Questions tagged [conditionals]

条件表現. Also known as if-then constructions. In Japanese conditionals are expressed with one of と, ~(れ)ば, ~たら, なら(ば).

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Is it grammatically correct to use もし and/or 〜ば form along with the 〜たい form to convey desire in a conditional clause?

My impression when using conditionals, most of the time, you lose the ability to express desire. For example, when conjugating to -たら、you have to use the past tense of the verb. Is it grammatically ...
3
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~ば vs ~ていれば in counterfactual conditionals

In l'électeur's answer here, he claims (with such confidence that he bolds the belief) that the correct way to say the English sentence "If I had turned right back then, I wonder what would have ...
3
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What does conditional たら add to 未然形+う+とする?

Do the following sentences differ in meaning? I understand that conditional たら adds the meaning of simultaneous action, but does the meaning of the sentence really change without たら? 寝ようとした、...
3
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Is ないとダメ a stronger “must” than なければダメ?

I learned that one way to form a "must" sentence is "negative verb + conditional + ダメ・ならない・いけない": I mainly see two kinds of conditional used - the 仮定形 and と. For example 食べないとダメだ。 ...
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How can I use the conditional ~ば and desiderative ~たい together?

I think the title is self-explanatory. I've been wondering how to combine the desiderative (たい) and the conditional (えば/たら). For example, if I want to say "Excuse me, what should I do if I want to ...
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Connotations of なら vs たら in conditional clauses

I am wondering about the choice of, and general necessity of, なら in the following sentence. ドイツでは、ウイルスがうつらないように気をつけているなら、店を開くことができます。(from NHK Easy) * In Germany, businesses may remain open if they ...
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Difference between しゃべんだったら and しゃべったら?

I’ve stumbled upon the sentence しゃべんだったら, which was translated as “if you are talking”. I get it’s the past conditional, but then why wouldn’t you say しゃべったら or like why does it say んだった?