17

Adding -さん is definitely not conventional as a formal Japanese name card. But English-only name cards are not conventional in the first place, and hardly sticking to the traditional style may not be always good for a startup. Getting to know how to call each other is one of the difficult tasks in foreign communications. If I received a name card with ムルさん on ...


14

I feel that the expressions you listed include "super-polite" apologies which would be a bit too much in this situation. The professor would be surprised if you really used these heavy expressions. (And it would be more true considering the fact that he knows you're not a native speaker of Japanese.) Among those, 大変失礼いたしました is probably the safest, and you ...


12

代表取締役 (formal) or 社長 (informal) or 経営最高責任者 (translated from English) Chief Executive Officer 副社長 Vice President 専務 Senior Managing Director or Executive Director 常務 Managing Director 取締役 Member of the Board or Director 非常勤役員 Outside Director 本部長 General Manager 本部長代理 Acting General Manager 部長 Department Manager 次長 Associate Department Manager 副部長 Associate ...


10

According to デジタル大辞泉, the Agency for Cultural Affairs (文化庁) conducted a study on this topic and found that 69.2% of people used お疲れ様 to someone of a higher rank vs. 15.1% for ご苦労様. To someone of a lower rank, 53.4% used お疲れ様, vs. 36.1% for ご苦労様. So I would conclude from this that it is safe to use お疲れ様 to someone of a higher rank, whereas ご苦労様 should ...


9

ウイルス等が検出されませんでした sounds more like "No virus were detected", which is different from "Virus-free". The first thing I'd like to mention is that most sophisticated Japanese e-commerce sites do not say anything like this in their download pages, at least in a large font. To me, saying "virus free" loudly already smells like typical foreign sites (some of which ...


8

A phrase that hasn't been mentioned and may prove very useful would be とんでもないです。 とんでもないことでございます。 It's a polite way of saying "not at all". I think どういたしまして is polite, but somehow carries too much the nuance of "You're welcome" in that it accepts the fact that whoever is thanking you is correct in thanking you. とんでもない rejects the very ...


7

とのことです is a hearsay and a bit formal way. For example, your boss said Mike is working at 碑文谷警察署の本町二丁目交番. Then, your business partner asked you where Mike is working at? So you answered 碑文谷警察署の本町二丁目交番とのことです。 If you like to express it in common way, you can say Mikeは碑文谷警察署の本町二丁目交番で働いています。


7

That "department" is most commonly called 「[窓際部署]{まどぎわぶしょ}」 even though it is never an "official" department. The word 「[窓際]{まどぎわ}」 means "by the window" and it is used because the employees placed in the above mentioned "department" have little to do except looking out the window all day every day. Those employees, by the way, are commonly called 「窓際[族]{...


7

The sentence: 「[山田]{やまだ}さんがいらっしゃいますでしょうか。」 is definitely more than weird and it is nothing native speakers would say. The particle needs to be 「は」, and never 「が」. To ask if someone is in, the topic marker is always 「は」. Admittedly, though, using 「が」 to do so is a very common mistake among Japanese-learners. There is, however, a situation in which 「...


7

is いらっしゃいませ usually just said in a service-oriented environment (such as restaurants, hotels, and shops)? Yes, it is. I think it's not wrong in your office but a little weird. "お待ちしておりました。(Omachisiteorimasita)" may be best for this situation. It means like "We(I) have been waiting for you."


6

If you're really grateful for the offer, and you'd like to stay in touch with X会社, but you can't help but turning it down, then you can't be too polite. You could write something like this: 非常に魅力的なご提案をいただき、ありがとうございます。○○様に誘っていただいたことを大変光栄に思っています。 しかしながら、現在の職場でどうしても責任をもって終わらせたい仕事が残っているため、大変残念ですが、今回はご期待に沿うことができません。申し訳ございません。 今後も○○...


6

It is common for Japanese people to return a thank you rather than accepting the thank you for themselves and saying 'you're welcome'. Aさん: 「〇〇いただき、ありがとうございました。」 Bさん: 「いえいえ、こちらこそありがとうございました。」


6

申し伝えます is used when you are telling a customer, your boss or someone else above you (目上の人) that you will let your coworker know about something. Does it depend on Tanaka's position relative to me? Yes, if (s)he is of the same or lower rank then you, then 申し伝えます is correct, if (s)he is of higher rank than you, than 申し上げる would be correct. However, as ...


6

申し上げる has two different meanings. The first one is "to say" in a humble form, the second is "to do" also in a humble form. Here is an excerpt from a dictionary regarding the latter one: もうし‐あ・げる〔まうし‐〕【申(し)上げる】 「お」や「御 (ご) 」の付いた自分の行為を表す体言に付けて、その行為の対象を敬う。…してさしあげる。「お答え―・げます」「御相談―・げたく参上致しました」 Although the compound verb 申し上げる contains a 申す part related to "...


6

Using a word なし seems to be a common way in Japanese, if a company or a developer team provides this kind of information. For example, a Japanese webpage about a software called AOMEI Buckupper uses this expression. 100%クリーンのインストール: スパイウェアなし、アドウェアなし、ウィルスなし!ご安心ください。 In the English webpage of this, it says 100% Clean Installation: NO SPYWARE, NO ADWARE,...


