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I came across this sentence:

そういえばさ、ここら辺に出るって噂のところがあるらしいじゃん? 行ってみない?

I'm not so sure about the って usage in the 出るって part, so I checked the dictionary and found out that って can also indicate a conditional clause, but I'm still not so sure because other than in the dictionary I can't seem to find the source for that usage anywhere else. So in this sentence, does it mean "about going around here" or "if I/we/you go around here"? Of course the second makes way more sense but I can never be sure of it.

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  • I got it now the problem is actually not the って but the verb 出る. I originally thought the 出る action was intended for the people in question but now that I just checked the dictionary and found out that 出る can also mean "to be found" or "to emerge" and that just explains everything as it is clearly referring to the 噂のところ.
    – Huân Bùi
    Aug 12, 2021 at 8:00
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    Took me a while to figure out why you would think the って might express conditional, but I now think that you may have thought of the 「verb in た/だ + って」 construction, which is indeed conditional. Related: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/15272/…
    – user4032
    Aug 12, 2021 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

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そういえばさ、ここら辺に出るって噂のところがあるらしいじゃん?

You can parse it as:

ここら辺に(「出る」って噂の)ところがある

Its basic structure is:

ここら辺に、XXがある -- "There's XX around here"

出る in 「出る」って噂のところ most likely means 幽霊が出る, "ghosts appear". The って is a colloquial version of という.
So 出るって噂のところ can be rephrased as 「幽霊が出る」という噂の場所, lit. "a place rumored that ghosts appear" → "a place that's rumored to be haunted"

So the sentence means:

"By the way, I hear that there's a place rumored to be haunted around here."

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As is pointed out in the comments, this て is not related to the gramatical て-form (て形 in some textbooks) for verbs or adjectives (like 食べて,行って, etc.), which is used in a lot of gramatical forms like ~てください,~てから,~ている, etc.

This is just an informal way of saying 「と言う」or 「と」or to repeat what someone said. Here are some examples I just found.

(1) A: ねねここ行かない? B: ここってどこ?

(2) A: 困ったなぁ,どうしよう? B: どうしようって,どうしようもないでしょう?

(3) この説明書は読みにくいな.「線に沿って紙を切ってください」って書いてあるけど,どこにも線が見当たらないんだよね.なんだよって感じだよね...

Edit: I write what it's on the comments below to improve the answer.

About the translation of the phrase, since I don't know the context (and the japanese language depends a lot on the context), I don't know if this interpretation is correct or not, but I would say that they are talking about something that "appears" or that "emerges" or "can be seen" in some place. For example, let's say that they are talking about bears. The phrase can be translated as "By the way, it seems that there is a place in this area where bears (or whatever) appear/come up, isn't it? Should we go?
The part 「ここら辺に出るって噂のところ」just refers to the place where there is a rumour that says that bears (or whatever) "appear", and the part 「ここら辺に出る」(they appear here) just before the って is used to characterize the noun 「噂のところ」(so-called place, or the place of the rumour). The て is just used as という to characterize that group of nouns 「噂のところ」

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  • Oh I got it now the problem is actually not the って but the verb 出る. I originally thought the 出る action was intended for the people in question but now that I just checked the dictionary and found out that 出る can also mean "to be found" or "to emerge" and that just explains everything as it is clearly referring to the 噂のところ.
    – Huân Bùi
    Aug 12, 2021 at 8:00
  • I see. Since I don't know the context (and the japanese language depends a lot on the context), I don't know if this interpretation is correct or not, but I would say that they are talking about something that "appears" or that "emerges" or "can be seen" in some place. For example, let's say that they are talking about bears. The phrase can be translated as "By the way, it seems that there is a place in this area where bears (or whatever) appear/come up, isn't it? Should we go? The part 「ここら辺に出るって噂のところ」just refer to the place where there is a rumour that says that bears (or whatever) "appear" Aug 12, 2021 at 8:25
  • And the part 「ここら辺に出る」(they appear here) just before the って is used to characterize the noun 「噂のところ」(so-called place, or the place of the rumour). The て is just used as という to characterize that group of nouns 「噂のところ」 Aug 12, 2021 at 8:27
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    The 出る here means most probably means There appear ghosts (or anything monstrous). It might depends, but it is hard to think otherwise.
    – sundowner
    Aug 12, 2021 at 9:42
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    Could ここら辺に link with ある rather than 出る? And could 出るって characterize 噂 rather than 噂のところ ?
    – Axe
    Jan 13 at 12:46

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