12

Technically, it exists, but as a Japanese-speaker, I would NOT recommend that you actively use it --- at least not on a regular basis. As @Chocolate stated in the comment above, 「~~させられうる」 is the form. Your sentence “It is possible that she may make you eat her cooking.” can be said in Japanese as: 「ボクは[彼女]{かのじょ}に[自分]{じぶん}の[料理]{りょうり}を[食]{た}べさせられうる。」 ...


11

子供を本を読ませる is ungrammatical, and you have to say 子供に本を読ませる. Here are the basic rules for causation: For verbs which take を, the agent (or "causee") is marked with に. Such verbs are usually transitive verbs, but some intransitive verbs take を, too. For verbs which don't take を (i.e., most intransitive verbs), the agent is marked with を. In your question, 読む ...


10

Using the terms from snailboat's link: Not [force doing] He didn't have me wash the dishes (but I washed them because I was bored). Similar to → He did not force me to wash the dishes. Force [not doing] He had me not wash the dishes (because I'm really clumsy). Similar to → He forced me to not wash the dishes. Verbs in the form 〜せなかった/〜せませんでした are ...


10

People learning Japanese get all caught up in polite language by twisting odd sounding honourific English to make it seem like it's at the same level of politeness as Japanese, like "I humble receive you allowing me to do that". From now on, think of いただきます as simply meaning "get" or "have" as in "getting someone to do something nice for you", because that's ...


9

First up I'll have to equate a few terms to avoid confusion. I'm going to equate your concept of "instigator" with "causer". And your concept of "agent" as "causee" (1) If I use 行く with another verb as its purpose, is を available to mark the agent? It seems like this should be the case since お弁当を should be connected to 行く。 Compare: [a] ...


9

…を幸せにする means “to make … happy.” させる is the causative form of する. Therefore: AがBを幸せにする: A makes B happy. XがAにBを幸せにさせる: X makes A make B happy. However, some people may confuse these two and say 幸せにさせる when they mean 幸せにする.


8

「かぐや様{さま}は告{こく}らせたい」 So, someone translated this to: "Kaguya-sama Wants to be Confessed To" Is that a literal translation? No, of course not, because while the original is in the causative format the TL is in the passive voice. The literal translation would be exactly as you said: "Kaguya-sama Wants to Make Me/Someone Confess". Is that a bad ...


7

I don't know what you mean by "-せる" form. -せる can appear at the end of the verb in at least two ways. As the potential form of a verb, which ends in -す. 帰す -> 帰せる As the causative form of a verb. 帰る -> 帰らせる Here, -せる is the potential form of the verb 倒す, so 倒す "to throw over, to knock down" 倒せる "to be able to throw over / knock down" 倒せない "not to ...


7

No, it is not correct, sorry to say. You literally created a "double causative" in: 「[食]{た}べさせることをさせないで」 But we would not use this structure in a natural setting. It sounds quite wordy and awkward. Most naturally, we would say something like: 「おばあさんに、子どもたちにオクラを食べさせないようにしてね( or しようね)。」 For more clarity, one could insert 「[無理]{むり}に」= "forcibly" and ...


7

As for 済ます and 済ませる, from my research it looks like the meaning of the two is equivalent. The せる in 済ませる denotes causation, the same as in 食べさせる or 話させる. The す in 済ます is the old form of せる, and is still sometimes used (opinion seems divided on where exactly. I would love to know if there's a specific region). Therefore 済ませる is now the common usage, where ...


7

Given just the sentence you propose: 父は弟に英語を習わせた。 You cannot tell whether this is meant to be permissive ("let") or forceful ("make"). What I've found is that when you see the causative (使役), you should assume that it is the forceful version unless context says otherwise. Also, there's a second way of saying it if they want to say "let": ...


7

The Tatoeba translation is a natural rather than a literal translation. Literally it's saying more like "I will have my sister go to the station by car to meet you". (迎える is a tricky little word that means to greet/meet someone, but often includes the implication of subsequently escorting them to their destination, so the "pick you up" element is also ...


6

Both 両親は私を医者にならせたがっています and 両親は私に医者になって欲しがっています are grammatically correct, but in practice, people don't say either. I'd recommend, as seafood258 says, 両親は私が医者になることを望んでいる or, if you ignore minor difference, …医者にならせたいようだ / …医者になってほしいようだ.


6

Direct translation of "He had me not wash the dishes." is, as you wrote "彼は私に皿を洗わせませんでした。". That is correct. But it's bit awkward for me, I real situation he stopped me to wash dishes because I wanted to wash. That was indicated, isn't it? For me "彼は私に皿を洗わせてくれませんでした。" sounds more natural.


6

構【かま】う (= "care about", "mind", "worry about") can be used in the forms of both "~に構う" (intransitively) and "~を構う" (transitively). For example, you can both say 「俺はお前に構っている暇がない」 and 「俺はお前を構っている暇がない」, and they're semantically the same! According to BCCWJ Corpus, "~に構う" is roughly three times more common than "~を構う". You seem to know how to make causative ...


