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Questions tagged [possession]

所有. Possessive constructions with ある 'be/exist', いる 'be/exist', する 'do', and the lexical verbs 持つ 'hold/have' and 所有する 'possess'. These are sometimes divided by linguists into alienable and inalienable possession. Possessive constructions can be distinguished from existential and locative constructions, which have overlapping grammar.

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When can I get away with implying the の possessive?

I was reading the bible in Japanese a bit and came across this bit of Jonah 1: アミタイの子ヨナに、主から次のようなことばがありました。 Notice how the noun-phrase "Jonah son of Amittai" in the NIV became "アミタイの子ヨナ" in the ...
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Questions about possession phrases

I'm asking here since I didn't manage to find a definitive answer to my questions. 1. When should I use には and when は? The only thing I managed to find online is that は is used when a quantity is ...
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Having trouble parsing out 「私は今までの私ではない」

I've been struggling with the possessive and the statement of existence in the following phrase: 私は今までの私ではない The easy part is "I am until now"...but then I get stuck on 「の私ではない」. By itself, I ...
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彼女には心配事がない。why there is に?

彼女には心配事がない。 What is this ni in this phrase?
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目をした - why is the verb する used instead of ある? [duplicate]

i'm reading ekuni kaori's duke and when decribing the dog she says: グレーの目をした and I was wodnering why it wasn't グレーの目があった is the second second sentence correct as well or do do they have different ...
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Differences between が and の [duplicate]

What is the difference between these two sentences? 私が食べたレモン。 私の食べたレモン。
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Why isn't the verb “to have” common in Japanese and how do people phrase things without using it?

In any previous language I have studied (mostly European languages), the verb "to have" is always one of the top 5 most common verbs alongside others like to be, to go, to come, etc. In Japanese, this ...
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How do you differentiate between “I have” and “There is”?

My confusion surfaced when I came across a song named 「君がいるから」which I could either interpret as "Because you are mine." or "Because you are here." Is there a different way to say "You are mine" in ...
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Is there any difference between ~~をする and ~が~

I came across this sentence (from the Core 1000 material of iknow) while learning vocabulary: 彼女は青い目をしています。 She has blue eyes. Doing some searching I found this answer explaining that ~をする can ...
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How do i use ある/いる?

Up to now I've come to understand the meaning of these verbs. I understand when you are saying something exists somewhere you use the particle に to indicate where it exists, or someone having ...
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why は and not の?

in the following sentence why は particle is used? Could I also use の in this sentence? Thanks. 彼は歯が白い.
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Do possessive pronouns exist at all in Japanese or the only way to refer to possession is through the “no” particle?

In English or Spanish there are possessive pronouns like my, your, her, his, mi, tu, su, etc. that you can use to show possession. For example, my car. But in Japanese the only way I've seen (or that ...
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possessive の with a verb [duplicate]

I was having a discussion with someone over the sentence 私の作った絵を使った! (He) used the drawing I made I have never seen the possessive の being used as NOUN + の + VERB (only N+の+N) so I insisted the ...
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What is the basic underlying idea of ~がある?

As the time goes, I find so many grammars in Japanese end with ~がある. For example, ~ことがある ~必要がある ~傾向がある ~可能性がある I know the ~がある means "there is" and they are so powerful. However, what I don't quite ...
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「が」vs「の」 with possessives

I know that the normal possessive form is usually formed subject+「の」+object. Though, in one instance, I found が being used in 天は我が物. I know that 「が」 can be used to express possession, though is there ...
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興味を持っている vs 興味がある

Is there a difference between 興味を持っている and 興味がある? With physical objects I understand how the latter is more passive, but what about for abstract nouns like 興味? For example in the sentence 片岡さんは、...
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Confusing use of possessive の

This is embarrassingly basic. I've been using の happily for the last year and then I read this sentence and made the mistake of stopping to think about it: ポケットからきれいな包みのアメ玉を取り出した。 He took a ...
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How do you say (someone) has (object)?

Basically I'm going through the が ある / が いる grammar - is it okay to say (person) に (object) が ある/いる?, e.g. Michiko-san に お金 が あります (Michio san has money) I guess I'm using it like you might say (...
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Trying to understand the use of が as の

Many times I come across sentences that uses が instead of の to indicate possessiveness. Example: 彼が車 instead of 彼の車. The dictionary says that が can also "indicate possessive (esp. in literary ...
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correct usage of 'There be …' construction and 'somebody has something'

How do I express the meaning of "somebody has something" in Japanese? In English the 'there be...' construction means something exists somewhere, which equals the Japanese 〜〜があります or 〜〜がいます. For ...
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Use of する to describe one's colour

From Japanesepod101: 象は灰色をしている。 The elephant is gray. The meaning of the sentence is not in doubt but I've been trying to figure how する is being used here. Checking a dictionary, definition ...
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ある or 持つ, what's the difference?

My textbook says ある can be used for possession, but further on it says 持っている is used for possession. Are both correct? Are there any differences? When talking with a Japanese friend (in very ...