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19 votes
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Are 变 and 変 the same?

They are both slightly different simplifications of the traditional Chinese character which is 變. 变 is the simplified Chinese and 変 the shinjitai, i.e. the Japanese simplification. Often the ...
Earthliŋ's user avatar
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16 votes

Can I use my Chinese name as my Japanese name?

Just from personal experience (purely anecdotal), I came across a few Chinese people who all used their original characters hanzi pretty regularly in work scenarios, normally without furigana (name ...
BJCUAI's user avatar
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14 votes
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What is the etymology of the phrase 隴を得て蜀を望む?

What is the etymology of the phrase 隴を得て蜀を望む? We can reorder the characters to get 得隴望蜀, which is a Chinese-language yojijukugo. This phrase may reference a few unrelated historical events. The ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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12 votes
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Kun Yomi of Chinese origin, like 竹 (take)

Short answer: probably yes, but we don't know a lot about it. We don't have enough documentation about the earliest stages of Japanese to be sure, but the consensus is that a bunch of the oldest ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
12 votes
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Is Japanese に related to the Chinese character 仁?

Yes, the kana に is derived from the Chinese character ([漢字]{かんじ}, kanji) 仁. See also the English Wiktionary page and the Japanese Wikipedia page, among other references. All kana derived from kanji. ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
11 votes
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If you learn the 2000 most common kanji, how many of the 2000 most common hanzi would you know?

Using 2,136 as a reference number (total number of Jōyō kanji) There are 3,079 unique* characters which form the 2,136 most frequent Mainland Chinese + Taiwan Chinese characters. 1567 Jōyō Kanji are ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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11 votes
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What is the difference between 中国人, 華人, 漢人, and 唐人?

It's like this: 中国人: "a person with Chinese nationality" 漢人: "a person from the Han dynasty" "a person of Han (Chinese) ethnicity" 華人: "a person of ethnically Han ancestry living outside of China" ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
11 votes
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Is kanban (看板) really the same in Japanese and Chinese?

They just look identical in romanizations. A Japanese person and a Chinese person might understand each other with their native readings, but the real pronunciations have non-negligible differences. ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
9 votes
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meanings of 曖昧{あいまい} between Japanese and Chinese

No, 曖昧 on its own does not mean 曖昧な関係 in Japanese. The following article written in Japanese explains 曖昧 has broader meanings in Chinese. 【中国語】曖昧 àimèi この中国語の「曖昧」は、日本語より意味が広くて、日本語と同じ意味のほかに、まず「...
naruto's user avatar
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9 votes

Are on’yomi words loanwords?

As far as Japanese is concerned, loanwords (外来語) usually refer to words brought into Japan from countries other than China and written in katakana. But strictly speaking, it depends on how you define ...
naruto's user avatar
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9 votes
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How do Zen students learn the readings for jakugo?

I am not a native speaker, however I am familiar with these texts. My impression is that even native speakers do not necessarily know how to read these texts. It's not that they couldn't come up with ...
A.Ellett's user avatar
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7 votes
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Name of レ点 in 漢文

The レ点 means first read the next character (that is the character below since it was written from top to bottom at that time) then read the previous character. Ex: 帰ル(レ点)国ニ should read 国に帰る. Before, ...
永劫回帰's user avatar
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7 votes
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Similarity between 挟む and 狭む

1. Why is the verb 狭{せば}む so rare/weird? As user naruto said in the comments, the reason you don't see 狭{せば}む much in modern Japanese (and that your input method can't handle it) is that this is a ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
7 votes
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Can I use a Chinese newspaper to learn kanji radicals and maybe some kanji?

It is not a good idea to learn Japanese Kanji reading Chinese newspapers. Of course, a majority of Chinese characters used both in China and Japan have same or similar meanings, however, the grammar ...
Rathony's user avatar
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7 votes
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Variations in the "same" kanji, how do you know which one to use?

What is this kind of variation called? Like is there a name for it? In English they are called "variant (character)", in Japanese 異体字 itaiji. There are different types of variants, often though ...
Earthliŋ's user avatar
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7 votes
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What is the etymology of あした?

