15

There's a quick way to know this. The place where a space can be inserted is roughly the same place where ね can be naturally inserted. あらわれでたのはね、 くろマントにね、くろいね、ぼうしのね、さんにんぐみ。 それはそれはね、こわーいね、どろぼうさまのね、おでかけだ。 Actually this structure is known as 文節. Basically, a 文節 starts with a noun/adjective/verb/adverb/etc, optionally followed by one or more subsidiary ...


11

アメテ! is baby speech for やめて! (Stop it!).


10

This question is quite broad, but of course child-directed speech also exists in Japanese. You probably know ~さん → ~ちゃん is said to be both children's speech as well as child-directed speech, but it is very very common in conversations with no involvement of children. Doubling à la "wakie wakie" is also common (especially for one mora words). Without ...


7

The sequence 体は小さいけれど元気な serves as an adjectival block which modifies [一寸法師]{いっすんぼうし}. 体は小さいけれど元気な一寸法師 is object of the verb 気に入り, in turn. [大臣]{だいじん}(は) is its subject. So, the whole sentence has kind of a nested structure, and the two は belong to different levels respectively.


4

There are several issues here. First, let's review the “meaning” of Gegege; then let's think a bit more carefully about what does it mean to try to classify words as "parts of speech", and how does Gegege fit into them. The word Gegege was created by Shigeru Mizuki based on the way he mispronounced his name as a toddler: Gegeru. So our first attempt could ...


3

Apparently ゲゲゲ comes from the nickname ゲゲゲのしげる GeGeGe no Shigeru of the creator of the series Shigeru Mizuki, who pronounced his name げげる as a small child. (At least this seems to be the consensus of this 教えて!goo question, citing interviews with Mizuki broadcast on Japanese television.) In other words, ゲゲゲ is a representation of child speech. I think that ...


3

This practice is known as 分{わ}かち書{が}き. As you said, it's not really used in normal written Japanese. Spaces, however, are used in texts that are mostly kana based, such as those for kids or for foreigners new to the language. Its purpose is to separate words and to help avoid confusion. Wikipedia gives the example of: こうしまるやさいいち being interpretable as ...


3

I don't know what Matsuko actually said, but I would say both words are almost the same in terms of childishness. To me うんこ sounds more explicit and vulgar, while うんち is a bit more euphemistic, milder or cuter. So "careful adults should use うんち in variety shows" is an understandable statement (especially when it was a women who firstly said it). That said, ...


2

お巡りさん is juvenile word for 巡査, which according to Wiki is the lowest rank equivalent to Patrolman. The kanji is a combination of 巡 = Patrols and 査 = Investigates. It would be acceptable in casual conversation or if you were friends with the cop, but not something I would call to the person responding to your 110番 call. 警察官 would address any person working ...


2

Quite a bit more sophisticated than the "alphabet song", there is a wonderful poem by 北原白秋 (Hakushū Kitahara) called 五十音. It goes like this 五十音 [水馬]{あめんぼ}赤いな。ア、イ、ウ、エ、オ。 [浮藻]{うきも}に[小蝦]{こえび}もおよいでる。 柿{かき}の木、栗{くり}の木。カ、キ、ク、ケ、コ。 [啄木鳥]{きつつき}、こつこつ、枯{か}れけやき。 [大角豆]{ささげ}に酢{す}をかけ、サ、シ、ス、セ、ソ。 その魚{うお}[浅瀬]{あさせ}で刺{さ}しました。 立ちましょ[喇叭]{らっぱ}で、タ、チ、ツ、テ、ト。 トテトテタッタと飛び立った。 [...


2

There are a lot of ways that these over-generalizations occur doing child language acquisition. They do in fact occur -- often -- in Japanese. In fact, I think it is safe to say that they occur in every language. There's a rather in depth list of examples of some of these over-generalizations available in the papers referenced below. I will describe one ...


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