6

You should note that the adverb よく has many meanings that include often, frequently. It doesn't always mean nicely, well, skillfully, etc. It all depends on context.


6

Your attempt is grammatically correct. To specify the target of 「させる」, we use the 「に」 particle. But your sentence can be improved a little more, so let me describe it. First, 「質問を聞く」 is a little bit unnatural. We say 「質問をする」 far more often. We use 「聞く」 with concrete question phrases, for example: 「どこに居るのか聞く」 (ask where you are). Then your sentence would ...


6

Historically, 「す/さす」 is older than 「せる/させる」. Just like many other pairs of older and newer words/phrases with the same meanings, the older forms are used more often and actively in Western Japan than in Eastern Japan. (That is if you know anything about Japanese history.) To say "What are you making me say?", for instance, Tokyoites would tend to say: ...


6

携帯電話を持っているのを忘れてしまうような人 can mean both "a person who is likely to forget the fact that he has a phone" and "a (fascinating) person who makes you forget about your phone". But no one wants to date such a forgetful person, so the latter should be the correct interpretation. Your attempt, 携帯電話を持っているのをついつい忘れさせてくれるような人と付き合いなさい is correct and "less ambiguous" in a ...


5

「[子供]{こども}に[話]{はなし}を[聞]{き}かせてあげました。」 Does this sentence seem natural to a native Japanese speaker? Yes, it is perfectly natural, correct, grammatical, etc. It has no problem whatsoever on any level. No one was forced to either tell or listen to a story, either. No stress or pressure on either party is implied in the sentence. It simply says that ...


5

It's a different way of saying the causative-passive 行かせられる, so it means that the speaker was made to go to the hospital. Note in an earlier version of this answer I confidently asserted that this is a more colloquial example. A comment was posted to the contrary and, after researching it more in depth, I was surprised to find I was indeed wrong in that ...


5

彼は罪のない若者を悪事に加担させるよう(に)そそのかしていた。 彼は罪のない若者を悪事に加担するよう(に)そそのかしていた。 I think these two sentences are equally natural, and are semantically the same. Many verbs such as たくらむ, 計画する, 準備する do not have causative meanings. In such cases, you always need the saseru-form to express the intended meaning. ○ 彼は罪のない若者を悪事に加担させるよう計画していた。 × 彼は罪のない若者を悪事に加担するよう計画していた。 For ...


5

考えさせられる小説 is a correct Japanese expression, and it indeed means "a novel that makes you think (deeply)." (Note that させる/させられる is not necessarily forcible. The use of "force" is too strong.) Technically speaking, 考えさせられる小説 can also mean "the novel that is made to think", but that's nonsense. Grammatically, this is an adverbial-head relative clause made from: ...


5

ほな、ひと足先に壕に行かしてもらうからね。 I think it's Kansai dialect. 「ほな」 is Kansai dialect, too. Here in Kyoto (and in Osaka and probably in Kobe as well), we often say: 行かせてもらう (in Standard Japanese) ⇒ 行かしてもらう (in Kansai-ben) 食べさせてもらう ⇒ 食べさしてもらう 言わせてもらう ⇒ 言わしてもらう 飲ませてもらう ⇒ 飲ましてもらう 見せて ⇒ 見して させて ⇒ さして やらせて ⇒ やらして etc. In Kansai dialect we often use the ...


4

「~~させ (causative verb form) + て + いただく」 expresses receiving the permission (or opportunity) to perform an action from another person. 「いただく」 = 「もらう」 in meaning. Former is only politer than the latter. 「[取]{と}らせていただいた」 means "I/We received the permission to take/collect ~~." One could also use as a translation "I/We had the pleasure of taking/...


4

The form The sentence, そうさせていただきます, is a typical example of use of 謙譲語{けんじょうご} (humble language). Translation Let's make the Speaker2's sentence a normal form. (Earlier step is politer.) Step 1. では、そうさせていただきます。 Step 2. では、そうさせてもらいます。 Step 3. では、そうします。 Step 4. なら、そうする。 So, these sentences can be translated like: Speaker1: You can go for a meal ...


4

Sometimes, one needs to take a statement by Tae Kim with a grain of salt. Kim probably knows better than 99.9 % of all Japanese-learners, but still he is not a native speaker. The short form is indeed used quite heavily in informal, daily conversations among us native speakers. The more informal the speech, the more often you will hear the short form. If,...


4

Does this help to illustrate the difference? "Unfortunate" タコに食べられた。 I was swallowed by an octopus. "Not so serious" タコを食べさせられた。 Someone made me eat octopus. "Unlikely" タコに食べさせられた。 An octopus (spoon-)fed me.


4

English vs Japanese causative English: I made him eat worms. Japanese: 私が彼に虫を食べさせた。 In other words: A makes B do V Vobj = A が B に Vobj を V させる The important part is that, in causative structure, what を attaches to is the object of the action, but not the causee (who is enforced). The causee is marked by に. Thus, the given passage should be ...


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