6

Your sentence has two mistakes. In Japanese, i-adjectives (and i-adjective-like auxiliaries たい/ない) don't need a copula (だ). You should end this sentence with たい alone, without だ. See this. 座りたい means "[I] want to sit" because 座る is always intransitive in Japanese. Using を doesn't automatically make it transitive. Instead of plain 座る, you have to ...


6

仕事を終わらせて 終わらせる is the causative verb of 終わる (intransitive). Here the thing that 終わる is 仕事. 仕事が終わる -- the work ends (あなたが)仕事を終わらせる -- lit. (you) make the work end → "(you) finish the work" In 「17時までにこの仕事を終わらせてください。」, the subject of 終わらせる is "you" (unmentioned), and the object is 仕事. Similar examples: 「工期が遅れる」 - 「(人が)工期を遅らせる」 「車が走る」 - 「...


6

You have partly answered your own question. Historically, Japanese has tended not to use an inanimate thing as a subject as if it had its own will. It's usually preferred to rephrase the sentence using a human as the subject. In your examples, you can say: この本を読むと考えさせられる。 (Literally, "When I read this book, I am made to think." Notice the ...


5

「持たせる」に同じ, 「もたせる」の文語形 You found wrong one. In dictionaries, 文語 does not stand for "literary" or "written", but Classical Japanese. The true one you are looking for is less likely found in dictionaries, because it is a colloquial conjugation. The legitimate descendant of the "old" 持たす is 持たせる (which conjugates in ichidan), and ...


5

This is actually a causative-passive construction. Sometimes there is confusion around causative forms because there are actually two causative verbal forms for many verbs. For godan verbs like 組む, there is a 'standard' causative form in which you attach せる to the a-row (未然形) of the verb. For 組む this would be 組ませる. There is also a 'short' causative form in ...


5

As you mentioned, there are both "transitive" and "intransitive" 触れる (What is the difference between に触れる and を触れる?). The transitive 触れる is for touching as a result of somebody moving their body, like your example 肩に手を触れる. It describes an action under one's control, thus usually used when touching or non-touching is most meaningful in ...


5

命中する is always intransitive, and ~を命中する is ungrammatical. デトネータが敵に命中する (intransitive) → (プレイヤーが)デトネータを敵に命中させる (causative) 発動する works both transitively and intransitively. This means コンボを発動する and コンボを発動させる are interchangeable. (But コンボに発動する makes no sense.) コンボが発動する (intransitive) → コンボを発動させる (causative) コンボを発動する (transitive) Related: Differences Between ...


4

私は黒板に彼の注意を向けた。 私は黒板に彼の注意を向けさせた。 私は彼に黒板に注意を向けさせた。 These are basically interchangeable. In Sentence 1, the speaker directly drew his attention to the blackboard (his attention was moved by 私). Sentence 2 is more indirect; the speaker made him to direct his attention to the blackboard (his attention was moved by 彼 because 私 asked him to do so). Sentence 3 is a ...


4

漬からされてた=漬からされていた=漬からせられていた Verbs often have two causatives, one in ~す and one in ~せる. ~す is considered more informal these days, but I think it's the original. So this is the past of the passive causative form. 'has been caused to be submerged,' literally


4

くれる basically means "to give", and もらう basically means "to receive". Let's think about this with simpler examples: 両親が私に本をくれた。 My parents gave a book to me. 私は両親に本をもらった。 (= 私は両親から本をもらった。) I received a book from my parents. In the former, the subject is 両親, and in the latter, the subject is 私. Both has に, but these two に play different ...


4

In most cases, you can use ku-form + する: 値段を安くしてください。 Please make it cheaper. 料理をおいしくするスパイス the spice that makes your dish delicious もっとその話を面白くしよう。 Let's make the story more interesting. However 気味悪い and other i-adjectives related to emotion are a little tricky because they usually have two meanings. 気味悪くさせる usually means "to make it creepy" rather than "...


4

The verb 寝かせる is not the causative form of 寝る, but it is related. The causative form of 寝る is 寝させる. 寝かせる is instead a transitive verb closer in tone to "put to bed" than literally "make sleep" or "let sleep". Japanese is much richer in terms of transitive/intransitive groups of verbs with similar sound and meaning. English has a few: lay/lie, raise/rise, "...


3

As A.Ellet pointed out in a comment, 「私は僕が」 doesn't make sense, so I modified some of the pronouns (or replaced them by nouns) in your question to make the sentences valid. Also, note that I placed pronouns that would be usually omitted in a natural conversation between brackets [ ] . Finally, I also added some complements 野菜【やさい】/ アイスクリーム to make the ...


2

今夜10時までにこのレポートを終わらせなければならない The subject is often omitted in Japanese sentences. As for the agent identification, both "Someone else makes/lets one do the report by 10 p.m." and "I make/let myself have finished the report by 10 p.m." will do. (Probably "let" sounds sparing time doing~ and "make" sounds more coercive.) When you say this to a third party, it ...


2

You can think of it this way: 俺は、[(誰かが/お前が)(俺に)セミを取らせたら、]プロ級だぜ。 The basic structure of this sentence is 俺はプロ級だ. 取らせる, "make someone catch", is the causative form of 取る. The subject of 取らせる can be "(generic) you". The agent of the action 取る is 俺. (誰かが/お前が)(俺に)セミを取らせたら... Literally means "If someone/you make me catch cicadas, ..."


2

In the Japanese language, there isn't the difference between the "make" and "let" usage of causative verbs. We only judge it depending on the context. For, example, 私は、無理やり子供に野菜をたべさせた is translated as "I made my child eat vegetables (forcibly).", 私は、自由に子供にお菓子を食べさせた is translated as "I let my child eat sweets (freely)." ...


1

As is stated in the question, it seems to me that 注意を向けさせる and 注意を向ける are sometimes used interchangeably. But when preceded by(だれだれ)の, this makes their use more restricted shown in the following examples. ? 私は その美しい花に 彼女の注意を向けさせた。(sounds unnatural because of the causative verb 向けさせる) 私は その美しい花に 彼女の注意を向けた。(most natural in these four sentences) *私は 彼女に その美しい花に ...


1

After some more research, I have come across some interesting explanations. I'll link below the 2 webpages that helped me the most. https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/difference-between-su-ending-verb-and-causative.3239414/ https://maggiesensei.com/2009/10/24/%E3%81%95%E3%81%9B%E3%82%8B%E3%81%95%E3%81%9B%E3%82%89%E3%82%8C%E3%82%8B-saserusaserareru/ Well,...


1

In a view of Japanese, just "寂しくしない" means "Won't let/make myself lonely" and just "寂しくさせない" means "Won't let/make you lonely". Your context is "私はあなたを寂しくしない" = "I won't let/make you lonely". This is a usage of oral communication and not have sense of formal. In this context, it is same meaning of "私はあなたを寂しくさせない", but this is a usage of written ...


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