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30 votes

the logic behind "te" in "chotto matte te"

ちょっと待ってて (chotto matte te) literally means "Keep waiting for a while (please)." That て (te) at the end does not mean "I'll be back shortly", at least grammatically. ちょっと (chotto) just means "for a ...
naruto's user avatar
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24 votes
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Why is a verb in the past (た形) contradicted with ~ていない?

@snailplane introduced this interesting article to me! 山下 好孝. テンスの「た」とアスペクトの「た」 (PDF) 初級日本語教科書では「~ましたか」の質問に対して,「~ていません」と答えるのを初級の学習者に導入する時は、「もう」と「まだ」を教える時である。(略) しかし、実際は、去年のことやもっと昔のことを開いても、「~ていません」「...
naruto's user avatar
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14 votes
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Ai oboete imasu ka, what does "imasu" add here?

A note on translation Expressing the same ideas in different languages inevitably results in all kinds of things that don't fit very well, if we try to look only at the individual words used in those ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
10 votes
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why they used -ていれば instead of -ば?

俺がもっと早く飛天を倒していれば… If only I had defeated Hiten much earlier... 俺がもっと早く飛天を倒せば… If I defeat Hiten much more quickly... ている here describes the continuation of state. See: When is Vている the ...
naruto's user avatar
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10 votes
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Must I use past tense before 後?

This た doesn't mean "past" but "completion". It isn't unnatural that た which means "completion" is used in things in the future. So 明日は、朝ご飯を食べた後、学校に行く is correct.
Yuuichi Tam's user avatar
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10 votes

Grammar and aspect of 「コーヒー飲んでき!」

Here in all of your examples, it's a contraction of 飲んでいき~ (飲んで行きい) in regional dialect mainly used in the Kansai area, meaning 飲んでいけ (飲んで + subsidiary verb 行け), or 飲んでいって(ちょうだい), literally "(Please) ...
chocolate's user avatar
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10 votes
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Are Japanese "tenses" aspects in disguise?

The real lie is in the assumption that the Japanese language is genetically related to Chinese. There is long cultural contact, and heavy lexical/morphological borrowing, but the underlying structures ...
Seralt's user avatar
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10 votes
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Usage and meaning : 寝ろ vs 寝てろ?

This type of いる is called a subsidiary verb, and what it means roughly depends on the context and the verb type. For details, see: When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the ...
naruto's user avatar
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8 votes

Intransitive verbs and ている

Short answer: Yes, it's a loose rule of thumb with many exceptions. Personally, I wouldn't even bother with memorizing that rule; it seems more trouble than it's worth. Long answer: Verbs in the -te ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
8 votes

Aspects in stylistics/meaning of 東雲

東雲【しののめ】 fell out of use many years ago, and it's marked as a 古語 (archaic word) in dictionaries. It's now mainly recognized as an uncommon proper noun (e.g., 東雲駅, list of fictional characters named ...
naruto's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why does 疲れた translate to the present tense

疲れる is not an unusual verbal, so there is no need to identify verbals like it. Rather, understanding how Japanese expressions tend to be expressions of changes of state will help with interpreting ...
karlalou's user avatar
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When is <verb stem>+かける's meaning to start and leave unfinished?

Unfortunately your first example doesn't tell the same meaning as your English. You have to say: ビールを飲んでみたことがあるんだけど、味が全然好きじゃなかった。 Plainly speaking, ~しかける has only one meaning: aborting before the ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
8 votes
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Difference between 感謝している and 感謝する

感謝する is "to thank", and 感謝している is "to have been thankful (since sometime in the past)" or "to be (always) thankful". Use 感謝します when someone just did something for you. Use 感謝しています when someone did ...
naruto's user avatar
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Why 忘れてる in「来週(明日)には忘れてる」?

I think the main difference lies in when the said action (instant-state-change verb, 忘れる in your case) can happen. 来週には○○する implies something will happen around or (shortly) before 来週 but not now, ...
naruto's user avatar
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8 votes

"私の彼女はチリ人で、 学生ビザを使って日本に来ています。" - Why is this "she CAME to Japan" and not "is coming..."?

I honestly dislike how the “ている” form is often taught as the progressive form. To be clear, this is a minor use compared to its more common use which is comparable to the perfect in English. I ...
Zorf's user avatar
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7 votes
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だんだん読めないようになった versus だんだん読めなくなってきた

A is less natural than B, because だんだん, which stands for a gradual change, doesn't really get along with なった, which is an instantaneous change. But it sounds like approximation of だんだん読めないようになっていった. ...
user4092's user avatar
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For 知る what is the difference between the simple present (知る) and 知っている forms?

知る means something more akin to "get to know". So by saying 電話番号を知ります you're saying that you "are getting to know something ", you don't know it yet. So if you're asking whether someone knows a ...
A.Ellett's user avatar
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7 votes

Are Japanese "tenses" aspects in disguise?

It is a bit controversial whether Japanese really has tenses or aspects, but it may be more correct to think of them as aspects, as Japanese tends to refer to changes in state. Either way, there are ...
weirdalsuperfan's user avatar
6 votes
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What does ていた mean?

ていた doesn't mean anything on itself, because it's a part of conjugation: 晴れる{はれる} - the verb - which means roughly "to become clear" (as in clear weather). 晴れて{はれて} - verb's te-form て+いる - a grammar ...
macraf's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the difference between Vてはじめる and はじめてV meaning?

[初]{はじ}めてする means I do for the first time. しはじめる means I start to do. しはじめる implies that you are doing that now. So, sentence 1 is "I drank coffee for the first time" and 2 is "I started to drink ...
Yuuichi Tam's user avatar
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the logic behind "te" in "chotto matte te"

(1) chyotto matte tte (2) why does the tte mean "... and I'll be back shortly". (1) ちょっと待{ま}ってって ↓ 「ちょっと待{ま}って」って ↓ 「ちょっと待って(ください)」って ↓ 「ちょっと待って(ください)」と ↓ 「ちょっと待って(ください)」と(私{わたし}が言{い}ってるのに、...
user20624's user avatar
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6 votes

Confused with verb form ( I am eating vs I was eating, vs I haven’t eaten (yet))

To form the past progressive form (was ~ing), just change the います/いる to the past tense. 食べています。 / 食べている。 I am eating (now). [present progressive] 食べていました。 / 食べていた。 I was eating (at that ...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes
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た particle usage in のど乾いた

The verb 乾く describes a change of state (to get dry) rather than a lasting state (to be dry). Therefore, when used in the present tense, it means such a change either happens usually, as opposed to at ...
aguijonazo's user avatar
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6 votes
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Why "We've worked" can't be in the past?

My understanding of the English "we have worked at [place] since [time]" is that it describes an ongoing period -- the speaker began working there at [time], and still works there. If the ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
5 votes

An additional て for some reason

~てた is an extremely common casual contraction of the past continuous ~ていた (in the same way that the present continuous ~ている is commonly contracted to ~てる). So the difference between お腹がすいた and ...
Ben Roffey's user avatar
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ている in continuous or perfect aspects

You have asked a very similar question before: Usage of ている in Punctual Verbs in Japanese and the Concept of Present Perfect in English Ultimately, this is something you have to gradually get used to. ...
naruto's user avatar
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5 votes

Function of ておく in 伝えておきます

I think of ておく as putting an action into place so that it する's (does its convenient effect) later. Additionally, you get it out of your mind. You proactively do it and get it out of your way. Maybe ...
0149234's user avatar
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