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At 2m56s of Death Note, a crime reporter says the following:

本日、午前十一時頃 神奈川県横浜市のアパートで、 30前後と見られ男性が、血まみれで死亡しているところとが見つかれ

which is translated to English as

At around 11 o'clock today, in the city of Yokohama, Kanagawa prefecture, a thirty year old man was found covered in blood at his apartment.

Though I think I understand what all of the words mean, I'm having considerable trouble understanding this sentence grammatically.

  1. The sentence is translated into English as having the passive past tense "a man...was found". But none of the verbs in this sentence are in the past tense?

30前後と見られ男性が

I assume this phrase literally means something like: "believed-to-be around 30 (years of age) man".

  1. Why is と見られ being used in its stem form here? Does the stem form somehow convert a verb into an adjective?
  2. Why is the verb before 男性, instead of at the end of the clause? (I thought verbs always go at the end of clauses?)

血まみれで死亡しているところとが

  1. Is the と particle at the end of this being used as a quote particle (with 見つかれ)?
  2. What is the function of ところ? Is it modifying "死亡している" to mean "are dead at the spot", or is it modifying "見つかれ" to mean "were found at the spot"?

見つかれ

  1. Why is the ending verb in the imperative? This wouldn't be natural in English, since it sounds like its commanding the listener to find something, rather than reporting that something was found by other people.

NOTE: There is another question posted about this sentence, but is asking about different components of the sentence than I am.

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    They are typos?
    – Jimmy Yang
    Aug 6 at 18:21
  • I think you're mishearing it and the subtitles may be wrong, though I had to check it out on another site because I couldn't get this one to work so I'm not sure. There's definitely another sound between 見られ and 男性 (る is the logical option), and she says 見つかり at the end, not 見つかれ
    – Angelos
    Aug 6 at 19:15
  • ところとが -- The audio says ところが.
    – Chocolate
    Aug 7 at 0:53

1 Answer 1

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The Japanese subs are full of small typos. I found at least 9 errors in the first 5 minutes of the video alone, and it's hard to believe a native Japanese speaker did this. I recommend not using them as your learning material. In particular, the part you quoted contains as many as 4 errors.

Wrong:

本日、午前十一時頃、神奈川横浜市のアパートで、30前後と見られ男性が、血まみれで死亡しているところが見つか、…

Correct:

本日、午前十一時頃、神奈川横浜市のアパートで、30前後と見られ男性が、血まみれで死亡しているところが見つか、…


  1. The sentence is translated into English as having the passive past tense "a man...was found". But none of the verbs in this sentence are in the past tense?

In Japanese, the past tense is expected only at the end of a compound sentence (e.g., "朝食を食べ学校に行きました" = "I ate breakfast and went to school"). The final part of this sentence, which should be in the past tense, has been cut out. The final part would be something like 警察が捜査を始めました.

  1. Why is と見られ being used in its stem form here? Does the stem form somehow convert a verb into an adjective?

It's a typo. It must have been 見られる.

  1. Why is the verb before 男性, instead of at the end of the clause? (I thought verbs always go at the end of clauses?)

It's a simple example of relative clauses. 見られる is at the end of a relative clause 30前後と見られる which modifies 男性. 30前後と見られる男 = "a man who appears as being around 30".

  1. Is the と particle at the end of this being used as a quote particle (with 見つかれ)?

30前後 is not a sentence but a noun phrase, so it's a と described here. This type of と roughly corresponds to English 'as'.

  1. What is the function of ところ? Is it modifying "死亡している" to mean "are dead at the spot", or is it modifying "見つかれ" to mean "were found at the spot"?

It's not that ところ is not modifying 死亡している, but that 死亡している is modifying ところ. Remember that Japanese is strictly head-final, i.e., a phrase never modifies a phrase that comes before. For the meaning of this ところ, see this.

  1. Why is the ending verb in the imperative?

It's a typo, it must have been 見つかり.

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