The word ashita is purely Japanese. The spelling 明日 comes from Chinese. A note about reading types For any word where the reading is the 訓【くん】読【よ】み, the word itself as pronounced is (almost always) ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
7 votes
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Do the Japanese read Classical Chinese poems in Japanese or in on-readings?

There is always trade-off, as you said. Thus naturally we have both approaches, depending on what policy and objective you have. Your #1 is called 訓読 ("interpretative reading") in Japanese, and ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
7 votes
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波比不部保 ([B] sounds) → はひふへほ ([h] or [f] sounds)

On'yomi and Chinese: how sounds correlate In almost* any discussion of kanji usage in Japanese, do not use the Mandarin pronunciations as any kind of guide to the Japanese pronunciations. (* The ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
6 votes

Shin Kanzen Master has a Chinese element?

Why do these people think that there is some Chinese element to these books? Because 「语」「测」「试」 are Simplified Chinese. These characters are written as 「語」「測」「試」 in Japanese. Also, 「测试」("exam, ...
chocolate's user avatar
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6 votes
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曜日 and 曜 don't mean the same but xx曜日 and xx曜 are synonyms?

No, 曜 on its own does not mean weekday. Where did you read that it refers to weekdays? The Japanese word for weekday as opposed to weekend/holiday is 平日. I don't speak Chinese, but both ~曜日 and ~曜 ...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes

Why is 犬 used to refer to "dog" in Japanese?

From what I can gather, it seems like 犬 was the original Chinese word for "dog" and 狗 developed later, originally as a slang term for dogs in everyday life. (The radical on the left of the 狗 kanji is ...
Ben Roffey's user avatar
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6 votes
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Does Korean hanja usage correspond to Japanese kun'yomi and on'yomi kanji usage?

For ease of comparison, most Japanese Kanji text in this answer will be rendered in Kyūjitai, which are almost 100% identical to Korean Hanja. Short answer No, Korean mixed script (「[國漢文混用]{국한문혼용}」, ...
dROOOze's user avatar
  • 9,110
6 votes
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Can I use my Chinese name as my Japanese name?

Yes you can of course, as many have said. However, I am not sure why nobody mentioned that you can also pretty much use the kanji in your name and just associate to them a Japanese pronunciation as ...
Tommy's user avatar
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6 votes

Specific examples of tonal Chinese words rendered into Japanese

Keywords: MC, Middle Chinese; OC, Old Chinese: MJ: Middle Japanese; OJ, Old Japanese; 呉, Go'on; 漢, Kan'on; 唐, Tō-on; /(absence of superscript)/ or 平, level tone; /X/ or 上, rising tone; /H/ or 去, ...
dROOOze's user avatar
  • 9,110
6 votes

Kanji etymology of 毎?

According to the Wiktionary entry, the 母 portion is purely phonetic -- that is, it has to do with the [ancient] Chinese pronunciation.
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
6 votes

Kanji etymology of 毎?

「每{まい}」(Baxter-Sagart OC: /*mˤəʔ/; Shinjitai:「毎」) was originally a picture of a woman「女」wearing a headdress, indicating the meaning married woman > adult woman, mother.「女」was later phoneticised into「母{...
dROOOze's user avatar
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6 votes
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Do all な-adjectives come from Chinese?

The answer is no. Some na-adjectives are from Western languages (e.g., スマートな, アバンギャルドな) and some are from native Japanese words (e.g., 朗らかな, 静かな). As an aside, there are also a few i-adjectives coined ...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes
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Were there any specifics rules that were used to convert Chinese vocabulary into Japanese? Are they still perceptible in Modern Chinese?

Phonemes are not really applicable to the Chinese character system, but there was (and still is) indeed a systematic approach to convert most Chinese characters' pronunciation into Japanese on'yomi, ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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5 votes
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Are Japanese people aware of the Chinese meanings of Kanji?

To native speakers of Japanese, 理查德 and 约瑟夫 mean nothing. To me, they are just some random kanji, most of which are unfamiliar. (Japanese people only use 理 and 夫.) I don't even know if it's a proper ...
naruto's user avatar
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