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The full sentence is 「いたずらがしたくなったのです」

Is したく the く-form of したい + なる in which case the sentence would mean "he grew wanting to play some frolics"?

Or is したく the hiragana of 支度 in which case the sentence would mean "Some pranks were prepared"?

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    支度なる makes no sense.
    – aguijonazo
    Commented Nov 4, 2022 at 13:00
  • @aguijonazo ok but if it was したい, shouldn't the sentence be 「いたずらをしたくなった」?
    – vdegenne
    Commented Nov 4, 2022 at 13:32

1 Answer 1

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This is probably just したく+なる (your first guess). Addressing your comment in the question,

ok but if it was したい, shouldn't the sentence be 「いたずらをしたくなった」?

when using the たい construction, both particles を and が can be used. See this and this Q&A entries to know more about the different nuance for each case. According to this article, at the section "Advanced Topic: を (Direct Object) VS. が (Object of Emotion)":

[For the construction Vたい] when the particle を points out direct objects, you can replace it with the particle が. The meanings are the same, but there are some cases where you need to use a particular particle. Be careful; if the particle を has a different function, the replacement doesn’t work. For example, with this sentence: 公園{こうえん}を歩{ある}きたいです (I want to walk at the park), the を points out locations to pass.

漢字を勉強したい(です)。 [I] want to study kanji.

漢字が勉強したい(です)。 [I] want to study kanji.

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  • Aah ok That's why I was confused, It's like ほしい they are both I-adjective, so that makes sense to use が here. That's one confusing thing about Japanese language. Thanks a lot to make me understand!
    – vdegenne
    Commented Nov 4, 2022 at 14:25
  • Yes, if you think of Vたい as a transformation of a verb into an i-adjective, it helps to click in.
    – jarmanso7
    Commented Nov 4, 2022 at 14:31

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