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A: どこですか?住んでるとこ
B: 私地元は逗子っていって鎌倉の方です。

Firstly, is there supposed to be a ろ after the end of 住んでるとこ(as in, ところ, and was it cut short due to conversation?)

Secondly, does 言う in the te form simply loosely connect the first clause with the following clause (A place called Zushi, near Kamakura) - like it doesn't mean 'and' here, it's more like a pause because she still has more to say?

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Firstly, is there supposed to be a ろ after the end of 住んでるとこ(as in, ところ, and was it cut short due to conversation?)

It was indeed shortened from ところ, but とこ is an extremely common abbreviation of ところ used in colloquial speech, so I wouldn't say that it was "supposed to be" ところ. This is mentioned briefly here (for an entirely different usage of ところ), but it's also listed as an alternative form of ところ in Jisho. If you're comfortable reading Japanese, you can also see here.

Secondly, does 言う in the te form simply loosely connect the first clause with the following clause...?

The verb 言う here is in the て form so that the first clause can be connected to the second, but the verb itself has semantic content here - it's not just a connector. This 言う is acting like "called" does in English when it's used to explain the name of something. See here and also Jisho.

私(の)地元は逗子っていって鎌倉の方です。

My hometown is called Zushi, in/near Kamakura.

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  • I am not sure it is 「言う」 and I don't think "it's in/near Kamakura" makes sense, because 逗子市 really needs no introduction in a Japanese context. And it just sounds to me she is giving this information in a matter-of-fact, minimum-explanation-required fashion. Sort of like sitting in a room full of Americans: "Where are you from?" "I am from Long Island." You don't say, "It is in New York." – Eddie Kal Jan 14 at 3:14
  • Are you suggesting it's a conjugation of some other verb, or that conflating the いう in っていう and 言う isn't appropriate? The latter certainly occurred to me, but I'm not sure what other verb it could be. As for "in/near Kamakura", I couldn't think of an English explanation that had the same kind of broadness as 〜〜の方, but I'm not sure what else it could be referring to unless you think this is a case of someone referring to themselves with 鎌倉のかた or something along those lines. – Mindful Jan 14 at 3:19
  • I got stumped by 「ていって」. So I don't know. I'd like to say "your guess is as good as mine", but I feel iffy about putting「言う」there. The meaning of「鎌倉の方」is clear, but I think in order to explain what she (btw, A and B are both she's. This is straight from the show.) is saying here this line should be put into context. Especially what is omitted is key to understanding this utterance. She is saying, "(so yeah I hail from) those parts/that side" "that area (whence I came)", "(I came from) that direction". – Eddie Kal Jan 14 at 3:32
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    Fwiw I am fairly confident that this っていって is っていう. Re: 鎌倉の方, I updated the translation to be slightly more ambiguous, but I'm not convinced the detailed semantics of 方 are super relevant to what's being asked in this particular question. In any case I think this comment thread is getting long, so we should either wait for a native speaker to pass through or move to chat. – Mindful Jan 14 at 3:44
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    I figured どこですか?住んでるとこ gave enough context to understand what they were talking about (where do you live/where are you from) :s – Luke McAloon Jan 14 at 5:29

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