1

why the translation does not have "to decide on" ?

what does にする actually mean?

what is the difference between 私は明日と来週の火曜日を休みにする and 私は明日と来週の火曜日休みを決める?

決める;to decide; to choose; to determine; to make up one's mind; to resolve; to set one's heart on; to settle; to arrange; to set; to appoint; to fix enter image description here

3

1 Answer 1

5

A more literal translation would be something like:

I will turn tomorrow and next Tuesday into days off.

This, of course, doesn’t refer to any process during which those days are transformed into something else. You just treat them as your days off.

If you say this as a declaration when you have just made up your mind to take those days off, it may be more naturally translated using the English verb “decide.”

I have (just) decided to take tomorrow and next Tuesday off.

私は明日と来週の火曜日(に)休みを決める would be understood as meaning that you will decide when to take a day off or vacation on the specified dates. Your vacation, to be decided tomorrow and next Tuesday, might be months away.

If you want to make a similar declaration to the first using the verb 決める, you will still use する.

私は明日と来週の火曜日を休みにすることに決めた。
I have (just) decided on taking tomorrow and next Tuesday off.

こと, as a nominalizer, roughly corresponds to the “-ing” suffix of the gerund “taking.”

The verb 決める must be used in the past tense here because the present form would be understood as referring to a future action (of deciding).


[EDIT]

I don’t mean to confuse you, but you can also say:

私は明日と来週の火曜日を休みにすることにした。

This final した is very similar in meaning to 決めた.

2
  • How do the sentence with just にする, and that with にすることに決めた, differ in meaning?
    – Mauro
    Nov 1, 2021 at 12:06
  • 1
    @Mauro - I would say the version with 決めた puts more focus on the fact that you decided what you did, whereas the one with にする focuses more on what you are going to do. However, the sentence I have just added in the edit is very close to the one with 決めた.
    – aguijonazo
    Nov 1, 2021 at 12:33

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .