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From The Quintessential Quintuplets

1 - S01E01

See here 2:36 - 2:44. The imouto Raiha Uesugi of the male protagonist Fuutarou Uesugi says 'うそうそ' (uso uso).

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In the manga:

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2 - In S02E06

Fuutarou ('Uesugi-kun') says to h employer 'Oh, boss, you're so funny' when the employer offers a buffet to another character/s. The word used here is 冗談 (じょうだん jōdan / joudan).

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In the manga

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Questions:

  1. What's the difference?

  2. Also, in particular what does it mean to use 'uso' here? Like, what's the lie? Some people in fact can live on 1 kidney. I actually kinda think they should be reversed: Raiha is joking that Fuutarou should give up a kidney, while the boss is lying that Fuutarou will be forced to pay the for the buffet.

  • Edit: Ok Arie says 'then proceeds to explain why the previous statement was actually a lie.' I checked the manga and apparently they do cut out dialogue in the anime adaptation. Here's full remainder of the conversation up to the stomach grumble:

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Raiha: (This part is in the anime.)

うそうそ

Raiha: (This part is NOT in the anime.)

成績悪くて困ってるって言ってたよ

でもお兄ちゃんならできるってしんじてる!

Fuutarou: (This part is NOT in the anime.)

ちょっとまって

やるなんて一言も

Raiha: (This part is in the anime.)

これでお腹いっぱい食べられるようになるね!

Translation:

enter image description here

Ok so how is that an explanation of why the previous statement was a lie?

1 Answer 1

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I think it's about the original context here rather than how the meaning translates to English.

From the pictures:

In the 1st scene, the character says うそうそ (something like: "lying, lying") then proceeds to explain why the previous statement was actually a lie.

In the 2nd scene, ばかり caries the meaning of abundance of something ("nothing but"), something like: when it comes to you, boss, it's "noting but jokes".

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  • Thanks Arie. 1 - For the 1st scene, I totally missed that the anime cut out some of their dialogue. Edited post to add their dialogue. 1A - How is the 'lie' explained please? 1B - And more important what is the lie? 2 - For the 2nd scene, well ok...what's the problem if the uso uso and joudan are reversed please? I really don't see any lie in the 1st scene, yet I see clear lies in the 2nd scene...
    – BCLC
    Feb 6, 2023 at 11:20
  • @BCLC sorry about the 1st. I misread the context and one of the kanji on the picture. I think you can actually use 冗談だった i the 1st example, but the nuance will change a bit (from "I just lied to you and you believed me, haha" to "Easy there, I was joking"). Small change but a change. I don't think you can use うそうそ in the 2nd tho. The guy isn't talking directly about what his boss said but about his boss's personality. A sarcastic "It's nothing but jokes with you" can't be easily changed to "you're lying" in this context.
    – Arie
    Feb 6, 2023 at 13:49

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