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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxasEvdWGxo&t=0m30s

This is a sentence in a promotional video for an upcoming game.

Narrator: このゲームはクエストが満を持して贈るシミュレーションRPG!

Google translate gives: This game is a simulation RPG presented by Quest!

But, removing the [満を持して] part, google still gives the same translation: This game is a simulation RPG presented by Quest!

On another website, 満を持して is given as: wait for the right moment; wait until the perfect timing

So what gives?

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    I think it's a mistake to expect Google Translate to give you consistent and interpretable results that use every part of the source text.
    – jogloran
    Jun 9 at 23:19
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    Google Translate -- and, indeed, all machine translators -- are black-box systems. Not even the programmers really quite know what goes on inside them. We've had MT systems provide wildly different results, depending on the number of whitespaces occurring at the end of the input string. Do not trust Google Translate. ← This has been your Public Service Announcement. Have a nice day! 😄 Jun 10 at 0:39
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    DeepL gives three different translations when there is (1) a period, (2) an exclamation mark, and (3) nothing at the end of the sentence. Google Translate also gives a different translation when you remove the exclamation mark for some reason.
    – aguijonazo
    Jun 10 at 1:11

1 Answer 1

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満を持して in this context (a promotional material) means that the company has spent a lot of time and effort in manufacturing the product, brushing up its quality, and keeping it up until the right time has come to deliver it to the market. It is a form of 満を持す.

Personally, I think it is a bit of a cliche, carries a sense of vanity, and ultimately means little. You wouldn't lose much in reading Xが満を持してYを贈る as just "X presents Y". So I think Google Translate is somewhat justified to omit the part in this case.

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    FWIW I don't think it'd terribly hurt either to translate it as "X is proud to present..." Jun 10 at 11:29

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