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Questions tagged [linguistics]

言語学. The study of languages.

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0answers
64 views

Sleeping verbs and まで vs までに

So I was wondering, pretty much all of the sleep related verbs switch meaning with まで and までに. Was it always like that? Or was there a time when 8時まで寝る meant "going to bed at 8"? Or take the even ...
6
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1answer
138 views

How is readability measured in Japanese?

First of all, I apologize if this question is better suited for the meta. It's a little theoretical, but it's also very much about the Japanese language, so I figured it was fine here. I was looking ...
2
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2answers
106 views

Terminology for leaving out parts of words

In Japanese some parts of words or letters often get left out in order to shorten them, but what is this phenomenon called? Does anyone know? Do you know the English terminology? The Japanese ...
3
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0answers
233 views

Word lists/sources for pitch accent in Middle Japanese

Is there anywhere I can find a list of words and what their reconstructed pitches were in Middle Japanese? Or especially what words we have tone dot information on (with a preference for the oldest ...
0
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2answers
137 views

Does using 「だ」in だと思う actually serve a practical purpose?

I know it's to indicate whether something is a Na adjective or not, but other than the language rules stating it to be so, is there any real use of it? I'm pretty sure everyone would understand you ...
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1answer
306 views

How do the Japanese ask questions about language? [closed]

In Japanese class, when you are confused about vocab or grammar or sentence structure, you ask the professor in English. But if you live in Japan and are communicating with Japanese natives who barely ...
1
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1answer
108 views

一段動詞が五段動詞に進化できますか?

日本語の文法では五段動詞の方が一段動詞より多いです。文法が変化すると、一段動詞が五段動詞に変化する可能性がありますか? 私は日本語を練習したいです。上手くなければすみません。
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2answers
1k views

the different adverbia between 'mousugu', 'mamonaku', and sorosoro

what the different meaning between 'mousugu', 'mamonaku', and sorosoro, in english means 'soon' ?
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2answers
343 views

Analyzing breakdown of jukugo

I may just be misunderstanding the etymology of certain words, but I think of certain jukugo e.g. 「大学生」as being derived from patterns like 「大学の学生」, where there is a kanji-level shiritori, leading to a ...
2
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1answer
138 views

Comparing the “severity” of words of amount, degree, etc

I'm looking for lists of words/phrases of degree, ordered by how strong they are relative to each other. For an example in English, I ran across this research recently: http://www.businessinsider....
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2answers
2k views

Rules and phenomena about reading/writing words with kanji

I'm trying to learn Japanese but I'm the kind of person who can't really learn if they don't understand some of the mechanisms. I'm stuck when learning vocabulary because I can't just be like "OK this ...
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2answers
143 views

Why are English loanwords so much more popular than Chinese ones?

While I get that Chinese-Japanese relations are complicated, American-Japanese relations are as well; given how Chinese jargon and terms of art are available, why is it that English terms are so often ...
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3answers
4k views

Expressing difference between “fluent” and “native speaker” in Japanese

I want to explain the difference between the English linguistic terms "fluent" and "native speaker". I could do this in English, but I'd also like to know if it's possible to do so in Japanese. To be ...
3
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1answer
164 views

Can compound words like 「外食」be considered as a morpheme?

According to Wikipedia, In linguistics, a morpheme is the smallest grammatical unit in a language. In other words, it is the smallest meaningful unit of a language. By that definition, do you ...
6
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2answers
395 views

How many possible phonological forms could be represented by a randomly chosen single character?

In Chinese, every character is monosyllabic and Mandarin has a total of about ~1200 licit syllables including tone (about 400 if you don't count tone). This means that if I take any Chinese character ...
6
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1answer
144 views

How do you call different methods for writing numbers (notations)?

Are there proper terms for the methods of writing numbers in kanji (literal vs powers-of-10)? 千五百三十六 vs 一五三六 If not (or the terms are too scientific) how to differentiate between them in ...
7
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1answer
322 views

Is modern day keigo borrowed from kansai-ben? Sources?

I have heard on various occasions that modern day keigo was borrowed from Kansai-ben. It states this on Wikipedia: Historically, extensive use of keigo (honorific speech) was a feature of Kansai-...
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1answer
1k views

Difference between 「にかかわらず」 and 「にもかかわらず」

I would like to know the difference between 「にかかわらず」 and 「にもかかわらず」 with regard to the semantics of the predicate-argument relation. Do they express the same semantic relation (non-causality?)? or ...
8
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1answer
358 views

The genesis of pitch accent in Japanese

There is a significant amount of research relating to tonogenesis -- the mechanisms by which a toneless parent language develops tone. But what about the genesis of pitch accent? For instance, the ...
1
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1answer
100 views

Is the particle を in をでる comparable to elative case?