6

退職金 is a flat amount of money you get when you retire as a thank you for your years of service and dedication to the company. It is separate from pensions and other sorts of remuneration and is basically just a hefty bonus. 年金 is the word used to refer to the pension system and, as a public service that one would have paid into over their lifetime, cannot be ...


6

Many companies have 三共 in their names. Of course the most famous one is 第一三共株式会社 (Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd), and this can be the only company name with 三共 which is recognized nationwide. But other large and small companies called 三共 exist; for example, this 株式会社三共 is apparently irrelevant to 第一三共, and there seems to be dozens of small 三共商店 in Japan. ...


6

[五月雨]{さみだれ}式ですみません (or more infrequently 五月雨式にすみません) is a fixed expression. Indeed, you can have 申し訳ありません as in your email to make it more polite. You can understand, 五月雨式で申し訳ありません as "sorry to bother you again". He might have sent you a lot of e-mails recently and he is apologizing for "spamming" you. 五月雨式に means "like the ceaseless pourings of May". ...


6

This is not uncommon in business settings. For one, 「田中はOKです。」 is easier to type and more concise than 「田中です。私はOKです。」. For one, they may be trying to be fair and businesslike. Using their own family names signals they are treating themselves the same way as other colleagues, from the third person's perspective. The person who says 田中の分 referring to himself ...


6

Shalaku is just (part of) a product name. In Japanese, it's シャ楽. Here's the official site of a successor product. Etymologically, this product name is probably a parody of Sharaku, an ukiyo-e designer, whose kanji (写楽) literally means "drawing/picture" (写) and "enjoyment/ease" (楽).


5

Why all the answerers, commentators and upvoters here are hung up only on the "dictionary" usages of the phrase, I have no idea. The answerers even seem to live in Japan. In today's Japan, the phrase is OFTEN used as a casual "Hi!" as well --- if someone wants to know the fact.


5

A natural way of asking that would be: 「ファイルのサイズを[教]{おし}えてください。」 If it is for business, one could say: 「ファイルのサイズをお教えいただけますか。」 The problem with 「サイズは[何]{なん}ですか?」 is that while it is a perfectly grammatical sentence, it sounds like it was "translated" from anothet language, which it was. When I read that part, it reminded me of the sentence 「[名前]{なまえ}...


5

仕事があるので大学にいます is grammatical but misleading. Without any further context, it sounds as if you were regularly employed by that college, and you had to be at the office of the college because you haven't finished the task for the day. If you are a visitor, and want to say "I was at a university today due to a job," some better ways to say it are: とある仕事の関係で、○○...


5

It would not be considered polite to use the suffix "-san" in a formal letter or a business email written in Japanese, so there is no reason to claim it would make an English phrase more polite. In written formal and business Japanese formal suffix さま or 様 (both -sama) would be used. I am a foreigner living in Japan and the only people who start English ...


5

ご担当者様 is the equivalent of "to someone it may concern". You can use it like this: Xセンター ご担当者様 お世話になっております、…… From a dictionary: 組織などに手紙や電子メールを送る際、対応する個人名が不明な場合に宛名として用いられる表現。「担当者さま」に丁寧の「ご」をつけた表現。


5

We often see the first or all letters being capitalized in western legal documents and agreement forms, or in the case of characterizing or emphasizing the subject in a statement in journalism. The example, "WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be signed" you suggested looks very odd, if it's done in an official Japanese ...


5

「X先生」を使うのが大丈夫ですか。 職場{しょくば}(大学{だいがく}内{ない})で、他{た}の教員{きょういん}に使{つか}う呼称{こしょう}と同{おな}じで構{かま}いません。 奥{おく}さん以外{いがい}の学内{がくない}の教員{きょういん}にメールで「***先生{せんせい}」と宛名{あてな}を書{か}くなら、奥{おく}さんにも「〇〇〇 先生{せんせい}」と書{か}いてください。 ところで、質問者{しつもん}と奥様{おくさま}は苗字{みょうじ}/名字{みょうじ}が同{おな}じでしょうから、質問者{しつもんしゃ}であるあなたと奥様{おくさま}とを職場{しょくば}で区別{くべつ}するために姓{せい}・名{めい}を書{か}く必要{ひつよう}があります。 日本{にほん}での一{ひと}つの習慣{...


5

I think まだまだです and そんなことはありません aren't casual but polite, and you can also say そんなことないです. You can use them to your boss. If my boss compliments me on excellent work, I just would say ありがとうございます(Thank you).


5

Let's say you're writing to a certain Mr. Tanaka Tarou, who's the representative director of the XYZ corporation. I would write the email on the following lines, where I put more than one example just to give you some ideas. 件名 - object: 【△△社】○○参考資料{さんこうしりょう}のご送付{そうふ} ○月○日のお打ち合わせのお礼 宛名 - Addressee: 株式会社{かぶしきがいしゃ}XYZ 代表取締役{だいひょうとりしまりやく} 田中太郎様 あいさつ文 - ...


5

後任 ("successor") refers to a person (i.e., a noun). So the simplest usage of this word is 私は彼の後任です, although this may look a little too blunt. Instead, you can say something like 来月よりXYZさんの後任として勤務致します. ~の代わりに is a very handy set phrase meaning "in place of ~" or "instead of ~", and you can say XYZさんの代わりに勤務致します. But this may imply your predecessor was ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible