2

Let's take the following examples:

  • 1(a). 子供の頃から、ずっとパリに行きたかった
  • 1(b). 子供の頃から、ずっとパリに行くのが夢でした
  • 2(a). 子供の頃から、パリに行きたかった
  • 2(b). 子供の頃から、パリに行くのが夢でした
  • 3(a). 子供の頃から、パリに行きたいです
  • 3(b). 子供の頃から、パリに行くのが夢です

From what I understand, if you use ずっと you have to stick with the タ形 because ずっと implicitely implies 子供の頃から、(今まで)ずっとパリに行きたかった. But, this is not the case when ずっと is not here in examples 2 and 3.

I would like to know whether examples 2(a), 2(b), 3(a), 3(b) are valid and natural and if we can interpret them the following way: 2(a) and 2(b) implies that from a young age the speaker wanted to go to Paris, however we don't know whether he did or not go to Paris at this point; however 3(a) and 3(b) implies that from a young age the speaker wants to go to Paris, and still has that dream, since he has yet to make it come true.

Is it correct?

0

As long as it is in the past tense it should be correct, so 3(a) and 3(b) are no go.

5
  • Thank you for your answer but my question is why is it so? Mar 8 '21 at 12:18
  • Where we would say I have wanted, in Japanese it would be said with past tense. Japanese is much more limited when it comes to time, so the usage of past tense is used more flexible than English. The ていた form is also useful here. To address the part of your question about the point in the past, it says から so it shows that is continuing until now. If it just said 子供の頃、パリに行きたかった。 Then it would be clear it was something back in the past.
    – Mobiusx2
    Mar 8 '21 at 12:23
  • I also think that's the reason (から) points to some time in the past but I'll wait for crossvalidation. Mar 8 '21 at 12:45
  • niwasaburoo.amebaownd.com/posts/5738196 (23.2) Tends to suggest that even with ずっと the る形 can be used. Mar 8 '21 at 17:30
  • Someone asked a similar question albeit in Japanese on iTalki. italki.com/post/question-226214?hl=ja
    – Mobiusx2
    Mar 8 '21 at 23:41
0

Only 3(a) sounds somewhat unnatural - by adding ずっと it sounds natural. Other than this one, they all sound perfectly fine.

I would like to know whether examples 2(a), 2(b), 3(a), 3(b) are valid and natural and if we can interpret them the following way: 2(a) and 2(b) implies that from a young age the speaker wanted to go to Paris, however we don't know whether he did or not go to Paris at this point; however 3(a) and 3(b) implies that from a young age the speaker wants to go to Paris, and still has that dream, since he has yet to make it come true.

Yes. This is correct. In 1/2(a/b), it might also mean "I wanted to, but there's no hope anymore".

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