I remember that Estonian has multiple grammatical cases marking some kind of location. I recently learned that the particle を can be used to mean something like "out of" or "from", for an action that ...
6
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4answers
731 views

Please teach me more about ハダカ格

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agent_(grammar): In certain languages, the agent is declined or otherwise marked to indicate its grammatical role. In Japanese, for instance, the agentive case ...
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3answers
2k views

How were hiragana/katakana influenced by syllabary writing systems?

Today, I was in English class, and I learned about language families and then writing systems. Of course, there is kanji, and ideographic system, but hiragana and katakana are both syllabary systems. ...
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1answer
199 views

Are there words or phrases that are commonly mistyped by native speakers on the Internet?

Like how it is common to see their/there and "could/would/should of" instead of "could/would/should have" in English discussions.
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1answer
719 views

How should we understand the plain form when used in novels set in the past?

I am trying to understand how the plain form is used in novels set in the past through the explanations in the paper referenced below. I wonder if someone could explain how we should understand the ...
6
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3answers
5k views

Is there any merit to the claim that Japanese and Tamil are genetically related languages?

In India, regional nationalism is strongly tied to language. This is particularly the case in the Dravidian-speaking south, especially among speakers of Tamil - Tamil nationalists trot out all manner ...
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2answers
581 views

Nouns exhibiting vowel fronting

As touched upon in another thread, there are several nouns that exhibit a kind of vowel shift in older forms, where the ending vowel is fronted when the noun is used on its own to become /i/ or /e/, ...
5
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0answers
122 views

What do we know about the phonetic distinctions between the 甲類 and 乙類 syllables in 上代特殊仮名遣い? [closed]

上代特殊仮名遣い【じょうだいとくしゅかなづかい】 is a Nara-period practice in which two distinct versions of certain syllables (called 甲類【こうるい】 and 乙類【おつるい】, and denoted by subscript 1 and 2 in Latin script) were ...
2
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2answers
350 views

Can 「食べも飲みもしない」 be rewritten as 「食べなくも飲まなくもある」?

I'd like to see if I understand a couple grammar points correctly. I'd like to rewrite this sentence:  1. 食べも飲みもしない As either one of these:  2a. 食べなくも  飲まなくもある  2b. ...
9
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5answers
855 views

Does Japanese have any infixes?

In English, we have prefixes, like "pre-"; suffixes, like "-ize"; and arguably, expletives that function as infixes (one classic example is "abso-fucking-lutely"). In Japanese, we also have prefixes,...
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2answers
671 views

Which verb receives a negation in a Japanese sentence?

I can say 歩いて渡る which translates to "to cross by walking". However, if I would like to say "I am not going to cross by walking, but by some other means", would I say 歩かないで渡る or 歩いて渡らない? There are ...
7
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2answers
852 views

Does Japanese have morphemes that span two kanji?

I read once (in this comment by Victor Mair on Language Log) that Chinese has single morphemes that span two hanzi. The example given was the Chinese word pútáo 葡萄. At the time, I assumed it applied ...
4
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1answer
939 views

When should I use あそこで / そこで?

I have the sentence from 合格できる、日本語能力試験N2: 私は外国旅行をするたび、「 」専門の勉強をしている日本人の若い学者に会うと、思いがけない収穫をえる。 The choices for the blank are A)あそこで B)そこで C)ここで D)どこかで I narrowed it down to either A or B, but then ...
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7answers
2k views

Linguistics and Japanese study

Firstly, I apologise if this has been asked before or if I have asked this in the wrong place (should I have asked on the meta site?). I've studied Japanese for (going on) 5 years, now. It's been ...
7
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1answer
280 views

動作 as opposed to 作用

The linguistics text I’m reading has a sentence with this fragment: 「動詞の表す動作・作用が[…]」。 Consulting dictionaries just made me more confused; what’s the contrast between the two in this context? “Action” ...
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3answers
3k views

Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels

Descriptions of Japanese phonology (such as Wikipedia's) usually describe high vowels between voiceless consonants (or word-finally) as "devoiced". For example, the pronunciation of ⟨圧⟩ 'pressure' and ...
7
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2answers
3k views

Is there a study available on the similarities between Japanese and Turkish grammars?

No I'm not claiming the Altaic hypothesis so try not to bring that up in answers. Still there are grammatical similarities between Japanese and Turkish such as agglutination and use of postpositions ...
22
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4answers
8k views

Is Japanese really an agglutinative language?

In the linguistics topic of language typology, Japanese is often included in lists of agglutinative (or agglutinating) languages, but when learning or reading about Japanese grammar exclusively this ...
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2answers
9k views

Why does Japanese have two kinds of adjectives? (-i adjectives and -na adjectives)

Japanese has two kinds of adjectives known by several terms but the ones I know are i-adjectives and na-adjectives - why? I recall that Japanese adjectives are much more like verbs than in English ...