか, ってゆっか ちゅーか, ちゅうか つーか, つうか つか These are all variants of というか. They have many roles. Used to make the sentence less certain: "kind of", "kinda", "sorta", "maybe" まあ和食は好きっていうか。 Yeah, I kinda like Japanese cuisine. Used to rephrase or correct previous sentences (in an uncertain ...


3

It's almost certainly a contraction of 見てはいない ("[someone] is not seeing it" or "[someone] has not seen it"). It can also be a contraction of 見てしまいなさい ("Watch it anyway!") at least in one western dialect I know, but it's rare. In casual speech, ては very often contracts to ちゃ (and では contracts to じゃ). See Purpose of adj+kucha and ...


3

["バスケット部がなんでいバスケット部が!"] なんでい is the masculine form of なんだい,なんなの,なにさ, etc as explained in the comment. It seems to be a variant of the Edo dialect べらんめえ口調. Without the context, the meaning is hard to figure out. Probably the phrase is used in a condescending manner. The speaker probably does not like the basketball club, so they uttered the ...


3

Is it common to censor or soften 馬鹿 as ばしゃ? No, it is not. As you can see in this page, ばしゃあぁぁ is an original word used by the particular character in that anime, created by the author. It's not used by or known to ordinary people in real life.


3

I live in rural Wakayama and young children (around the beginning of primary school) use さ A LOT when they speak - at least when speaking to each other. They use it at the end of single words, at the end of short sentences, at the end of long sentences... It's definitely used as a filler/a colloquial style of speech.


3

こうしちゃおれん is a contraction of こうしてはいられない. It's used by an ojisan-type speaker. ては becomes ちゃ in colloquial speech. おれん is a colloquial negative form of おれる, which is a potential form of おる, which is a little dialectal variant of いる. こうしてはいられない literally means "I/We cannot be doing this", but it's an idiom that means something along the lines of &...


3

The たれ is a contracted pronunciation of てやれ, which consists of the て-form + やれ. So [止]{と}めたれ is a contracted pronunciation of [止]{と}めてやれ. As you can see in these threads: ておく → とく in other contexts; similar 2-kana to 1-kana shortcuts? What is this colloquial / dialect form? 〜たるけんね How is たる being used here? ~てやる can contract to ~たる. So can its imperative ...


3

It is only the ending か + オイ ("Hey!"). With オイ, it sounds like the speaker demanding the listener's attention/response. This sounds rude, and in that sense, can be called a slang. Depending on contexts, it can mean hostility. Note that オイ is not a grammatical ending. It is just Hey. プール行くかオイ : Are we going to a pool, aren't we? can be written ...


3

It is a myth that 全然 must be accompanied by a negative word. Quoting from here 「一体生徒が全然悪いです」(夏目漱石「坊っちゃん」明治39年) 「全然、自分の意志に支配されている」(芥川龍之介「羅生門」大正4年) These are examples where 全然 + positive by famous writers. I think this is gradually 'demystified' over these years and people use 全然 + positive freely. See e.g. this. Regarding your question, 全然いいと思います means here ...


3

The talker is saying "トイレの個室で何叫んでるんだよ" (Roughly means What the hell are you yelling about in the bathroom stall?) in Kansai dialect, not slur. It can be divided like: トイレ | の | 個室 | で | 何 | 叫んどん | ねん トイレ | の | 個室 | で | 何 | 叫んでるん | だよ


2

っての is not short for というのか but short for というの or といっているの. ("っての?" can still be a question with a rising intonation.) The first ての (=というの) is used to seeking clarification. The second ての is just "I say", and it's a way of emphasizing something with an irritated overtone. Related: Meaning of ってのも/というのも How would one parse "金ってのは金のある[…]...


2

It's clear from the context that this is a typo for 真っ黒だったかな (with furigana applied by some kind of automatic process). The interpretation of the first line would then be: クロを[飼]{か}っていて [前]{まえ}とちょっと[違]{ちが}うなって[思]{おも}うことがあります Since I started keeping Kuro, there's times that I think something's changed from before... そんなに[目]{め}が[見]{み}えないくらい[真]{ま}っ[黒]{くろ}...


2

It is a working-class accent of たたきつけて. I feel it is べらんめえ口調(江戸言葉). https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%B1%9F%E6%88%B8%E8%A8%80%E8%91%89


2

This is a colloquial form for 「する-か」. I don't think this is considered to be a particular dialect. (This form isn't used in western dialect, so it feels a bit eastern to my ear, just as the standard Japanese language does.) In the dialog, A invites B to eat together, and B agrees (そうすっか == そうするか). Other examples you might encounter is ~~でもすっか = でもするか.


2

It's a little bit of a tricky word. A proper translation would be: From what I've seen, he/she seems to be a pretty good bandit too. Well, I (or you)'ll have to be as good as him/her. ならんとな is a corrupted form of "ならないと(いけない/だめだ)な". So (if I'm understanding right) both of your ideas are (sadly) wrong.


2

と often informally takes the form って. It doesn't necessarily imply という here. 「なんで俺ら『空白』が兄妹だって知ってんだ?」=「なんで俺ら『空白』が兄妹だと知っているのだ?」


2

誰だって means "anyone" or "whoever". It's a colloquial variant of 誰でも. We say 何だって, どこだって, いつだって, etc., too. こうなる just means "to become like this", and こう refers to 混乱する. って here is a sentence ender meaning "you know", "come on", "I mean it", etc. I think it's etymologically a quotative particle with ...


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