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Questions tagged [proverbs]

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What form is 急がば in 急がば回れ? [duplicate]

What form is this. how do you use it and is it only used for proverbs? The closest I know for the verb Isogu is Isoganai or Isogeba, but not Isogaba.
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1answer
73 views

About a proverb students have on their diaries

The students I have keep a diary. The two sentences below are written on those diaries. 小さな積み重ねが、大きな差となる Small stacking makes big difference. That English sounds awkward to me. It is ...
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2answers
646 views

What is the English proverb equivalent of 腹八分目{はらはちぶんめ}に[医者]{いしゃ}いらず and the history behind the proverb?

Context: I encountered this in a compulsory book about moral education for elementary school student by MEXT "私たちの道徳" Source My question: What is the best equivalent proverb in English of: ...
6
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1answer
209 views

痛い目にあう Is this literally meant to mean "You're gonna get a hurt/black eye?

Does the 目 mean 'eye' in this case? What does Au mean in this case? The pain and the 目 coming together to experience the hurt? Is this a one-off sentence or can I use other variations like 苦しい目にあう (...
3
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1answer
298 views

meaning and authenticity of Japanese proverb about shrimp and jellyfish

On this page, I see the following listed as a Japanese proverb: クラゲはエビと踊ることは決してありません 。 The jellyfish never dances with the shrimp. Meaning: Enmity is inborn and natural, it can never be eliminated. ...
3
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1answer
90 views

About 借りてきた猫 proverb

借りてきた猫 was translated as a borrowed cat. In that case, why 借りてきた is used instead of just 借りた猫? What additional meaning does it want to imply?
4
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2answers
157 views

寄らば from 寄らば大樹の陰

I have trouble understanding the 寄らば from: 寄{よ}らば大樹{たいじゅ}の陰{かげ}. I know it comes from 寄る (to approach/to come near). But how does it becomes 寄らば and what meaning it implies? The ば should be the ...
5
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3answers
2k views

What are the origins of the Japanese idiom ななころびやおき (nanakorobiyaoki)?

I have an assignment on this quote but I just can't seem to find any of the origins of the quote. Its' English translation is "Fall down seven times, stand up eight". If anybody could help and let me ...
4
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1answer
252 views

“Don't judge a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes”

What is the Japanese equivalent of "Don't judge a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes"?
7
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1answer
1k views

Looking for the proverb “Parents work hard, our life is so comfortable that children become beggar”

I heard the following proverb that was said from Japanese (if not Chinese). If our parents are working too hard, our life becomes very convenient up to a point that causes their grandchildren ...
5
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1answer
658 views

Understanding ただより高いものはない

「むかしっからなァ、ただより高いものはないっていうことわざがあるんだぞっ。」 From the old days there's a saying that "nothing costs as much as what is given to us". I've taken the translation of ただより高いものはない straight from the dictionary,...
6
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2answers
225 views

equivalent version of 'The daily grind'

I'm writing a composition about my daily routine & so clearly the content of the composition won't be particularly interesting. So I'd like to try and use a more creative title for the ...
1
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1answer
988 views

none of us is as smart as all of us

This proverb is attributed to an unknown Japanese author (http://thinkexist.com/quotation/none_of_us_are_as_smart_as_all_of/160488.html). However I could not find any mention of its actual origin. ...